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Overclocking i5 8625u (help)

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Carisio

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Hello guys! First time posting here! Glad to be part of it! =)

I've just bought a new note with an i5 8265u and I want to overclock it the right way.
Here are the specifications:

i5.png

In the Intel site it says:

Base Frequency: 1,6GHz - Max Frequency: 3,9GHz
TDP: 15W - Max Configurable TDP: 25W

I have tried some options on the ThrottleStop 8.70 and I'm not sure if it is working. I've changed the SET MULTIPLIER to 2.2 and have whatched the temps to check the max it goes up. The results is around 90-93ºC. And playing some games it keeps around 80ºC. I don't know if I have to undervolt and how to config it the right way so if you guys can help me I'd be so grateful.

When I run Limit Reasons the THERMAL, EDP OTHER and PL1 goes RED sometimes. I don't know if it can be dangerous to my CPU.

I have tried to set it right to play DAYZ, and sometimes my pc get some good results, reaching 50-60 fps, but sometimes it goes really bad, downgrading to 19-30 fps. I don't understand why this difference is so high playing the same game.

What do you suggest me?

Really thank you!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I suggest you not overclock a laptop. It cannot keep the PCU cool enough. The THERMAL note you seeing is because the processor is getting too hot and throttling back.
 
OP
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Carisio

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
I suggest you not overclock a laptop. It cannot keep the PCU cool enough. The THERMAL note you seeing is because the processor is getting too hot and throttling back.

But, even though I turn it off it does the same thing. Keeps turning red sometimes. TDP Other, PL1 and PL2 and Thermal.
My note is getting 80 to 90ºC. That is the max it should be?

Thank you.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Safe max is something between 95c and 100c. Believe it or not.

What is the make and model of the laptop?
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
The CPU is rated at 15W but can be set up to 25W, depends on the manufacturer and laptop design. Most manufacturers are using these chips in home/business laptops with small coolers and almost always set them at 15W because cooling can't handle more.
I have no idea about what laptop we are talking but overclocking probably won't help. The main problem will be the heat as when you unlock a higher power limit then the CPU will overheat and throttle. If you keep it at 15W then it will hit a power limit and will also throttle. Max TJ is 100°C on these chips. Assuming it's showing ~90°C then it probably already goes up to 100 on single cores and balance the heat/power to drop to ~90. I can be wrong as I can't see how it works but I had something like that on some Dell Vostro, Lenovo Carbon X1 and HP 450G6 with 8250u and 8625u chips.
 
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Carisio

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Safe max is something between 95c and 100c. Believe it or not.

What is the make and model of the laptop?

It is a SAMSUNG x40 - i5 8265u, GeForce MX110 and 8GB Ram

It has never reached 100 ºC

- - - Auto-Merged Double Post - - -

The CPU is rated at 15W but can be set up to 25W, depends on the manufacturer and laptop design. Most manufacturers are using these chips in home/business laptops with small coolers and almost always set them at 15W because cooling can't handle more.
I have no idea about what laptop we are talking but overclocking probably won't help. The main problem will be the heat as when you unlock a higher power limit then the CPU will overheat and throttle. If you keep it at 15W then it will hit a power limit and will also throttle. Max TJ is 100°C on these chips. Assuming it's showing ~90°C then it probably already goes up to 100 on single cores and balance the heat/power to drop to ~90. I can be wrong as I can't see how it works but I had something like that on some Dell Vostro, Lenovo Carbon X1 and HP 450G6 with 8250u and 8625u chips.

It's a Samsung x40

Got it! What do you think about to Undervolt it? Or an external cooler? I've watched the Temps and the Ghz and as soon as it goes to 91, 90ºC with 3,5ghz the system kicks it back. Without any overclock.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Can you undervolt it? Maybe it will help but at least on my laptops, I couldn't do that.
Better cooling will for sure help but if it's worth it? I mean the CPU is good enough for the MX110. The bottleneck, in this case, seems to be the GPU, not CPU ... assuming that problems are related to the specification and not something else.

