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New SFF Rig

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corruption

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Location
Bermuda
Well, I think it's finally time to pull the trigger on a new build. My current system is essentially what's listed in my sig, all packed into a Thermaltake Armor case. I'd like to move to a SFF setup to clear some floor space but I'd like the system to be quiet which I know can be a bit of an upward struggle with a SFF setup. I'm currently looking at the hardware listed below and am trying to decide what to do with the panel configuration on the case. I'm leaning towards a vented panel on the GPU side and a windowed panel on the motherboard side, with all fans blowing as exhaust. This will pull fresh air past the GPU easily keeping it as cool as if it was on an open bench if not cooler due to the inherent airflow. I am somewhat concerned about the motherboard not being cool enough with the window but would like opinions.

Note that I wouldn't mind going with a 32GB RAM kit, but will cut things somewhat close budget-wise. All parts have to be shipped to Bermuda, going through a freight forwarder as it will be far cheaper than any other direct method with the exception of possibly the case. Shipping rates are calculated by the actual or dimensional weight, with the greater being the charge.

There is also duty on items imported. Essentially tack on an additional 26% to the item cost to cover duty and administration fees. I estimate the total for the parts list below will be around $2,900 to $3,100 all said and done. Before I go ahead and pull the trigger I'd like to make sure that there aren't better choices for the hardware selection. What do you guys think?



PCPartPicker Part List:

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($328.90 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i PRO 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($116.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte X570 I AORUS PRO WIFI Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($219.79 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($199.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 4 TB 2.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($122.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card ($418.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA GM 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular SFX Power Supply ($89.94 @ ModMyMods)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM 60.1 CFM 120 mm Fan ($29.90 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM 60.1 CFM 120 mm Fan ($29.90 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM 60.1 CFM 120 mm Fan ($29.90 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM 60.1 CFM 120 mm Fan ($29.90 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Logitech G613 Wireless Standard Keyboard ($81.89 @ OutletPC)
Mouse: Logitech G900 CHAOS SPECTRUM Wireless Optical Mouse ($79.50 @ Amazon)
Custom: Sliger SM570 ($259.00)
Total: $2121.47
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-05 13:29 EDT-0400


Freight Forwarder Rates:

First pound - $14.75
Each additional pound (from 2 to 30lbs) - $4.40
Each additional pound (from 31 to 150lbs) - $3.20

Dimensional Weight = Package Length x Width x Height divided by 139​
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
For ~5% less performance and quiet in a sff build, I'd look at a 2060 Super instead of that power hungry 5700xt.

Even for a storage drive.. unless it's really 'cold' storage, I'd get 7200 rpm.
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
I've always seen ITX as a form factor for people who have maybe a few feet total for their set up, like in a closet or something. I'd advise bumping up to mATX, if only for the slightly less cramped space for airflow purposes. Other than that, I agree with EarthDog, 2060 Super will run cooler, and quieter, than the 5700XT.

What will you be using the build for? It's kind of hard to say if you should change your CPU, etc without knowing what your processing load will look like.
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
http://www.sliger.com/products/cases/sm570/

As Vishera noted, you did not say what the primary use of this system will be. Gaming? General surfing and office tasks? Will you be overclocking?

Is the computer room environmentally controlled (air conditioned)?

I do see where you said you want it to be quiet. How quiet? With all the ventilation options, this case may work for a fully passive (no fan) option. My concern is even at low RPMs and quality fans, 4 x 120mm fans will make some noise.

Not sure having all the fans as exhaust is a good idea. Generally, you want a "flow" of air through the case - typically front-to-back or bottom-to-top. A "flow" typically has more force or concentrated CFM behind it - a good thing. If all your fans are mounted on the same surface plane, then a flow might be achieved. But I don't see where you can put 4 fans on the same case plane with that case. So I don't see a flow being produced. This means air (unfiltered air at that) will be pulled in to the case from all directions through every vent, crack, port, and crevice with no real unified direction to the flow. That may not provide enough cooling for other heat sensitive devices and surely will result in dust being pulled into USB and other ports - not a good thing.

