• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Need Help setting up a large home/small office network

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

pascalbrown

Member
Joined
May 29, 2007
Location
Heart of England
I'm currently trying to figure out the best way of getting internet across my home, so thought I'd ask the people who know best!

The situation is this;

1. My house. This is a big house with very thick stone walls. The internet comes into this house, in to the downstairs living room. There is 1 computer in the living room and 1 upstairs in the office. I would like these 2 computers to be connected to the internet by ethernet rather than wifi.

2. There are 3 seperate annexes from the house, all under one roof, but kept seperate. The whole house is basically a U shape with the main living area being in one leg of the U!

In each of these 3 seperate areas, I want to provide wifi access. I want to also try and be as efficient as possible with cable management, so I was thinking that I should daisy chain these wifi hotspots. Is that possible and will it cause the one on the end to become very slow with high latencies?

3. I also want to be able to manage the bandwidth. Sometimes it's mission critical that I have 95% of the bandwidth in the main house for one of the computers in the office. Can I do this via software? Any recommendations?

I would also like to do all this without a server if possible. At least without a big server box. If there is a small all in one solution then I'd be willing to go down that route, but not building a new PC.

I think that's it. If people could link to recommended hardware that would be extra useful too. I'd like to see the breakdown of the theory behind what the best implementation would be, along with the best hardware to use. Price is a concern, but it's not necessarily a restriction. I'd rather do this right the first time and spend a bit more than go back and spend even more fixing a cheap build!

Thanks a lot!
 

thehacker010

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2008
Well, I first want to say this all depends on how well wireless works in your house with think walls. With that being said, I would look into doing this...


1)Get a regular wireless router for your primary room. This will provide LAN connections to those 2 computers using some cat5e and wireless for any additional computers.

2)Get two repeater bridges. I suggest just getting a wireless router that supports DD-WRT firmware, as DD-WRT supports all of these functions.

A repeater bridge allows two things. First, it connects to the wireless signal from your first router and then repeats it. Secondly, the bridge portion allows computers to use the LAN ports of that repeater. If the wireless signal is not strong enough to be picked up by the repeaters, then you could wire some cat5e to them instead.

This setup would provide wireless and wired to all 3 sections of your house.

On a side note, I know that DD-WRT supports QoS(Quality of Service) control using several different methods of determining who gets bandwidth priority.
 
OP
pascalbrown

pascalbrown

Member
Joined
May 29, 2007
Location
Heart of England
So I could use 3 wireless bridges in series? Either hooked together by wifi or ethernet cable? The walls are ridiculously thick, so I'm thinking cable will have to be laid down, but I've got a drum half full so that's no problem.

Are all bridges equal?
What about the bandwidth management issue?

Thanks
 

thehacker010

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2008
If you want to have the option of connecting wirelessly or wired, you need repeater bridges. Regular bridges will only allow you to connect computers to it by LAN.

For the bandwidth control, like I said above, many firmwares now have a QoS management that let you control priority levels. I personally don't use them, so I can't tell you much other than what they do.

So, my idea is to have your modem connected to a wireless router, then plug 2 repeater bridges into the wireless router by either ethernet or wireless. If you wire all of them together with cable and you decide you don't want wireless, you can just switch them over to a normal bridge mode.

I only work with Wireless-G, so someone else will have to recommend good wireless-N in regards to home networking that could do this.
 
OP
pascalbrown

pascalbrown

Member
Joined
May 29, 2007
Location
Heart of England
For maximum cat5 cable efficiency, I need to daisy chain the wireless bridges. Is this possible? Can you link me to a piece of hardware that this will work with?