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New Gaming Build for My Son

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MotherBear

New Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Hi everyone,

Looking to build a high-end gaming PC for my son and I. My son also wants to record videos for Youtube and stream live. Hoping to get some advice/suggestions from the community as everything listed here is my son's idea and I would like to make sure that these parts will work well together.

The price range I'm looking at spending is approximately $2,000.00

CPU: Intel Core i7-5930K 6-Core 3.50Ghz
GPU: MSI GTX 980TI Gaming 6GB
(Display is still 1920x1080, but will move up to 4k in the near future, can this handle 4k with good FPS?)

Motherboard: Asus ROG Rampage V Extreme/U
or
Motherboard: MSI Gaming X99A Godlike Gaming LGA 2011-v3

Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (4x4GB) DDR4 2800Mhz
M.2 Storage: Samsung 850 EVO 250GB M.2-2280
SSD Storage: Samsung 850 EVO 2.5" 500GB
HD: WD Black Series 3TB 7200RPM
Cooling: Corsair Hydro Series H110i GT 280mm Liquid CPU Cooler

Parts that my son already owns:

PSU: Corsair Professional Gold 1200W 80+ Gold
Case Phantom 820 Gunmetal
Windows 10

As for the CPU should I stick with the i7-5930k or remake the build around the new 6th Generation processors? I'm not sure which is better for gaming and thinking about future proofing a little as well.

Alright that's about it I think...Thank you all for your time in reading this.

I look forward to reading your thoughts and opinions.

Thank you in advance for your help in this and I look forward to reading your comments!
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
The i7-5930K will is the best choice for the combination of computing tasks you mention.

I would go with the ASUS motherboard as ASUS builds higher quality stuff than does MSI.

If the extra cost is not prohibitive I would definitely recommend a change in the storage from m.2 sata to m.2 PCIE. The Asus board supports it and it is way faster than m.2 SATA. Lot more bandwidth.

If he will be overclocking the CPU I would recommend going with a 3x120 fan water cooling system. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106241. I believe the case supports a 3x120 configuration.

And the video card, Nvidia has recently come out with a newer, more powerful gaming card (GTX 1080 series) than the 980ti and with his intention to go 4k I would check the new card out.
 
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Tír na nÓg

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2015
I'd grab a 5820k (no SLI planned, so no need of the extra PCI lanes the 5930k offers), and put the extra cash into a GTX 1080: better handling of 4K gaming.

And if you plan on adding a second 1080 in the future, having PCIe-3 working at 8x/8x won't make any noticeable differnce outside of benchmarking.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I would go with a 5820K as well considering no SLI, etc. No need for the lanes.

I also suggest getting a MUCH less pricey board. No need for such a high end thing(s)... something like MSI Gaming M5/Gigabyte Gaming M5/Asus Pro Gamer, etc. will be plenty of board for your uses.

The 980Ti will not handle 4K well alone, no. I would personally look at getting a GTX 1070 (performs slightly better than 980Ti, latest generation) or a 1080. When you move up to 4K you will want another 1070 or 1080. Nothing really out now that can push 4K alone). Even with adding another card, as Tir said, with 8x/8x config, you lose a whopping 1% over 16x/16x. Not something to pay hundreds more for both in board and CPU. ;)

With your suggested cooler, you will get mid range overclocks. I would imagine 4Ghz-4.2GHz or so depending on many factors (quality of CPU/voltage, ambient temps, case airflow, etc). I would be fine there with the AIO you chose personally... If you want more out of the chip, then I would look into something bigger.

I would go with the ASUS motherboard as ASUS builds higher quality stuff than does MSI.
Really?!!! I wouldn't call that true, at least in the Intel world. MSI boards are PLENTY fine.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
There must be a better or worse motherboard made in manufacturing, there has to be. Cars have better and worse statistics from consumer reports (Most Reliable Toyota Camry). Why don't we do that here?
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Because we don't have the statistics available to us for everything to make that assessment. We have that french site that reported failure rates of products I have linked at this site numerous times, but everything, outside of a bad apple or two, were over 95%. Why would one worry about the difference between 97% and 98%??? I'm sure there is a difference, but its not as much as most people seem to think. See my threads.. or this that I just googled:
Because of this, motherboards have one of the highest overall failure rate of any core component with about 1 out of every 20 motherboards failing for one reason or another. This may seem like a high failure rate, but the silver lining is that nearly all of these failures we catch in-house before the system is shipped to the customer. In fact, motherboards as a whole only have a ~.7% failure rate (or less than one out of every 100) when you only look at post-shipping failures.
https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Most-Reliable-PC-Hardware-of-2015-749/#Motherboard
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Thanks for the link on failure rate (less than one out of every 100) is a lot to me, they sell by the thousands around the world.

