• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Overclockable?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

funnyperson1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2001
well if you want a good overclock i would suggest a globalwin Vos32 if its a Slot1 or if its PPGA then even something cheap like a Gorb or a VolcanoII should be enough...
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
What about an AMD Athlon retail heatsink that is made for a 1.4 ghz. Would that work, i havent tried but it looks like the clip would fit on the lugs easily.
 

funnyperson1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2001
subconcept said:
What about an AMD Athlon retail heatsink that is made for a 1.4 ghz. Would that work, i havent tried but it looks like the clip would fit on the lugs easily.

yes that would probably be very good specially if you apply some ASIII and take that AMD crap off the bottom....expect to hit around 5-550mhz max though...unless you get a real beast
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
Thanks, im gonna see what I can do. ive never really overclocked before ( i feel so embaressed being here and saying that) so im going to do my reading tonight.

Thanks funnyperson1
 

donny_paycheck

Inactive Super Quad Mod
Joined
Oct 25, 2001
subconcept said:
Thanks, im gonna see what I can do. ive never really overclocked before ( i feel so embaressed being here and saying that) so im going to do my reading tonight.

Thanks funnyperson1

Don't be embarassed, you're here to learn! And we'd like to think we can teach you something too.

A stock HS should let you raise the clock speed by 10% minimum, unless the thing is TOTAL crap, but I doubt that's the case. Still though, if you want to do a decent job then go with funnyperson1's advice.
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
thanks donny_paycheck

dont even know where to start when it comes to oc'ing hehe.
say i wanted to oc it from 433 to 500, what would I do?

what settings in the bios do I have to change?

i always see people post their multiplyier settings beside their names, what is that?
 

funnyperson1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2001
donny_paycheck said:


Don't be embarassed, you're here to learn! And we'd like to think we can teach you something too.

A stock HS should let you raise the clock speed by 10% minimum, unless the thing is TOTAL crap, but I doubt that's the case. Still though, if you want to do a decent job then go with funnyperson1's advice.

well thats the thing, this is an AMD stock heatsink looks comparable to a Volcano II which would be overkill for an old Celly PPGA.....i think it may actually be better than a blorb...
 

donny_paycheck

Inactive Super Quad Mod
Joined
Oct 25, 2001
subconcept said:
thanks donny_paycheck

dont even know where to start when it comes to oc'ing hehe.
say i wanted to oc it from 433 to 500, what would I do?

what settings in the bios do I have to change?

i always see people post their multiplyier settings beside their names, what is that?

No problem.

Look to the front page of the site for the basics of how to overclock a processor i.e. what is involved.

The multiplier determines the processor's internal clock frequency by multiplying the bus frequency by whatever it's value is. For example, a 500mhz CPU like yours would have a multiplier of 5x. This would make it run at 500mhz internally because it has a bus speed of 100mhz, and 100x5=500....see? So if you could raise the multiplier to 5.5 then it would run at 550mhz. You can also change the bus speed to overclock the processor because many modern CPUs have their multipliers locked at a fixed value internally and they cannot be changed. You can circumvent this by raising the bus speed. If you raised the bus speed on your 500mhz processor to 110mhz then it would run at 550mhz because 5x110=550. This is harder to do because unlike the multiplier, which just determines the internal frequency of the processor, the bus frequency is the speed at which all the components in the system run. This means your DRAM, graphics, NIC, sound card and even disk drives must be up to snuff or they will hold you back. The advantage to raising the bus speed is that it speeds up the whole system, not just the CPU. You don't get bottlenecks this way and everything runs faster, not just the CPU. A 700mhz processor with a 100mhz bus would get spanked by a 667mhz processor with a 133mhz bus, especially in things that are memory intensive because DRAM is most greatly affected by front side bus overclocks.

Since your CPU has it's multiplier locked internally, your only option is to overclock via the front side bus. To do this, you need to figure out where to change the FSB (front side bus) frequency. Start in CMOS setup. Poke around and look for a FSB speed adjustment. It probably won't be there because I'm betting your motherboard is an older model although I'm not even vaguely familiar with it. If there are no settings in CMOS then open up your case and look at the motherboard itself. Look for hardware jumper blocks marked with something like BUS SPEED or SYSTEM BUS...etc. Anything with the word BUS will be of interest here. Note the position of the jumper if you find it (you probably will) and raise it to the next notch. Turn on your computer and see what happens! If it crashes early on, look for a voltage adjustment for the processor's voltage. Raise that one by one notch and try again. You'll sometimes need to raise the voltage to get stable with an oc and this is where thermal management comes into play. A hotter CPU will be less stable under load and in extreme cases may damage itself, so make sure you have good cooling. The Athlon heat sink will chill that thing nicely.

This should give you an idea of where to start, but the front page of overclockers will tell you tons. There are lots of great articles there to read and you can learn volumes. Hope this helps...
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
thanks alot that cleared a lot of things up. im gonna check the front page now and do some more reading.

Thanks alot donny_paycheck appritiate the time you took to explain that to me.
 

-=UR=- Ranger

Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2001
Location
Giessen, Germany
If I'm not completey wrong, your CPU uses a FSB of 66 and a multiplier of 7. You can't change the multiplier on Celerons, so you might wan't to set you FSB to something like 75 at first. Boot Windows, test if it is stable and than go on. 75 FSB should give you 525 MHZ. Which should be quite doable. Perhaps, if your System seems not to be completely stable, you might wan't to increase voltage a little. But be sure to watch your temps when doing this. Try to keep them at below 45 degrees and you should be fine.
Hope that helps
 

donny_paycheck

Inactive Super Quad Mod
Joined
Oct 25, 2001
I always forget when Intel went from the 66mhz bus to 100mhz!

Well, you will be able to figure that out. As for a good guide to overclocking, check out the guide that batboy wrote. I don't know the link (maybe somebody reading this does and will post it) but you can find it in Tips & Techniques -> Beginner Guides -> Overclocking Basic Training. It'll tell you tons...most of what I said above, but lots more, and all in greater detail. Check it out.
 

funnyperson1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2001
donny_paycheck said:
I always forget when Intel went from the 66mhz bus to 100mhz!

Well, you will be able to figure that out. As for a good guide to overclocking, check out the guide that batboy wrote. I don't know the link (maybe somebody reading this does and will post it) but you can find it in Tips & Techniques -> Beginner Guides -> Overclocking Basic Training. It'll tell you tons...most of what I said above, but lots more, and all in greater detail. Check it out.

the first 100mhz bus Celeron was the 800, the first 100mhz PIII was the 450, the first 100mhz PII was the 300?......
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
Ill look intr oc'ing the fsb. but i have a 5400 13 gb, 2 nic cards, a tnt2, and a scsi card on this, Will I be in risk of damaging the components. donny_paycheck said that when i raise the fsb it speeds up the whole system
 
OP
subconcept

subconcept

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Toronto, Canada
my mom just told me she dosnt want it overclocked because her main concern is stability. I think I feel a little friday night project coming on when my parents go out this friday. hehehe.