Also, I don't see where having all your case fans as exhaust will help your graphics card, as you imagine. Being a double wide card, it will naturally exhaust the card's heated air out the back of the case. But it will be trying to pull cool air from within the case. However, with all your fan trying to exhaust internal air, those exhaust fans may be competing with the card fans for that cool air. This may create a significant underpressure scenario - actually starving the interior of cool air.

My point is, when going with active (fan) cooling, you want a "slight" over-pressure as then you can control where the air enters the case (which is hopefully through air filters and not ports) and that is only accomplished with more intakes than exhausts.

I hate fan noise. I mean I really hate it. So if me and I was considering that case, I think I would go for a solid right side panel, windowed left side and initially put two 120mm fans on the bottom as intakes and I would get the optional bottom dust filter too. I would run with that and see if adequate cooling was achieved. If I determined additional air "flow" was needed, I would add 1 x 120mm on top, as an exhaust fan. If more was still needed, then a 2nd fan on top as an exhaust fan.

While 5400RPM drives tend to make less noise and vibrations than faster spinning drives, they still are not silent. Do you really need 4GB of internal storage? If not, I recommend going all SSD. They are silent, perform better, consume less power, and generate less heat - and take up less physical space too.

I've always seen ITX as a form factor for people who have maybe a few feet total for their set up, like in a closet or something
SFF computers are becoming more and more popular even when lots of desk or floor space is available. And they are very popular when used for a HTPC (home theater PC) where aesthetics may matter too.

Last, remember new computers require their own Windows license. You cannot "legally" transfer OEM licenses from older computers - only full "retail" licenses are transferable. So be sure to budget for a new Windows license too, if needed.
 
OP
corruption

corruption

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Location
Bermuda
Thanks for the input guys! To answer some questions...

System use:
The system will be a general workhorse; gaming, photo and video editing (gotta keep a record of the kids as they grow up), general browsing and some QuickBooks use for the business.​

GFX Card:
I'll look into the 2060 Super. Shaving ~50W would be good for reduced heat production and the power bill. I don't currently have BF5 but plan on picking it up soon. The 5700XT definitely has an advantage over the 2060 Super in that title, but I'll have to look a little further at the other games that I play/plan on picking up to see how they fare.​

Storage:
I currently have a 500GB OS drive and 1TB drive for storage. Both drives are backed up to a 2TB drive. The 4TB drive in my SFF build is to be used solely for Acronis backups. A 7200rpm drive would be preferred, but finding a reliable 2.5" drive that's 7200rpm and 4+TB is difficult without blowing the budget.

ITX Choice:
Space is at a premium with 2 kids in a 2 bedroom setting. My rig is currently in the living room with me sitting on the couch to use it. We're replacing the couches soon as we brought them with us when we moved back to the island and were ideal for a larger space....not so much anymore and they're not exactly new. The new living room couch will be better suited to the space and will allow me to have a small desk which is currently under construction in the garage...for the last 3.5 years. (It's not a complicated build, there's just been no rush to finish it as there's no space inside for it yet!)​

Case ventilation and fan setup:
The room is generally climate controlled. With that being said, I usually set the AC between 25°C and 27°C in the summer as an escape from the heat. (Power is between $600 - $900 a month with the AC's running in the summer so chilling the room further isn't an option.) I expect that the fans will have to spin faster to facilitate cooling during the summer months and I can tolerate additional noise during that time.

Setting all fans as exhaust is a choice directly due to the vented panel over the GFX card. (I'm avoiding any blower-fan cards like the plague and am only considering double or triple fan coolers.) The ventilation slots will allow a LOT of airflow...The 4 fans should have no issue pulling air in through the side panel, but I'm wondering if I should also have a vented side panel on the motherboard's side to help with cooling the board. Some reviewers have noted that lower fans are choked by close proximity to the desk when set as intakes. I plan to either get the filter for the vented side panel to help minimize dust accumulation in the system, or fashion a filter of my own.​

Windows License:
I haven't included it in the list as it will be a digital purchase. I'm also planning on this being another multi-boot system with MX Linux and another OS for testing.​

I appreciate the ideas, recommendations, and cautions for the build, keep them coming!
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
The 4TB drive in my SFF build is to be used solely for Acronis backups.
Then I would consider an external drive you only connect when needed. If you install an internal HD, it will be spinning (and making noise) all the time.
 

