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Need Redhat 9 mentor

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Slowmo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
World's Lone Hyper-Power
Any takers? I want to dual boot, and want to get familiar with the operating system, but need some help. Once I have the ISO's do I burn them straight to CD?
 
OP
Slowmo

Slowmo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
World's Lone Hyper-Power
OK, I did that. Now the computer still boots to windows even though I disabled the hardrive and told it to boot from the CD. Now what? I didn't open the ISO's I just burnt them. Oh, I think I see now. You have to go to the other data and select iso files. I hope this is it.
 

SickBoy

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Yeah, you don't want to just burn the ISO file itself to the CD. There should be a "Record CD from CD Image" option or something like that.
 
OP
Slowmo

Slowmo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
World's Lone Hyper-Power
All right. Done and I booted into Linux anaconda. Unfortunately now I'm going to have to do some data swapping to free up some space and create another partition. I have about 14 gigs of permanent data in D: that I keep if I need to reinstall XP. I'll have to transfer all of that to C: delete the partition and then create a smaller D and and a third partion of about 10 gigs E: I'll use that for Linux. Do you think that's enough to get my feet wet?
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
10 gigs should be fine, as long as you don't plan on storying tons of anything there. If its just to learn and play around with, you'll have plenty of space.

BTW, this would be a good time to learn the Linux partition naming scheme, rather than referring to partitions by letter. Assuming you aren't familar with it:
The basic structure is:
/dev/hdxy

x = a letter, indicating which IDE device the partition lies. It begins at a goes up the alphabet from there, so /dev/hda is the primary master device, /dev/hdb is the primary slave, /dev/hdc primary master, and so on.

y = a number, representing the number of the partition on the device. So, /dev/hda1 is the first partition on the primary master IDE device. Likewise, /dev/hdc3 is the third partition on the secondary master IDE device.

Might seem complicated now, but its easy to get the hang of. The installer might expect you to understand how partitions are named (even if it doesn't, you'll need to know at some point); I hope my explanation was clear :)
 
OP
Slowmo

Slowmo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
World's Lone Hyper-Power
It was thanks, I've read some preliminary information. I plan on still storing all the valuables just like I did before, but want to learn about Linux. Will I be able to access say a picture that lies on /dev/hda1, which would be my primary partition (c) with filename of (x)? Also how can you have partitions on DVD drives, which would be /dev/hde1?
 

JigPu

Inactive Pokémon Moderator
Joined
Jun 20, 2001
Location
Vancouver, WA
Should be able to. I just installed Mandrake last weekend, and have had total access to all my partitions. NTFS and FAT32. Really awesome since I only have 6GB for Linux itself.

JigPu
 

Titan386

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
What filesystem is your /dev/hda1 formatted in? I'm not sure if Red Hat includes NTFS support by default (they didn't in 7.3), but if they don't, its obtained easily enough.

When you access a filesystem in Linux, its called mounting. I could go into the details, but it would make more sense to wait til you have it installed and see if you have any trouble doing it yourself. Red Hat will probably do a good deal of the work for you, and might manage to set up everything automatically. I'm not really familar with the more recent releases of Red Hat, and their capabilities, though.
 

SickBoy

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Location
Minneapolis, MN
It should have prompted you for a root password during install.... log in as root first and then you should be able to use the graphical users/groups tool to create regular user accounts.
 
OP
Slowmo

Slowmo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
World's Lone Hyper-Power
Sweeeet. Root then password, it's like a frickin riddle. Now I don't have any DSL Drivers and it doesn't recognize my Speedstream 3060 modem. I'm off to find the linux drivers, then I have no idea what to do if and when I find them. My ISP does not support linux, bummer. There are no drivers made for Speedstream 3060 and Redhat 9.0. Now what?
 
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