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SOLVED Not keeping correct time

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ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Running Windows 7 x64, the time does not stay set at Pacific Time(UTC -8), it somehow gets reset to UTC, which is 8 hours too far in advance. I checked the time in the BIOS, it gets reset(somehow!)incorrectly to UTC as well. I have adjusted the time repeatedly in the BIOS, and in the OS.

What's happening here? BTW, I do dual boot with Linux, but the time in the Linux OS does not get changed from Pacific Time(UTC -8).

:shrug:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
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ihrsetrdr

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Time to change the cmos battery on your motherboard.

Well, this is a 6 year old motherboard, and the CMOS battery was the first possibility to come to mind.

However, if the CMOS battery were bad, wouldn't the date and time be reverting to something like "jan 1, 2010 12AM", instead of keeping the calender date(Jan 23,2017) correct, and advancing the day time by 8 hours?
 

mimart7

Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2011
Not necessarily so. The first symptoms, would be the computer keeping the incorrect time. Just replace the battery.
 

RJARRRPCGP

Member
Joined
May 30, 2004
Running Windows 7 x64, the time does not stay set at Pacific Time(UTC -8), it somehow gets reset to UTC, which is 8 hours too far in advance. I checked the time in the BIOS, it gets reset(somehow!)incorrectly to UTC as well. I have adjusted the time repeatedly in the BIOS, and in the OS.

What's happening here? BTW, I do dual boot with Linux, but the time in the Linux OS does not get changed from Pacific Time(UTC -8).

:shrug:

It's Linux. Linux does time differently.
 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
but the bios is still the same and I think both systems get time from the bios on boot.
 

RJARRRPCGP

Member
Joined
May 30, 2004
Can you elaborate on that, please?

Linux has a unique way of setting times. The BIOS time is the UTC time and for the Americas, it's subtracted by at least 4 hours.

Thus, the BIOS must be set by 5 or 4 hours ahead of your time in the U.S.

Thus, if you change the time yourself in the BIOS, you'll likely get the correct time in Windows, but the time in Linux will be wrong!
 
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ihrsetrdr

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Linux has a unique way of setting times. The BIOS time is the UTC time and for the Americas, it's subtracted by at least 4 hours.

Thus, the BIOS must be set by 5 or 4 hours ahead of your time in the U.S.

Thus, if you change the time yourself in the BIOS, you'll likely get the correct time in Windows, but the time in Linux will be wrong!


Actually, in my experience I've seen the reverse to be the case. I've been suspecting that with these UEFI BIOS' that perhaps the OS could change settings. Here's what Googling "UEFI" first points to:

The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is a specification that defines a software interface between an operating system and platform firmware.

But, this particular machine is running [email protected] in Windows 7, and rarely boots into Linux, yet I'll find the time needing reset back, usually from UTC to local time.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I wonder if you can find in the log when the system time settings were changed.. perhaps you can then find the culprit which does it?
 

habbajabba

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2005
Location
Oregon
What's interesting are the reg entries that point to the servers, easily editable they are. I always use D4 (dimension4) for time though. Too bad cmos bat's aren't simply rechargeable and part of the power plan.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I bought 100 cmos batteries recently off Amazon I think for like $10. They're good too. Used a couple of them already in old computers and they aren't dead. Couldn't believe it! If I go to RiteAid to get that same battery it's like $3.95 for one.
 
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ihrsetrdr

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Does that say 3V? or is it . 003? Im just not sure about the settings on that thing. 3V = OK anything below 1.5V is replacement territory (atkeast thats what they guy at the battery shop told me :) )

This Greenlee CMT-60 does not have any additional scale ranges, and there are no decimal places in the display, for the various voltages I've checked.

In an unrelated matter: I just replaced the PSU, which lost the +3.3v and the -5v.; was a 9yr. old Rosewill 650W, installed a EVGA SuperNOVA 550, which is serving the system nicely.

I still think that this Windows 7 OS Can interact with this UEFI BIOS, and change the time. Even though the system is set to sync with time.windows.com, and shows the timezone as "(UTC-08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada)", the time is ahead as if it were set to UTC. In the Linux OS the time is staying local(UTC -8).


Next weekend I'll replace the CMOS battery, just to eliminate that possibility for the incorrect time situation.
 

Suppressor1137

Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Either Windows, or Linux needs to stop trying to be the cool kid with special time calculations. Its kind of ridiculous that this is even a problem. Sorry to all you dual booters out there that have to deal with this shenanigans.
 
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ihrsetrdr

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
I changed out the CMOS battery, the one coming out of the machine also reads 3V:

2ndCMOS.jpg




I am booting/rebooting the machine between the 2 OS's, and into the BIOS as well. So far, IF I just boot to Windows, reboot and go into the BIOS the time holds true. However, when I reboot from Windows and boot into Linux, even though Linux time is correctly displayed as local time, when rebooting and going to the BIOS, the BIOS time setting has changed to UTC, which is 8 hours ahead of Pacific Time(here). :shrug:


I shall continue to test this machine.


Linux has a unique way of setting times. The BIOS time is the UTC time and for the Americas, it's subtracted by at least 4 hours.Thus, the BIOS must be set by 5 or 4 hours ahead of your time in the U.S.Thus, if you change the time yourself in the BIOS, you'll likely get the correct time in Windows, but the time in Linux will be wrong!

Either Windows, or Linux needs to stop trying to be the cool kid with special time calculations. Its kind of ridiculous that this is even a problem. Sorry to all you dual booters out there that have to deal with this shenanigans.


You guys maybe are on to something that I'm not aware of. :eek:
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Come to think of it, I have also run into this problem with time keeping in Linux vs. Windows. I had a test system that I would swap out system drives to either run Windows or Linux. I would always have to go into bios to correct the time after changing the drive. We know that an OS can mess with the bios settings because that's how overclocking software works.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Come to think of it, I have also run into this problem with time keeping in Linux vs. Windows. I had a test system that I would swap out system drives to either run Windows or Linux. I would always have to go into bios to correct the time after changing the drive. We know that an OS can mess with the bios settings because that's how overclocking software works.
I don't think so...

If I set something with ai suite or msi command center in windows, when I reboot, it goes back to whatever settings are in the bios unless I click 'apply settings Windows starts'.