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New Computer Randomly Freezes and the restart button does not work at that time

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Run this command from an elevated command prompt (i.e., with admin privileges): sfc /scannow
Note, there is one space between sfc and /. This will check for and attempt to replace broken system files

Then, with elevated privileges, run: chkdsk /f /r
Note, there is one space between chkdsk and / and one space between f an /r. This will check for failing disk clusters and attempt to move the data to healthier spots on the disk.

I know you said you checked the SMART data but you didn't say how you did it. Crystaldiskinfo is an excellent tool for this and I would run it if I were you. Any color but blue indicates problems.

I would also run Memtest86+ for 3-4 passes.
 

Dlaw

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Location
New York, USA
You don't need a new power supply unit if you passed prime for a couple hours.

That's not always the case, I had a unit that would run my old 960T/EXT3/550Ti system at full load (Furmark+P95), but would cause it to crash at idle and randomly at moderate load (light gaming, web browsing, etc.). The only way to really rule out the PSU is to swap it.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
That's not always the case, I had a unit that would run my old 960T/EXT3/550Ti system at full load (Furmark+P95), but would cause it to crash at idle and randomly at moderate load (light gaming, web browsing, etc.). The only way to really rule out the PSU is to swap it.
I hate to throw parts at PCs you can use a $10.00 Digital Multimeter and make sure the rails are in correct specifications on different loads.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
I hate to throw parts at PCs you can use a $10.00 Digital Multimeter and make sure the rails are in correct specifications on different loads.

A $10 multimeter doesn't read ripple or noise.
 

Dlaw

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Location
New York, USA
A $10 multimeter doesn't read ripple or noise.

Nor will it tell you what the PSU is doing as the load changes.

I'm telling you, the only way to 100% rule out PSU issues is to swap it. Otherwise, you'll be spinning your wheels trying to diagnose everything else.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Nor will it tell you what the PSU is doing as the load changes.

I'm telling you, the only way to 100% rule out PSU issues is to swap it. Otherwise, you'll be spinning your wheels trying to diagnose everything else.

Basic power supply troubleshooting by Jonnyguru.

Using a multi-meter to determine voltage regulation.

◦Often voltage regulation is mistakenly reported as how much above or below the median value a power supply’s voltage is (for example: the +12V being at +12.1V, or the +5V being at +5.1V, etc.)

Voltage regulation is actually a gauge of how much or, preferably, how little the voltages drop going from a low to high load. If one were to think about this in context; it would actually be easier for a power supply manufacturer to put all of the unit’s voltages at a higher than normal value so even under load with poor voltage regulation the unit would still be over the median value.

To properly measure voltage regulation, a digital multi-meter should be used on a lead that has no other components on it that could potentially cause enough resistance to sway the results. First, you should measure the power supply’s voltages while the PC is idle. In the BIOS after any hard drives have spun up to full RPM is a good idle load. Next, measure the voltages again while the PC is under load. The difference between the two values is what you’re looking for. For example: If the voltage on the +5V only drops 0.05V, you are effectively witnessing 1% voltage regulation.
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDFAQs&op=FAQ_Question&ndfaq_id=29
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Basic power supply troubleshooting by Jonnyguru.

Using a multi-meter to determine voltage regulation.

Which is not a be all, end all, method to testing a PSU.
It only tells you if your sustained voltage is within spec.

As I mentioned earlier, a multimeter cannot measure noise or ripple.