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Official "I lapped my stuff and didn't take any pics" thread! ;)

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Capitalizt

Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
sorry no pics, but I thought I'd share my lapping results with yall..

system:

Asus P5B (basic)
E6600 (8X333 = 2.66ghz)
Zalman 7700 fan

Pre-lapping temps were roughly 27-29 idle, 46-50 load. Ambient temperature 24C (76F)

I decided to go with 600, 800, 1000, and 1500 for the lapping job (bought it at Autozone)

After removing the Zalman, I noticed the thermal paste had a HUGE gap going straight down the middle from top to bottom of the CPU. I had no idea what this meant (my first computer build). The bottom of the heatsink was very polished and reflective, but it had a very slight curve in it's shape, so I figured it wasn't making good contact with the processor.

I followed the lapping method prescribed the forums--taping the sandpaper to a flat piece of glass, and rotating the heatink 90 degrees every 10 strokes. After roughly 45 minutes, I was done...The bottom wasn't a perfect mirror, but it looked much flatter which is the whole idea behind lapping. After applying a paper-thin layer of Arctic Silver 5 with a razor blade, I remounted the heatsink and booted up.

Much to my disappointment, NO CHANGE IN TEMPS! Arrrg...$20 down the drain...What went wrong?

So I decided to try again...popped the Zalman off, and what do I see? The same HUGE chunk of empty space down the middle of the CPU...WTF?

Obviously the problem was not with the heatsink...but with the processor itself. Now I was SCARED TO DEATH to touch the CPU...I had no idea how to lap such a skinny thing (what to hold on to?), but I said fark it...NO GUTS NO GLORY! And out it came.. Being careful not to touch the gold pins on the bottom, I held all four corners of the CPU and used the same lapping method as before (one piece of advice--put band-aids on your fingertips BEFORE you lap a CPU...because you won't feel your skin rubbing away until it's too late...ouch!)

The 600 grit really made a big difference. It was obvious there was a huge camel "hump" on the processor. The copper color came through the middle almost immediately, but it took 3 full pieces of sandpaper and 20 minutes to erase the last bit of the gray metal from the 4 corners of the CPU. I probably took 1/4cm off that sucker just to get a flat surface.. After finishing up with the higher grits, I cleaned it with a lint-free cloth, reapplied AS5, and gave it another try.

BOOYAH! 3 degrees lower! Idle temps are now around 25C, and load around 45-46C.

Lesson learned: If you are going to lap something, GO ALL THE WAY! The only way to ensure proper (perfectly flat) contact is to lap the heatsink AND the CPU. A flat heatsink will do you little good if you have "humps" or "valleys" on your processor. Be careful, take your time, and enjoy the lower temps!
 

Hazaro

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
That's right, the problem was not with my HS, but with my processor, mine was concave however instead, took quite a while.

More stories please :)
 

bing

Low Profile Senior
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Location
Indonesia
Protecting CPU before lapping tips !

Capitalizt said:
........
.......... Now I was SCARED TO DEATH to touch the CPU...I had no idea how to lap such a skinny thing (what to hold on to?), but I said fark it...NO GUTS NO GLORY! And out it came.. Being careful not to touch the gold pins on the bottom, I held all four corners of the CPU and used the same lapping method as before (one piece of advice--put band-aids on your fingertips BEFORE you lap a CPU...because you won't feel your skin rubbing away until it's too late...ouch!)

Great job ! You must be very happy ! :clap: ;)

Now about tips on protecting and making cpu easier to hold :

1. Use the cpu black cap to close those gold pins beneath it as it's originally shipped with.

2. Use sticky tapes to cover all 4 sides, never mind when some of the tapes stuck at the IHS, they will gone after few strokes on rough grit. :) Oh yeah, use the tape that doesn't easily leave those sticky gunk on surface when they pulled out.

3. Cut some styro foam about the size of that cpu and put it above those black cap that protect the cpu, and again, another tape job to make the styro form stick well on the back of the cpu. Just roll the tape circling the sandwitched cpu, cap and foam ! Remember, choose sticky tape that won't leave stick gunk, most car painter workshop use them alot !

The purpose of this foam is to protect the "whole" back side of that cpu, and those several tiny caps on it, and it will serves really well for hand holding area and give a good place to firmly hold and push the cpu against the sandpaper with evenly spreaded force. And those tape's job apart from holding that 3 parts, is also to isolate the cpu well on wet sanding.

Also another advantage is for CPU with pins like AMD or older Intel, those styrofoam will reduce the risk of bent pins since they're all stabbed and held firmly inside it.

My suggestion is, do it again on the CPU since by holding "only" at their corner, the pressure may not that even, maybe few degrees more ? :D
 
Last edited:

Spawn-Inc

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
i found it way easier to lap smaller things, i just bought a Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro and tried lapping it and it keep tipping. did you use water?it helps the sand paper last longer (if its the wet and dry kind).i lapped my old Intel Pentium 4 1.6GHz socket 478 and i dropped temps about 3-4 degrees.
 
OP
C

Capitalizt

Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
I thought water's purpose was to make the components glide over the paper better, but since I never had any problem with the friction, I didn't use any. If it really makes the paper last longer, I'll definitely use it next time.