Vishera

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
If you really can't afford the extra space for an mATX case, then by all means, ITX is the choice. I was just thinking it might be a bit better for airflow purposes is all. If you can pull it off some time in the future, I would definitely recommend it though. mATX is still very small, and you don't even have to jump up to an mATX board to use it.

As far as parts go, everything is looking good for what you plan to use it for. The 2060 Super will be good for everything up to 75Hz 1440p (you might have to sacrifice some eye candy for that, but generally speaking, it should be achievable without too much loss in quality), and the 3700X will be just fine for video and photo editing. I would recommend the jump to 32GB of RAM for comfort, generally speaking 24 is considered the sort of entry point for video editing, and that's a bit of an odd number anyways. The only other suggestion I have is, if you're using your TV as your monitor, you might want to consider switching to something like a 40" computer monitor that serves as your TV as well. Generally speaking, TVs aren't that well calibrated for photo editing. You'll want to get something that covers at least 95% of the Adobe RGB spectrum, has an IPS panel, and has around 5ms response time (usually the lowest you'll find for IPS panels due to how the technology works).

I'm a graphics editor by trade, so if you have any more questions about editing and such down the line, feel free to shoot me a PM!
 
OP
corruption

corruption

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Location
Bermuda
Then I would consider an external drive you only connect when needed. If you install an internal HD, it will be spinning (and making noise) all the time.

I'm hesitant on the external drive partly due to just plain forgetting to plug it in to run a backup vs having it automated, but also due to my 3 year old's interest in electronic hardware...she investigates everything. I've resumed my previous workplace's policy of locking a workstation whenever leaving the unit as my daughter will often type and click on everything...so far it's definitely helped with disaster mitigation. I don't want her running around with an external drive as the potential for dropping it is almost a given. With that being said, the price point on an external drive is more friendly than the internal 2.5" drive...I'll have to mull over this for a bit.

If you really can't afford the extra space for an mATX case, then by all means, ITX is the choice. I was just thinking it might be a bit better for airflow purposes is all. If you can pull it off some time in the future, I would definitely recommend it though. mATX is still very small, and you don't even have to jump up to an mATX board to use it.

As far as parts go, everything is looking good for what you plan to use it for. The 2060 Super will be good for everything up to 75Hz 1440p (you might have to sacrifice some eye candy for that, but generally speaking, it should be achievable without too much loss in quality), and the 3700X will be just fine for video and photo editing. I would recommend the jump to 32GB of RAM for comfort, generally speaking 24 is considered the sort of entry point for video editing, and that's a bit of an odd number anyways. The only other suggestion I have is, if you're using your TV as your monitor, you might want to consider switching to something like a 40" computer monitor that serves as your TV as well. Generally speaking, TVs aren't that well calibrated for photo editing. You'll want to get something that covers at least 95% of the Adobe RGB spectrum, has an IPS panel, and has around 5ms response time (usually the lowest you'll find for IPS panels due to how the technology works).

I'm a graphics editor by trade, so if you have any more questions about editing and such down the line, feel free to shoot me a PM!

Space is definitely tight and I haven't found an mATX case that has really grabbed my interest. I know that it will definitely provide better airflow and be easier to work in, but my desk is only about 2' x 3.5' and I don't want to put the new rig on the floor. Is there a case that you'd recommend? Tastes differ from user to user, but I'm open to suggestions. It's very likely that I haven't seen a case that would be perfect in appearance, airflow, and cost.

I think I'm set on the 3700x as I'd like the power in reserve even if its not used all the time. In the past I've found that I've only really added storage and a wireless card to previous desktops and have only upgraded one CPU and a few GFX cards. Generally when I get a new CPU, I get a new MB too as I tend to run the system for a few years. On the Intel side, this means that they've moved to a different socket. Depending on how things go, I may upgrade the CPU in a few years, assuming that AM4 is still supported/around, and will most probably upgrade the GFX card down the road.

I think I'll go for 32GB of RAM as upgrading on this board will necessitate replacing both modules outright and I can't see selling a used 16GB kit easily here. Do you have a recommendation concerning RAM? I see that a lot of people are going with 3200 CL14 or 3600 CL16 as their performance is close enough to equal to not notice for everyday tasks. With that being said, I'll have to find a kit that doesn't expand the budget too much which I know is a lot to ask for.

