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Overclocking 2.4c

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Avrum

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Jul 5, 2004
Recently, I have been experimenting with overclocking my P4 2.4c.

I was able to boost it to 3.0 and, while burn-it and other diagnositics were successful, there were frequent lockups during system use.

After getting fed up with the freezing, I lowered it to 2.8, and it seems stable at this clockspeed.

HOWEVER -- i should mention that i've been using my motherboard's (ASUS deluxe 875) default overclocking settings -- sortof an overclocking for dummies approach. I simply choose the percent I wish to increase and it does the rest.

I think that i'd be able to get higher stable speeds if I handled the settings myself (namely, the RAM timing).

Can someone suggest good settings for a 2.4 c to get the best possible performance boost? ...and a brief explanation of the steps to implement these settings?

Thanks,
Avrum
 
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Avrum

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Jul 5, 2004
Btw -- here are my system specs:

P4 2.4c
ASUS deluxe 875 mobo
768 ddr400 ram
ATI radeon 9800 XT
Case has adequate cooling --> CPU idle temp is 28-29, full load stabilizes at 30-33
CPU is directly cooled with large copper Zalman heatsink+fan
 
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Roboman101

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Oct 22, 2002
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you want to leave your ram timings at stock for now, and just increase the fsb, it should be at 200 now, slowly increase it to whatever it needs to be at for say 2800 or 3000 (multiplyer times the fsb gets your speed)

leave the ram speed divider on auto for now that way you don't have to worry bout your ram crapping out, if your processor stalls then give it 25 thousandths of a volt more, and repeate
 
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Avrum

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Roboman101 said:
then give it 25 thousandths of a volt more, and repeate

Do you increase the voltage in the bios?
What is "too high" (voltage-wise)
 
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Avrum

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Jul 5, 2004
Also -- i consistently (even when i'm not overclocking) get a warning that complains about the +- 3.3 V
 

Drop-Top

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Oct 9, 2003
Location
Minneapolis, MN
I didn't notice a power supply in your earlier post. if you have a generic PSU or a name brand type with to low of wattage you will have issues when you OC. When you raise the voltage to your proc it will pull more from the PSU and if it can't handle it, it will cause instability issues. I also wouldn't go much higher than 1.65v, that seems to be the staple on the boards, however some say 1.6v. I personally couldn't get any better results from 1.6v to 1.65v so it didn't matter in my case.
 

Jarlax

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Aug 14, 2003
Location
Asylum
My setup is somewhat similar to yours so you can try what I did and see how it goes. I dropped my memory divider to 5:4, pushed my volts to 1.575, and then started upping my front side bus in levels of 5. Doing this and playing with memory timings I was able to get my rig solid at 275 FSB (12 x 275=3300).

I have tried upping my vcore further (all the way up to 1.7) but it does not seem to make a difference. 1.575 is as solid as 1.6, 1.625, 1.65, etc.

I am stuck now at 3.2-3.3 and cannot figure out how to get past this point. But above all I am stable. The AI overclocking is crap and resulted in some pretty poor performance when I played with it. Try doing it manually and see what your rig can do!
 
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Avrum

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Jul 5, 2004
Thank you -- this is exactly what I was looking for.
 
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Avrum

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One question though -- you mentioned "playing with your memory timings" -- can you elaborate on this?
 

Roboman101

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Oct 22, 2002
Location
south dakota
like changing the cas latency, and the other numbers, and making them smaller to improve memory performance
it is done in the bios, under chip config, or memory config
 

Jarlax

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Aug 14, 2003
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Asylum
Like Roboman101 said, the options are under your advance-> chipset menu options.

I am no expert at these timings by any means so I recommend checking out the memory section for more info. Basically there are 5 numbers to set. In my case my numbers in order (going down the list in my asus boards BIOS menu) are 2-3-3-6 8.

I know that the last number (the 8) can either be set 4 or 8 and has to do with the number of things it does per cycle. In this case 8 means better performance than 4. But in all other cases the lower the number the better you are. This is one area where each individual will have to play with their own memory and see what their chips can do.

It takes time and can be boring but it is all part of the OC'ing path. Hope that helps a little and be sure to post your results for us.
 
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Avrum

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Jul 5, 2004
Thanks. Greatly appreciated. Will post results.

BTW -- one last question, considering that my case temp remains within tolerance (below 48, we'll say) can overclocking damage other components?
 

Roboman101

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Oct 22, 2002
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south dakota
well, if you want to be technical, overclocking could fry your processor, corrupt hard drives, and destroy your motherboard, but that is being paranoid, but if your temps stay bellow say 45 you will be fine
 

Jarlax

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Aug 14, 2003
Location
Asylum
Of course there is the risk of damaging your system by pushing past the recommended levels. But if you take it slow watching your temps and how your system is responding then you should be fine. Afterall, this forum is made up of hundreds of people who overclock without issues!