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OC a Dell?

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unwrittenLaw

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2002
Location
San Diego
Anyone know if its possible to do any kind of oc'in on a Dell Dimension 8100? I think the mobo is an intel..but its proprietary i believe..The BIOS has very little options..Could I use an Intel Bios instead of Dell's, or would that not even matter if the mobo is all locked down..?

Thanks
 

Kid Payne

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2002
Location
Big Apple
I dont think the Dells have any type of overclock options. I looked hard and my dimension 4100 doesnt in bios or the board. I have never used any other BIOS except for Dell's, but now that you mentioned it, I'm gonna look around.
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
I think you could overclock the fsb using the program CPUFSB, but you'd need to know the clock generator on the mobo.
 

Kid Payne

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2002
Location
Big Apple
Tipycol, I forgot about CPUFSB. I downloaded it about a month ago, but I didnt have the time to figure it out. I'm gonna try it as soon as I get the time and patience. Thanks for reminding me :)
 

Beavis

Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2002
Location
Austin, Texas
Judging by how quiet the new Dells are I would be weary of trying to overclock it. They probably built them where the temps are barely cool enough to run at stock speeds. Check your temps and make sure there is room to overclock.
 

Kid Payne

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2002
Location
Big Apple
Beavis, you made a good point. Dells are very quiet.My dimension does not have an intake fan and it did not have a fan on the HS. All it had was a duct from the exaust fan.

The mobo might not have temp monitoring. Add a new HSF if it doesnt have a fan on the HS and use CPUFSB carefully if you're going to use it at all.
 

beau_safken

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2002
Location
San Francisco CA
Assuming you dont mind voiding the warrenty, crack the case and add a 120mm...

However, IF you wanted to buy a computer without a warrenty why didn't yea build one instead...

The passive cooling that Dell uses is just above point of failure for sure. My girlfriends Dell burt me finger when I touched the heatsink...So drop a fan and use CPUFSB and go slow you'll do fine
 

Vovan

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2001
Location
Germany
Anyone know if its possible to do any kind of oc'in on a Dell Dimension 8100? I think the mobo is an intel..but its proprietary i believe..The BIOS has very little options..


Forget it... It is too corporative mix!
-> trash ;)
 
OP
unwrittenLaw

unwrittenLaw

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2002
Location
San Diego
The cooling in my dimension seems ok...i bought it a couple yrs ago before I knew how to build my own...so I was just seein if I could tweak it a bit..Can that CPUFSB program do permanent damage?

Thanks
 

Tipycol

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
unwrittenLaw said:
The cooling in my dimension seems ok...i bought it a couple yrs ago before I knew how to build my own...so I was just seein if I could tweak it a bit..Can that CPUFSB program do permanent damage?

Thanks


Think it'd do the same damage that'd a regular raise in fsb from the bios would do, corrupt harddrive, ruined pci/agp cards, etc.


Tipycol
 

PyroDragon

Registered
Joined
Aug 13, 2002
Location
Florida
yes, dell uses intel based boards and, yes, they are proprietarty. thats how they make them so cheeply, nothing extra on the board, only what they want. i'm not sure i'd want to try ocing a dell, though not for the voiding of the warranty reason. it's not like their tech support is all that great anyway... you could overclock it i guess. probibly have to change clock generators, and unless you are REALLY comfortable soldering parts on PCBs, I just wouldn't do it.

PyroDragon :cool:
 

Ugmore Baggage

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2002
Manufacturers of assembled PCs rarely buy anything they don't absolutely have to. The models they choose (even of name brands) are the absolute worst they can find. They work ok at default settings but when it comes to overclocking only the specialist models are really up for the task. Usually OEM systems also have less upgrade potential, with power supplies matched exactly to power requirements, integrated components, few PCI slots, and minimal BIOS settings and jumpers.

Remember
1. overclocking is at your own risk
2. chances are if you break an OEM system you'll have to replace all or most of it.
3. OEM systems are made from OEM parts. They're designed for profit, not stress.