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leb_crx

Registered
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Location
Ottawa, Canada
quick background...

learned programming since I been 14, Qbasic, than learned C, than kind of stoped for a bit, than took computer programming in college...anyways I learned java, C++, VB, cobol, cgi (a bit), and some jscript...

anyways now I am done college, what's next? I mean I dont want to talk smack but I flew through college, was a piece of cake, I had long nights like everyone else, but most of the stuff I found I flew right through

the job thing...meh dosent look like theres anything available to someone fresh out of college with teh way the IT is going now...so whatever I want to keep on learning while I do what I do...dont get me wrong I am gonna try and get a job, but not hold my breath

I am basically askin to see what most of you 'real' programmers done after school....did you start work right away or what?

also if any recommendations as to what I should learn, something I can actually use in the real world...it's all up in the air now, I pick up books either they are beginers and go on for 30 pages expaling what is a integer or it's so advanced the code makes no sence to me


bah I am ****ed off :mad: :mad: and confused
|eb_CRX
 

NookieN

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
The West
Sounds like you're a bit of a Windows programmer, which is fine. But if you're serious about getting a job in IT, you might want to build more UNIX programming skills. I'd definitely recommend picking up Perl (but that's just because I'm very partial to Perl). Even learning ksh or tcsh scripting can be helpful.

If you want to stick with Windows programming, you might want to learn the Windows API. Charles Petzold wrote the definitive book on that. There's also the fancy stuff like MFC (and more and more so, .NET), but those probably aren't important unless you want to get into application development.
 
OP
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leb_crx

Registered
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Location
Ottawa, Canada
thanks for the post, right now I am gonna concentrate on java, and than move onto openGl and see where that takes me

just fed up you know seems like everywhere I turn the door's ****in closed in my face...I just hope I find that open window :/

|eb_CRX
 

garwain

Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2002
Location
Quebec, Canada
I'd agree with perl or shell scripting to get your foot in the door in the unix world. PHP and/or ASP will help a lot in the web world. If you want to be a windows developer, I'd learn how to work with the windows API, and maybe learn delphi as well.

One thing I'd really suggest you study up would be SQL. The openings may not be too visable right now, but they are out there. If you can work with a DB (forget access, go for sybase, MSSQL, MYSQL, PostGreSQL type stuff) and you can develop an application frontend, then there are plenty of openings, you just have to find them.

When I finished college (same as you, I found it a breeze. I would have the comp work done in no time, but would spend the late nights working on the other stuff), I found a job easily. My trick was to get a list of all the companys in my area, and look for places that sounded like they dealt heavily with computers. picked a couple of them, and contacted them. the first place took a while to get back to me, but I got a job there integrating systems. If you are good at what you do, then it's not your computer skills that are preventing you from getting a job, it's your job hunting skills that are the problem. The visible market is slow right now, but the hidden market is still wide open. You have to face it that the software giants arn't looking to take on the expenses of hiring a junior programmer, but the smaller companys are still looking for a general computer guy to look after their network, servers, db, develop frontend programs, and reports, automate annoying/repetitive tasks, etc.
 

Rakk

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2002
Location
UK
I'd agree with Garwain there. Getting some solid SQL skills are essential and it's not at all difficult.

Because times are a little tough you'll have to work that bit harder to get a job but it's by no means impossible. Your enthusiasm for your subject sounds top notch but as you said yourself you're in no rush to get a job and that's the problem - jobs very rarely land on your lap and usually the only way you'll get one is to go out and search, a lot.
One tip I can give you is to look around your local companies as Garwain says and then if you get an interview offer to do a couple of days work for free as a way of showing them what you can do. If you're personable and your work is good once you've shared a few coffee breaks with them they will be very likely to offer you a job as they'll feel like they know you a bit.

Good luck!
 
OP
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leb_crx

Registered
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Location
Ottawa, Canada
wow great posts, thanks guys, garwain, I am gonna try what you said, also rakk tooo the volunteering thing, thanks a bunch guys!!!!!!!!!!

as for SQL, thanks to my luck, my DB teacher ended up never going to class, adn passed everyone...yippee, so now I have the pleasure of learning it on my own...but I plan on learning it and I have realized the importance of it...looks like everything uses it now almost...well in one way or the next

thanks guys....and specific, couldnt agree with you more...I knew it all along, but I need that piece of paper right...fawk if I had listenede to everyone that told me 'go to university, college sux, wont get you anywhere'....but now what can you do....hopefully your suggestions lead me to finding a good job :D

Thanks again,
|eb_CRX
 

Hawk

Member
Joined
May 9, 2002
Location
Portland OR.
Keep your mind open, don't limit your self. Companies are looking for good minds. If you did well in school companies will hire and train you. You never know where it might lead. This is what happened to me
I was a high school drop out and worked as a logger and in construction for 17 years. I hurt my back and had to find something to do. Went and got a degree in electronics engineering. When I finished I started looking for a job doing what ever. I found work with an engineering company (in 2 weeks) as an architectural designer making pretty good $'s because of my CAD skills. I had put in a resume with intel for an Industrial Engineer during college. A year later they called me to interview and I took the job. I work in a very exciting job that I would have never dreamed of a few years ago. Keep your chin up and go conquer the world
my 4 cents