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Nifty Win 7 stuff for semi-noobs

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curtis1552

Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Location
Dayton, Ohio
Occasionally I'll see threads relating to "What's my worst component?"/"What should I upgrade?"
I know I wondered the same thing when I started looking to upgrade my system before I read tech forums on a daily basis.

Go to:
Control Panel > Performance Information and Tools

What is the Windows Experience Index?

The Windows Experience Index measures the capability of your computer's hardware and software configuration and expresses this measurement as a number called a base score. A higher base score generally means that your computer will perform better and faster than a computer with a lower base score, especially when performing more advanced and resource-intensive tasks.

Each hardware component receives an individual subscore. Your computer's base score is determined by the lowest subscore. For example, if the lowest subscore of an individual hardware component is 2.6, then the base score is 2.6. The base score is not an average of the combined subscores. However, the subscores can give you a view of how the components that are most important to you will perform, and can help you decide which components to upgrade.

You can use the base score to buy programs and other software that are matched to your computer's base score. For example, if your computer has a base score of 3.3, then you can buy any software designed for this version of Windows that requires a computer with a base score of 3 or lower.

The scores currently range from 1.0 to 7.9. The Windows Experience Index is designed to accommodate advances in computer technology. As hardware speed and performance improve, higher score ranges will be enabled. The standards for each level of the index generally stay the same. However, in some cases, new tests might be developed that can result in lower scores.
I thought it was neat and wanted to share.

Processor - RAM - Graphics - Gaming - HDD
My Server:
4.3 - 4.3 - 3.4 - 3.0 - 4.9
My Desktop:
4.8 - 4.5 - 3.4 - 3.9 - 5.9

I'm going to make a few points on this;
1. My server has two dual core processors at a higher Ghz (4 at 2.66 instead of 2 at 2.0). The real difference would be the system bus, server is old with 533Mhz and desktop is newer with 2000Mhz.
2. It has more RAM, though it is lower Mhz, so the scores can stay.
3. The 7200rpm SATA drive in my Desktop results in the higher score, Server has ATA (EIDE).
 
Last edited:

Know Nuttin

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2004
Location
Ontario, Canada
while that is true in general for the OCF community.... for a non-geek.... it's a good baseline as to what their computer is probably capable of.

My issue with WEI is that it doesn't give you what the baseline is. Is the baseline their minimum specs for running that OS? Or the recommended? is it a linear scale in that respect then? And it's weird that it stops at 7.9 as a max, whereas most people would assume it would go to 9.9 perhaps?
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
I believe the intent from MS was to use it as a way to grade the computer so that consumers could go to a store (brick and mortar or online) and use that score to compare against the software to see if their pc could run it. For example, a game may require a graphics score of say, 5 to play at recommended settings. Or this Graphics program may require a CPU score of 4 and HD score of 6 to work optimally.

However, that doesn't seem to have come to fruition.

What I've figured out on my own though, based on observations over the past few years with the WEI system.... is that if a system scores a 3.0-4.5, then it is an entry level system. a 4.5-5.5 is a mid level system, and above 5.5 or so, you are in the hi-range systems.
 

Crosshair

New Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Location
Fairfield, California
I think MS 's position here is to get asetup that can point out your weak components in order for you to get an idea of what you have. If your using Vista or Win 7 your stuff is already good enough. So its just a gauge for upgrading.
 

TollhouseFrank

Senior Headphone Guru
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Location
T3h [email protected]!
it was a good idea for what it was planned for.... but unfortunately.... it doesn't seem to have ever been given any serious consideration as to the indicator of your machine's performance by any of the good tech communities.
 

GIXXERGUY6

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Location
Northwest Ohio
yeah that tool is useless

my i7 920 clocked to 4.0 3gb ram 9800gtx+ 1.4tb space with 1.1 free

scored a 5.9 :D
I know I need more ram but that's just stupid :D
 

09CivicSI

Registered
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
Fort Rucker, Alabama Area
yeah that tool is useless

my i7 920 clocked to 4.0 3gb ram 9800gtx+ 1.4tb space with 1.1 free

scored a 5.9 :D
I know I need more ram but that's just stupid :D

And once you upgrade your ram, your HDD will bring the score down. Then your GPU.