Thankfully I'm not using the TV as a monitor! For gaming it would be one thing, but doing anything with text would be a nightmare for me. I have a 24" AOC G2460GPQ (144Hz) sitting on the coffee table. (It was bought locally for an absurd ~$500 as my previous monitor was subjected to damage from a toddler's jabbing finger.) My next display will be a 1440 or 4K low latency IPS panel, but it's not in the budget for at least another year or two. The current monitor is TFT and isn't professionally calibrated, but it's close enough for my purposes at this time.) I'll definitely keep you in mind if I need guidance or recommendations for editing!



Thanks for the input guys, I appreciate being able to run this by fellow techies!
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
Having 5 kids, 8 grandkids, and now one great-grand kid, I understand your plight. I note a good USB hub sitting on the desk connected to the back of the PC allows the drive to sit higher up on the top of a shelf or hutch and will keep inquisitive hands away from things like that. Also, having a kids keyboard and mouse, and old spare computer just for them helped too. ;)

An alternative that worked very well for me was to use a NAS (in my case, an old repurposed XP machine, loaded up with drives) sitting in the dark and "scary" :D basement furnace room was very effective at keeping nosy rugrats away - at least until they were old enough to know better and that the furnace room was not scary after all. Plus, being connected to the network via Ethernet made it easy to backup all the other computers in the house. I just made sure that XP system was isolated from the Internet by blocking that access in my router. If you have multiple computers to backup, or files to share, a NAS (network attached storage) is the way to go, IMO.

Having said that, when it comes to secondary drives, I always prefer them to be internal. IMO, the USB interface has never been as "universal" or reliable as the USB-IF promotes it to be. Tech sites are awash with users complaining about slow speeds and lost connections with their USB devices. :( So again, with an internal drive you may have to deal with noise and vibration from the drive, but a good case will typically suppress that - at least below ambient noise levels. Anti-vibration noise suppression drive mounting screws work too - if noise is really that big of an issue. Similar screws or grommets are available for case fans too. We sometimes use them in our HTPC builds where the client demands total silence but passive (no fan) cooling is insufficient.

So with that, I note it is wise you intend to have a drive dedicated to backups. However, housing that drive in the same case as the computer has its own set of drawbacks. Should you have a catastrophic power failure, for example, that zaps your computer, it could take out your primary and this back up drive at the same time. Or a flood, fire or tornado could take it all out at once. Or even a bad guy who breaks into your home and steals your computer. I note these same scenarios can apply to an external drive sitting next to your monitor. So having a backup plan that involves multiple backups with at least one backup in a different part of the house (or better yet, off-site) is essential.

That takes me back to the external drive - only instead of keeping it next to your monitor, unplug it after making your backup and move it to a different part of the house. That is not as robust a backup plan as keeping the backup off-site, but it is still better than keeping the backup next to the computer. Of course, then you need to discipline yourself to manually do backups on a regular basis.

As far as RAM, it important to note more RAM trumps faster RAM. That is, 32GB of slower RAM is still better than 16GB of faster RAM - at least in terms of human perception. So when the budget matters, don't worry so much about getting the fastest RAM possible. Just make sure you get RAM with the same specs as RAM listed on the motherboard's QVL - qualified vendors list - to ensure compatibility. This list, along with the CPU QVL, will be maintained on the motherboard's webpage. Note there are too many RAM makers and models for board makers to test and list them all. So you don't have to get listed RAM but you should get RAM with the same specs as listed RAM to ensure compatibility.
 
OP
corruption

corruption

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Location
Bermuda
@Bill_Bright

I hear you about trying to restrict access to equipment! I keep the majority of the networking gear out of reach, but I wont' be able to put an external drive anywhere too out of reach without it being an inconvenience to myself.

I have a D-Link DNS-320L NAS, but it's slow (roughly 30MB/sec peak). I have my Acronis file backups copied from my desktop's backup drive to a designated folder on the NAS. This folder is synchronized with a cloud drive. The cloud and NAS only have a copy of the equivalent of my Users directory to save space and time, while the OS image stays only on my desktop's backup drive. I've dealt with many requests for data retrieval with my current business and have tried to layer my backups to avoid having to recover my own data. As a backup is only as good as the last time it was successfully run, I try to have the process as automated as possible. Replacing the NAS with a more capable unit would be nice, but the new system is a higher priority on the wants list that can be budgeted at this time.

