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New PC and I'd like some feedback on my build.

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FriGiN

New Member
Joined
May 19, 2019
So yeah I came into some money, so I'm not going budget pc in any means, I have pretty much specced out what i want and want advice from you lovely people to see if I made any good choices.

Here's My Thoughts:
I always go intel, so the obvious choice is the i9-9900k
noctua nh-d15 because i want to lose my current water cooled system
with intel i like to go so ROG ASUS ROG Maximus XI Extreme LGA 1151 (300 Series) Intel Z390 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.1 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard
64gb of rgb trident memory
4x1tb samsung 970 evo pluses for on board raid 0 storage for games and applications
2x.5tb samsung 970 evo pluses for OS in a raid 0 put onto...
the asus hyper m.2 pcie board again for fastest load times on OS
4x4tb 7200 64mb cache datacenter hdd's for all of my storage in a raid 0
Geforce RTX 2080 ti
evga super nova 850 80plus titanium power supply
fractal design case with...
Noctua case fans
cable mod evga modular cables

the only thing that i'm getting that isnt in this basket is the cable mod stuff i have to get that from cable mod themselves

https://secure.newegg.com/Wishlist/SharedWishlistDetail?ID=gkDsYBGAYRd2FEAPYagNhg==

so please feel free to pick apart my ideas. If you want to say something is overkill this is a futureproof as it can be system i likely wont be able to make a new one for a few years.

what do i do with this pc?

mostly game fps's mmorpgs offline games as well and stream occasionally.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
With all those RAID 0 arrays I hope you have a good backup plan for your data.

In my experience with onboard RAID 0 for the OS and boot using SATA drives, the time it took for initialization of the RAID upon every boot caused slower boot times than just using a single non RAID SATA SSD. That effect may be magnified using PCI-e NVME drives since they are quicker than SATA and a higher percentage of the total boot time would be taken up by the RAID initialization. Of course, my experience with all that was in the days before UEFI. Whether or not that will make a difference I don't know. But I will hazzard a guess to say that you will be underwhelmed by any boot time improvement you might see.
 
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FriGiN

New Member
Joined
May 19, 2019
honestly im not at all worried about data loss. I'm running much the same setup right now with my current rig, and i've only had 1 catastrophic crash.. i'm more interested in speed and capacity all of my important stuff is on a nas and a rack server.
 
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FriGiN

New Member
Joined
May 19, 2019
thank you, you sure you dont have any criticisms? i dont mind.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
You could save some money on the Noctua thermal paste, the cooler comes with thermal paste.
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
4x4tb 7200 64mb cache datacenter hdd's for all of my storage in a raid 0
I see no reason to use a RAID array for storage and especially not RAID0 - striped. RAID0 provides no fault tolerance or redundancy. The failure of one drive will cause the entire array to fail resulting in total data loss. That is a bad choice for data "storage".

And even if you go RAID1, a mirrored drive should not be considered a backup. Mirrored arrays are to ensure uninterrupted up-time. So I recommend single drives. Then have a separate NAS or networked computer to use as a backup device.

We use Fractal Design cases in most of our builds lately and I have found the included fans to be most excellent in terms of the amount of air they move and in how quietly they move that massive amount of air. I would not bother with the Noctua case fans - at least not until you see how well the included FD fans do. If you determine you need additional fans, I would still consider adding FD fans to match the included ones and since they are quite affordable too. Even when cost does not matter, there's still nothing wrong with spending efficiently.

New computers typically need new operating system licenses. OEM/System Builder licenses used previously on another computer cannot "legally" be transferred to a new computer under any circumstances.
 

Zerileous

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2002
Do take care that the Noctua will fit without conflicts, particularly with memory. I think raid NVMe is pointless, you may want to do some research on performance as the difference will probably not be noticeable. Unless you're routinely retrieving large files from the drives, it will not likely make a difference outside of benchmarks. It's unlikely as well that with limited exception that 64gb will become beneficial before DDR4 is legacy hardware.

If you are performing the types of tasks that would benefit from NVMe raid and 64GB ram, a HEDT system may be more appropriate for you, since budget is not a factor.
 

Mpegger

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
I too would ditch all the RAID0 m.2, especially with 64GiB of ram. You won't see much if any speed up of boot time or program load speeds from it, and as others have pointed out, more then likely increased boot times because of having to start up the RAID before actually even loading the OS. Unless you really need that kind of load speed because of large files you work with, it's just overkill and not something you would notice on a regular gaming rig. And if you did need that speed because you do work with large files, you'd go with a board that could easily handle 256GiB+ of ram, so save some money there on the excessive number of solid state drives.

If I were putting that together, in regards to storage space, I'd get whatever is the fastest drive currently possible as the primary boot/OS/program drive, 500GiB minumum, 1TiB preferred (or larger depending on how many programs [not games] you will install on it). Since money is abundant, I'd go with a large high performance mechanical drive, 4TB minimum, to house games and such, and then pair it with a 1TiB SSD cache drive with PrimoCache. With 64GiB of ram, you can easily dedicate 16GiB to the primary/boot drive as cache, and then 16GiB + the 1TiB SSD as cache for the mechanical game drive, using PrimoCache.

Then, just get a couple of large drives with enough space for backup purposes.

For reference:

There's more videos then just that one showing similar results.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
I don't use NVME drive for gaming due to negligible performance increase compared to SATA SSD. Here is a Video to explain.
 

Mpegger

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
I forgot to ask as well, what about the monitor? Getting the best available today to support the system specs you're going for could easily put the cost of the monitor around the same price as everything else in the system combined (after ditching all the extra SSDs).