I think WEI could be a lot more useful than it currently is. THFrank pointed out why that is and explained it quite well. Had it of translated to software indexed machine capabilities, it would be a lot more useful. It just never caught on though.

Still, for a noobish person to computers, that index can give them a visual reference as to what they need to upgrade next. They don't miss the lack of a baseline system because, quite frankly, they don't care enough about computers to wonder what that is compared to.

If you find yourself an active member of a community like this though, it's worthless to you. You have a desire to learn enough about computers to at least make those upgrade determinations without some WEI telling you what you need. I can tell you this though, that WEI gets some people interested in upgrading their computer on their own. Which in turn leads them to communities like this to become better informed.

So perhaps if nothing else, the WEI can be credited with that.:D
 

Know Nuttin

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2004
Location
Ontario, Canada
Still, for a noobish person to computers, that index can give them a visual reference as to what they need to upgrade next. They don't miss the lack of a baseline system because, quite frankly, they don't care enough about computers to wonder what that is compared to.

If you find yourself an active member of a community like this though, it's worthless to you. You have a desire to learn enough about computers to at least make those upgrade determinations without some WEI telling you what you need. I can tell you this though, that WEI gets some people interested in upgrading their computer on their own. Which in turn leads them to communities like this to become better informed.

So perhaps if nothing else, the WEI can be credited with that.:D

I don't know about that. Most of the noobish people that I meet (and I meet plenty on a daily basis) have no idea about WEI, what it means, and they really don't care. They judge their system not based on what MS tells them is their weakest link but they simply just say that it's slow when they do this, or do that. That, in itself, is what I think is the best measure of what is "weak" in a system.

Granted, it's easier for them to say this to someone who they feel is proficient with computers but many also say this to *gag* Futureshop/BestBuy employees also. Almost all of them never care enough about the technology to end up in a forum. They wouldn't even know what to enter into google as a search in these cases, lol. So many of them can only tell me who made their PC and not the model number, let alone the components inside.

Not to say that it couldn't be more but it isn't, and unless MS gets help from other's to push it, I can't see it being much more than what it is now.
 

09CivicSI

Registered
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
Fort Rucker, Alabama Area
I don't know about that. Most of the noobish people that I meet (and I meet plenty on a daily basis) have no idea about WEI, what it means, and they really don't care. They judge their system not based on what MS tells them is their weakest link but they simply just say that it's slow when they do this, or do that. That, in itself, is what I think is the best measure of what is "weak" in a system.

Granted, it's easier for them to say this to someone who they feel is proficient with computers but many also say this to *gag* Futureshop/BestBuy employees also. Almost all of them never care enough about the technology to end up in a forum. They wouldn't even know what to enter into google as a search in these cases, lol. So many of them can only tell me who made their PC and not the model number, let alone the components inside.

Not to say that it couldn't be more but it isn't, and unless MS gets help from other's to push it, I can't see it being much more than what it is now.

It never will be more than what it is now. MS already missed the ship on that one with Vista. That's when they should have been pushing it. I guess they probably could make it a better diagnostic tool, I just don't think they will.

I agree with you, most people hardly know the model. "Uh...it's this black looking box thingy that has 4megs of ram and 250gigs of memory. It doesn't play my games very well so I think you need to put me a bigger RAM in there so I can store more programs." That's what I usually get from civilians. And some military types too though.

But I've also had, ever since Vista came out and admittedly, more when Vista first launched than now, people asking me why their WEI was so low and what they could do to improve it because their computer isn't playing little Johnny's new game. But also, I live around mainly military people since I live in a military town. 90% of my friends are either active duty or retired military. We military folks tend to ask more questions and tend to try to figure it out for ourselves more so than the same segment of the civilian population IMHO.