Motherboard

A reliable motherboard is essential in a high quality computer. Not only is a motherboard very difficult to swap out, but the effects of a poor quality motherboard can be far reaching and difficult to troubleshoot. This is complicated by the fact that motherboards are one of the most complex components in a computer. There are SATA, USB, fan, and network controllers as well as the physical ports, audio chips, and everything else that is needed to inter-connect every component in your system. This is a huge number of small parts that have to work perfectly together and any one of these could potentially have a problem. If there is a single dead USB port, slight static over the audio, or the voltage levels are measured outside of norm, it does not meet our standards and is considered to have failed.

Because of this, motherboards have one of the highest overall failure rate of any core component with about 1 out of every 20 motherboards failing for one reason or another. This may seem like a high failure rate, but the silver lining is that nearly all of these failures we catch in-house before the system is shipped to the customer. In fact, motherboards as a whole only have a ~.7% failure rate (or less than one out of every 100) when you only look at post-shipping failures. https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Most-Reliable-PC-Hardware-of-2015-749/#Motherboard
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Thanks for the link on failure rate (less than one out of every 100) is a lot to me, they sell by the thousands around the world.
You want to discern between less than one percent chance of failure? Ill take my chances. :)
 

LutaWicasa

, Immutable, Administrator
Joined
Dec 22, 2000
Location
Huntsville, AL
You want to discern between less than one percent chance of failure? Ill take my chances. :)

That's on their systems they ship (they've already weeded out problem mobos) ...it's more like a 5% failure of mobos overall ;)

But...with that said, I have had very few doa or screwed up mobos purchased personally.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Indeed. That doesn't change my position, however. :)

I don't have the time in my life to search for that 2%. For god sakes I play blackjack and, at those odds, I lose 51% of the time... buying any piece of computer hardware from a reputable brand really doesn't phase me at 95%+ success rates.

Here is the latest from that French website (for motherboards):
- ASUS 1.89% (against 2.43%)
- Gigabyte 2.05% (against 2.96%)
- ASRock 2.08% (against 2.61%)
- MSI 2.55% (against 2.82 %)

GPUs:
- Gainward 1.41% (against 1.44%)
- ASUS 1.66% (against 2.08%)
- Gigabyte 1.78% (against 2.37%)
- MSI 2.16% (against 2.48 %)
- Sapphire 2.28% (against 2.71%)
- Zotac 2.32% (against 1.57%)

SSDs:
- Intel 0.18% (against 0.15%)
- Samsung 0.28% (against 0.18%)
- Kingston 0.28% (against 0.32%)
- Crucial 0.29% (against 0.41 %)
- Sandisk 0.49% (against 0.48%)
- Corsair 0.94% (against 0.27%)

http://www.hardware.fr/articles/944-2/cartes-meres.html

Id have as good a chance picking blindly. :)
 
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LutaWicasa

, Immutable, Administrator
Joined
Dec 22, 2000
Location
Huntsville, AL
Indeed. That doesn't change my position, however. :)

I don't have the time in my life to search for that 2%. For god sakes I play blackjack and, at those odds, I lose 51% of the time... buying any piece of computer hardware from a reputable brand really doesn't phase me at 95%+ success rates.
Easy big fella, I agree with you...buy reputable product from reputable dealer, it's all good :thup:
I simply pointed out what was stated in your Puget quote ;)
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
:)

You misunderstood the tone there. All good here!

It does bother me at times when I see people make more out of reliability than there really is. For most brands, outside of an anomolous issue with a product, the differences between them are negligible in many cases.