And thanks for the suggestion on taping styrofoam on the CPU. That probably would have helped my thumbs ;)
 

Hazaro

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Ooh yeah, the HS tipped all over the place, use a very strong grip on the base and try to push down the force on the center to keep it upright. (I cut my hand holding my Zalman's fins)
 

bing

Low Profile Senior
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Location
Indonesia
Wetted paper will reduce that "tippings" alot ! :)

And it helps on finer grid paper too cause the micro debris will flatten out those rough surface at the paper quickly when on dry lapping.
 
OP
C

Capitalizt

Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
I actually sat on the ground in front of the couch with my legs bent, and put the glass slab on my knees at a 45 degree angle. I found this made it MUCH easier to get smooth strokes with the heatsink, without the "stuttering" or "tilting" problems of doing it on the ground.

The glass stays perfectly flat either way, so as long as you do it properly, you should get the same results.

Worked for me at least ;)
 

Spawn-Inc

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
here is my first ever lapped processor. it was a old junk one so i wanted to see what the fuss was about, now i lap everything i got, also i get free sand paper up to 2500 grit from work.

2000 grit max without polish
2742162550100511463S600x600Q85.jpg


2777628280100511463S600x600Q85.jpg


with polish

2324547370100511463S600x600Q85.jpg


2702972650100511463S600x600Q85.jpg


i will probably lap my Q6600 depending on temps with the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro.
 

Hipcrostino

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Location
Canberra, Australia
I use a straight edge ruler to see if the IHS is flat or not. Mine was flatter than a tack (ever notice the saying "flat as a tack" makes no sences as tacks are convecs?) so i didn't bother. Anyway, i lapped my HS, which needed it badly. It was a horrible surface. I will probably lap my Q6600 when i get it too, if it needs it.
 

jellysandwich

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2007
Capitalizt said:
I actually sat on the ground in front of the couch with my legs bent, and put the glass slab on my knees at a 45 degree angle. I found this made it MUCH easier to get smooth strokes with the heatsink, without the "stuttering" or "tilting" problems of doing it on the ground.

The glass stays perfectly flat either way, so as long as you do it properly, you should get the same results.

Worked for me at least ;)

do u ... tape the glass to ur knees?
 

ToeKneeATX

Registered
Joined
Oct 23, 2001
Hazaro said:
:eek:

*Looks back at thread title*

*faints*

i have lapped my thermalright u120 extreme and forgot to take pics also. i may be lapping my q6600 this weekend and will be sure to take pics :D
 

jason4207

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2005
Location
Concord, NC
Capitalizt said:
After applying a paper-thin layer of Arctic Silver 5 with a razor blade, I remounted the heatsink and booted up.

Much to my disappointment, NO CHANGE IN TEMPS! Arrrg...$20 down the drain...What went wrong?

I don't think you're supposed to spread the AS5 w/ a razor blade. A dab in the middle will do. Check out the Arctic Silver website for specific instructions for your CPU.
 
OP
C

Capitalizt

Registered
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
jason4207 said:
I don't think you're supposed to spread the AS5 w/ a razor blade. A dab in the middle will do. Check out the Arctic Silver website for specific instructions for your CPU.

Sorry that just seems really silly to me. Even if the dot gets spread out a bit by the weight of the heatink, there is no way it can cover the entire surface of the heat spreader..

Using a razor blade and the "Paint the fence" motion, I got a super smooth, paper thin layer over the entire CPU. It seems obvious that this will do a better job transferring heat than a blob (or line) in the middle..
 

bing

Low Profile Senior
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Location
Indonesia
Its better to stop this energy wasting arguments on which method is the best when applying TIM to CPU or heastink.

Since no one ever mentioned that they saw how the TIM was spreaded when putting the heatsink on or when tightening it, and also no one ever claimed that they do have have x-ray vision to see through that thick cooper/al metal right ? he..he..

Now, use this magic tool & training :D, then you'll have that x-ray vision and trust me, after you graduated from that trainings, :D you can make your own style on applying a TIM and yet still yields best result ! LOL :D
 

jason4207

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2005
Location
Concord, NC
Capitalizt said:
Sorry that just seems really silly to me. Even if the dot gets spread out a bit by the weight of the heatink, there is no way it can cover the entire surface of the heat spreader..

Using a razor blade and the "Paint the fence" motion, I got a super smooth, paper thin layer over the entire CPU. It seems obvious that this will do a better job transferring heat than a blob (or line) in the middle..

I wouldn't call it obvious. It seems more likely that you'll introduce air bubbles when doing the paint-the-fence method.

I really have no evidence either way. I just know Arctic Silver has directions and for some CPU/GPU's it says to spread the paste, and for some it says to blob or make a line. I assume they've tested various methods, and have reached this conclusion somehow.

It seems you've already read the directions, and have made your own conclusions, though, so to each their own. As long as your temps are good, and your OC is high it doesn't really matter.

Here's 1 on me: :beer:
 

shirker

Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2007
Location
VA
Kuroimaho said:
Yes that's ok it gives you 2C, but how do you sell it afterwards ? ;)
that's the only reason that would keep me from lapping a new, expensive cpu :-/