I've been looking at the 32GB kits and am trying to decide between two G.SKILL kits. G.SKILL lists both kits in their "RAM Configurator" as being compatible with my selected board. At this point I'm most likely overthinking it, but I'm stuck trying to decide if I should spend the $30 more for a faster kit as most reviews that I've seen state that 3600MHz at 16CL is the sweet spot for value vs. performance.


 

||Console||

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2004
Sup buddy the new build looks great , i wish you were still local so I would get a chance to see it in person .
One thing I was thinking about is your Fans . Does that case have some type of built in PWM fan hub as your ITX board really only has 2 free headers . If it doesn't you might need to grab a Hub to power them all . Those Fans don't work properly if speed is set lower then %40 .
 

DaveB

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
I've always seen ITX as a form factor for people who have maybe a few feet total for their set up, like in a closet or something. I'd advise bumping up to mATX, if only for the slightly less cramped space for airflow purposes. Other than that, I agree with EarthDog, 2060 Super will run cooler, and quieter, than the 5700XT.

Yes, I'd consider mATX but I don't think you want to go that way. That ITX case is 14.05" x 5.31" x 11.30" which is fairly large, but has very poor airflow that almost forces you to add that AIO water cooler. The 3700X doesn't need to be water cooled, that pricey case is making you do it. IMO the $500 price tag for the case, fans and AIO is insane. You should be able to get by with a $100 case like the Phanteks Enthoo Evolv Shift Air while using the AMD cooler and apply the $275 savings to a better GPU. It is a bit larger at 18.5" x 6.7" x 10.8" but has a similar look and doesn't stack the GPU on top of the motherboard which is what suffocates the CPU HS/Fan. Here's the manufacturer's info page on it. But it is your money.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
I already posted that before but this is my ITX with Ryzen and 1660Ti:
IMG_20191014_141932.jpg

CPU: [email protected] + Noctua U12A, can be U12S with 2 fans, max temps in a closed case with AVX ~86°C
Case: Raijintek Metis Plus, costs ~$65 link they have also something like this but I think that Sliger has a better design - link
RAM: 16GB Dominator Plat RGB but can be anything 16GB or more if it's required ~$100+
GFX card: MSI GTX1660Ti OC - ~$275 but EVGA should fit too and short 2060 also but I don't recommend more than ~130W cards in ITX cases or they get noisy or throttle
PSU: Enermax 650W SFX ... can be any SFX like Corsair SF600 is great and runs passive up to 50%+ load ... SFX saves space and is lighter than ATX
Mobo: there is ASUS CH8 Impact but can be any ITX/DTX mobo

It's just an example of what I made.

To run higher wattage graphics card without noise or overheating you need a larger case like mATX or something with good airflow next to the GFX card. That vented Sliger case looks great but most others in ITX format will cause issues.
My experience with the Evolv Shift ... big, problems with reasonable coolers, bad airflow, every 130W+ graphics card is noisy.

Btw. AMD stock cooler can't even handle 3k Ryzens at stock without throttling. It causes the CPU to hit 95°C and throttle down but the user can't see how the CPU clock drops.
 
Last edited:

DaveB

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
Btw. AMD stock cooler can't even handle 3k Ryzens at stock without throttling. It causes the CPU to hit 95°C and throttle down but the user can't see how the CPU clock drops.

Then they shouldn't include them in the package. It just makes AMD look bad to novice builders who just assume (quite correctly) that they should work. They look decent, much better than Intel stock HS/Fans. Intel doesn't provide HS/Fans with their "K" series overclockable CPUs and AMD shouldn't include them with their "X" series higher TDP CPUs just like with the original 1000 series Ryzens. A bonus is that AMD could sell them cheaper deleting both the cost of the cooler and the extra shipping cost due to the weight of the cooler. I only used one of the AMD coolers once, with a mini ITX Ryzen 5 1600 setup when they first came out. The AMD cooler didn't work well in that instance due to clearance issues between the top of the cooler fan and bottom of the power supply. Since I've used a 240mm AIO Corsair H100i and then my trusty old Hyper 212 EVO.
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
Woomack said:
Btw. AMD stock cooler can't even handle 3k Ryzens at stock without throttling. It causes the CPU to hit 95°C and throttle down but the user can't see how the CPU clock drops.
Then I would blame the case (and perhaps ambient) cooling, not the cooler. And of course, proper case cooling is the responsibility of the computer assembler/user. If it was the stock cooler's lack of capability, virtually every one of those Ryzen users would be complaining - and that is not happening.

