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Ok so I want cheep water cooling

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Bender

Mysteriously Changing Senior
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
In Thelemac's Basement Eating the Chickens
I really don't want to spend a lot on my first water cooled setup but I still want some good performance. I am thinking of an aluminum waterblock to start out with since it is so cheep. What do you think? Or should I spend $30 and get a coper one? BeCooling also has a dual radiator for 2 120mm fans; its only $20 so I think I'll go with that. As for a pump I'll go for a Rule 500 gph $10-15. I don't know what to use for a resivoar yet but I'll find something around the house. 2cooltek.com has a very enticing aluminum hold down device that won't crush my core. The setup should only cost me about $60. Any inexpensive ideas to improve my tentative plans?

Am I stupid for wanting a watercooled system, or will it really preform better than my pep66. My duron is pumping out a ton of heat [email protected] 2.11v so maby it is a good solution. I wold really appreciate any tidbit of help you have to offer. Duron [email protected] here we come!
 

Shadow ÒÓ

Mod in Hiding
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Pensacola, Florida USA
it's definitely better than air cooling, but are you running on the high side now and want to go even further? If you're running cool now and don't intend to OC more, why upgrade?

That pump is a little extreme in my opinion........be prepared to throttle it back a bit.

Copper blocks are superior to alum, but you can build alum blocks from OEM sinks easily. Can't get much cheaper than that. (free)
 
OP
Bender

Bender

Mysteriously Changing Senior
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
In Thelemac's Basement Eating the Chickens
Yup I want to overclock the old duron 600 to 1200. It's a lofty goal but someone has to double there clock rate once and a while. Right now with a pep66 I am only 100mhz away from my goal. My current temps are HOT 58 degrees fully maxed out. Idle temps are around 53-54. Still it isn't to bad considering the 2.11 volts that I'm pumping into it.

I am planning on running the pump from my psu since it is 12v dc. Maybe I should get a Rule 360 gph instead.

I really want a professional looking setup, one that is as reliable as aircooling. How reliable can watercooling be?
 

stool

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Albany, NY
Watercooling is extremely reliable, and extremely consistant. The only real worry if everything is properly connected is pump failure, and from what I have read, quality pumps will last a couple of years at 24/7 use. Personally, I have the water flow visually in sight, so I would know immediately if the pump were not circulating. I think once you take the plunge to watercooling, you'll never go back.
 

bdf24

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
Harford, WI.
I have to agree!

I have been running my watercooling for around a month or two now. My system definenitly runs more stable. it dropped my temps in half as far as idle and load.

My pump is a Rio 200gph inline pump and seems to work pretty good. Along with a 12" x 5" x 3\4" Radiator, I'm running an aluminum waterblock as well. Right now my block is one I got from work a while ago. It's a bit big and bulky and I dont think the water has enough surface area thru the block. So my temps are higher then they should be. So I ordered another block from Tom leufkens, as well as a copper cold plate. I think this will drop my temps even more.

Also if you want to save a little money and hassel. Run a closed loop system without a reservoir. Thats what I do. It's nice not to have to worry about where to fit a reservoir, or have to worry about it leaking or spilling. And as far as temps go there is'nt really any difference. Of course you will need an inline pump.

Good Luck and have fun with it!
 

J-dogg

Registered
Joined
Apr 3, 2001
Shadow ÒÓ (May 28, 2001 07:07 p.m.):
it's definitely better than air cooling, but are you running on the high side now and want to go even further? If you're running cool now and don't intend to OC more, why upgrade?

That pump is a little extreme in my opinion........be prepared to throttle it back a bit.

Copper blocks are superior to alum, but you can build alum blocks from OEM sinks easily. Can't get much cheaper than that. (free)

Shadow,

How's everything? Thanks again for the advice the other day.

Can you elaborate on how to build a block using the OEM sink?........or point me in the right direction? Thanks in advance!

BTW......I just found a class offered through the local school district for A+ certification.....FREE!! Cool!

J-dogg
 

Shadow ÒÓ

Mod in Hiding
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Pensacola, Florida USA
Photopoint is shutting down it's free service, and that's who hosted all of my pics. Sorry I don't have many to post, but if this doesn't make sense to you, just buzz me and I'll take some.

Take a stock heat sink and cut the fins from the middle. Leaving only a U shaped sink. Cover the 3 sides in alum........put 2 nipples in one end, and you've got an instant water block.

At the time I didn't have a dremmel, and can guarntee you can do it all with a file, hack saw and JB Weld.

I do have one horrible pic, but it'll give you some idea.

[img=[URL]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=96108&a=13121980&p=49588175&Sequence=0&res=high[/URL]]

or

[img=[URL]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=96108&a=13121980&p=49588176&Sequence=0&res=high[/URL]]

Extend one tube inside the block...to help circulation.

[img=[URL]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=96108&a=13121980&p=49588187&Sequence=0&res=high[/URL]]
 

ken257

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Shadow: I like the block you made out of an old stock sink. One thing I was thinking about that could make a nice improvement to the idea is to only cut out maybe every other fin. With the ones that are left remove a little bit from alternating ends to create a maze pattern.
 

mudguts

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2001
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
If you wanna start out cheap Bender and have some fun, I agree with Shadow...roll your own! This is how I started out, experimenting and improvising. This is a pic of my first homemade water block and it cost me next to nothing. The only diffence between mine and Shadows is that I used Lexan and epoxy. It worked quite well although it was a little tall which made it difficult to mount. One thing I included by a friends suggestion, was a baffle to direct the water downward over the fins. My second block was a little better and I think I'll start a thread tomorrow entitled " Post your homemade waterblock pics".
 

mudguts

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2001
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Also , I used this solvent especially made for plastics. It flows into fine cracks nicely and sorta welds the plastic together unlike epoxy. I was told at the plastics shop that this is the stuff that is used on aquariums so you know it seals well!