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New Multimeter...any good

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prankstar008

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Location
San Diego, CA
My hi-tech grandma recentaly bought a new DVD player and TIVO thus making her VCR obselete. Figuring I had a use for it, she gave it to me. It sat in my garage for about a year waiting to be e-bayed. I finaly took it to a pawn shop and was offered $5USD for it. While I was at the pawn shop I found a whole cabinet filled with 5 or 6 multimeters. They were priced anywhere from $80 to $45. I was lucky enough to find one with no price tag on it. I took it out of the cabinet and showed it to the guy at the pawn shop. (sorry im rambeling) He had no idea what it was and said "oh...um.... five bucks". I ended up trading in the VCR for the multimeter. I took the multimeter home and stuck it in a light socket to make sure it works, which it does. How the hell do I use it and how do I know if its accurate. (it has some Ohms sensitivity knob??? and DC 1500, 150, 15: AC 1500, 150, 15 and 2 things that are in electrical talk. My grandpa is an electrical engineer and I was going to have him explain it to me, but he is on vacation for 3 weeks and Im anxious. Thanks.

EDIT: was $5 good for a multi???
 

ktschmit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2003
Location
Alaska
$5 is a pretty good price if it works. I take it has a meter and not digital? You could check it on known voltages like a 1.5v, 9v,or 12v dc batteries. Could also test psu voltages. There are more uses for it that I could mention. I use them alot on automotive testing.
 

ktschmit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2003
Location
Alaska
Try a known voltage of a new A,AA, or AAA battery. Set the dial to test low dc voltage. If you read 1.5v on any of these batteries, the unit is reading pretty accurate in that range. The adjustment wheel is used to center the needle on O prior to test. You can also set the voltage to AC for testing household voltage. And by all means, talk to the pro (Grandpa) who can show you all the rest of the uses! Have fun!
 

Dubbin1

Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2003
Location
Ohio
ktschmit said:
Try a known voltage of a new A,AA, or AAA battery. Set the dial to test low dc voltage. If you read 1.5v on any of these batteries, the unit is reading pretty accurate in that range. The adjustment wheel is used to center the needle on O prior to test. You can also set the voltage to AC for testing household voltage. And by all means, talk to the pro (Grandpa) who can show you all the rest of the uses! Have fun!

And just how are you going to know the "known voltage" of a battery without a meter that you know reads accurately? I have bought many batteries that are above and below 1.5. Also a nicad is 1.25V and a NiMH is 1.2 at full charge. There is no way I would use a $5 multimeter to do any testing with.

If you want a good one then spend the money on a Fluke
 

ktschmit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2003
Location
Alaska
Yep! Guess your right. To really know the exact voltage, you will have to borrow a "Fluke" first. Or have it tested @ Radio Shack for free. ;-)
 

greenman100

Disabled
Joined
May 18, 2003
Location
trying to keep all the magic smoke in
Dubbin1 said:
And just how are you going to know the "known voltage" of a battery without a meter that you know reads accurately? I have bought many batteries that are above and below 1.5. Also a nicad is 1.25V and a NiMH is 1.2 at full charge. There is no way I would use a $5 multimeter to do any testing with.

If you want a good one then spend the money on a Fluke


you have a lot ot learn

have bought several cheapo meters, all are accurate to .1% compated to a calibrated Fluke...

open a cheapo one up, there's usually calibration pots in there, they're calibrated at the factory

for his purposes and budget, a fluke is unneccessary, esp a calibrated fluke