I agree with DaveB - they shouldn't include them in the package if not capable. And to that, I say they wouldn't.

So the fault lies on the user for failing to provide adequate case cooling. That may mean those processors should not go in tiny ITX cases as they simply lack the necessary space and cooling options. Those processors may not belong in notebooks or AiO computers either as those cases are just too confined too. Makers can pack the horsepower into tiny cases, but not the cooling.

DaveB said:
It just makes AMD look bad to novice builders who just assume (quite correctly) that they should work.
Ummm, I have a different take on this. I say "It would just make AMD look bad."

All users, from novice to advanced pros, should be able to assume any supplied OEM cooler that is packaged by the manufacturer with any processor is fully capable of keeping the processor properly cooled at the default clocks in a properly cooled case. And I'll go a step further and say they... ..."we" can make that assumption.

Both AMD and Intel include decent OEM coolers with their processors. That was not true years ago. But sadly, as often happens, many think what was, still is and always will be. And so those folks still believe all OEM coolers are junk - and worse, they rumormonger their outdated and inaccurate beliefs. :(

But it is just not true today. Both AMD and Intel heard the complaints and both now include coolers that are more than adequate - even with mild to moderate overclocking. And both Intel and AMD addressed another complaint with their OEM coolers of yesteryear - noise. Today's OEM coolers are MUCH quieter than they used to be. And again, in a good, properly cooled case, most of the time the CPU HSF cooler is silent.

Are they the best and quietest coolers out there? Of course not. And they don't pretend to be. I think it is important to also remember it is not necessary to achieve the coolest temps possible. It is only necessary to ensure CPU temps sit comfortably within the specified temperature range. That is, a CPU running at 30°C will not be more stable, perform better, or last longer than a CPU running at 55°C.

Again, it is the case's responsibility to provide an adequate "flow" of cool air through the case. The CPU cooler need only toss the CPU's heat into that flow. And again, it is the user's responsibility to properly configure case cooling.

If AMD (and Intel) is to be blamed for anything, it should be for not making their processors more efficient so they don't waste so much energy in the form of heat. I suppose, for the time being, we can put some of the blame on the "laws of physics" for that too.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I already posted that before but this is my ITX with Ryzen and 1660Ti:
View attachment 207687

CPU: [email protected] + Noctua U12A, can be U12S with 2 fans, max temps in a closed case with AVX ~86°C
Case: Raijintek Metis Plus, costs ~$65 link they have also something like this but I think that Sliger has a better design - link
RAM: 16GB Dominator Plat RGB but can be anything 16GB or more if it's required ~$100+
GFX card: MSI GTX1660Ti OC - ~$275 but EVGA should fit too and short 2060 also but I don't recommend more than ~130W cards in ITX cases or they get noisy or throttle
PSU: Enermax 650W SFX ... can be any SFX like Corsair SF600 is great and runs passive up to 50%+ load ... SFX saves space and is lighter than ATX
Mobo: there is ASUS CH8 Impact but can be any ITX/DTX mobo

It's just an example of what I made.

To run higher wattage graphics card without noise or overheating you need a larger case like mATX or something with good airflow next to the GFX card. That vented Sliger case looks great but most others in ITX format will cause issues.
My experience with the Evolv Shift ... big, problems with reasonable coolers, bad airflow, every 130W+ graphics card is noisy.

Btw. AMD stock cooler can't even handle 3k Ryzens at stock without throttling. It causes the CPU to hit 95°C and throttle down but the user can't see how the CPU clock drops.

Looks like the cooler's exhaust fan lines up pretty well with the case's original exhaust fan hole.
 

Bill_Bright

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Location
Nebraska USA
What direction are those fans blowing? I'm wondering if pulling cool air in through that vent would be better rather than trying to push heated air out?