The GPU is probably using the same heatsink or a heat pipe as the CPU. I don't know if it's worth it but you can remove the bottom cover of the laptop and put something under it, on the corners, so there will be better airflow. It will be hard to make it run like that for longer without the risk of damaging anything but you can at least check if it's going to drop the temps and how everything will act under load.
 

unclewebb

The Real Temp Programmer
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Your ThrottleStop screenshot shows PROCHOT 90°C. That means that Samsung decided to ignore the Intel specified 100°C thermal throttling temperature and instead, has set your laptop to start thermal throttling at a very conservative 90°C. That will reduce maximum performance. The check mark in the PROCHOT box confirms that your CPU has been thermal throttling at temperatures well under the 100°C Intel specification. For consistent performance, it would be best to keep your CPU under 90°C to avoid thermal throttling from kicking in and killing performance.

Your computer does not appear to be using Clock Modulation throttling so there is no reason to check that option in ThrottleStop.

Your computer is using Speed Shift Technology. When ThrottleStop shows SST in green, the Set Multiplier feature does not work. Do not check or adjust the Set Multiplier option. You can adjust the Speed Shift EPP value. Setting EPP to 0 is for maximum performance and a setting of 80 is a good compromise when running on battery power. An EPP setting of 128 or greater will start to reduce maximum performance.

The 8265U is a locked processor. That means you cannot overclock it. The maximum CPU speed is locked by Intel. You might be able to adjust the power limits a little but your CPU is already thermal throttling so at the moment, you have no headroom for that.

Under volting is a good idea but some manufacturers have already started disabling this feature because of another Intel security vulnerability.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/security-center/advisory/intel-sa-00289.html

To test if under volting is still working on your computer, open the FIVR window and set the CPU core and CPU cache to an offset undervolt of -100 mV. Press Apply and have a look in the monitoring table at the top right corner of the FIVR window. This table shows the current settings for your CPU. Does it show a value in the Offset voltage column or does it show a column of +0.0000

If under volting is working, do lots of testing to make sure your CPU is 100% stable. Not all 8th Gen U CPUs are going to be stable at -100 mV. It is usually a good place to start testing.

The 8th Gen U series CPUs can run fully loaded indefinitely at way beyond their 15 Watt TDP limit as long as a manufacturer leaves the turbo power limits unlocked and provides adequate cooling.


The 10th Gen U series shows similar potential.

 
OP
C

Carisio

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Can you undervolt it? Maybe it will help but at least on my laptops, I couldn't do that.
Better cooling will for sure help but if it's worth it? I mean the CPU is good enough for the MX110. The bottleneck, in this case, seems to be the GPU, not CPU ... assuming that problems are related to the specification and not something else.

The GPU is probably using the same heatsink or a heat pipe as the CPU. I don't know if it's worth it but you can remove the bottom cover of the laptop and put something under it, on the corners, so there will be better airflow. It will be hard to make it run like that for longer without the risk of damaging anything but you can at least check if it's going to drop the temps and how everything will act under load.

Thank you. Yah, I can undervolt it. I won't do anything for now in the note structure, I've just bought it, wanna to try doing it in other ways. But really thank you! =)

- - - Auto-Merged Double Post - - -

Your ThrottleStop screenshot shows PROCHOT 90°C. That means that Samsung decided to ignore the Intel specified 100°C thermal throttling temperature and instead, has set your laptop to start thermal throttling at a very conservative 90°C. That will reduce maximum performance. The check mark in the PROCHOT box confirms that your CPU has been thermal throttling at temperatures well under the 100°C Intel specification. For consistent performance, it would be best to keep your CPU under 90°C to avoid thermal throttling from kicking in and killing performance.

Your computer does not appear to be using Clock Modulation throttling so there is no reason to check that option in ThrottleStop.

Your computer is using Speed Shift Technology. When ThrottleStop shows SST in green, the Set Multiplier feature does not work. Do not check or adjust the Set Multiplier option. You can adjust the Speed Shift EPP value. Setting EPP to 0 is for maximum performance and a setting of 80 is a good compromise when running on battery power. An EPP setting of 128 or greater will start to reduce maximum performance.

The 8265U is a locked processor. That means you cannot overclock it. The maximum CPU speed is locked by Intel. You might be able to adjust the power limits a little but your CPU is already thermal throttling so at the moment, you have no headroom for that.

Under volting is a good idea but some manufacturers have already started disabling this feature because of another Intel security vulnerability.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/security-center/advisory/intel-sa-00289.html

To test if under volting is still working on your computer, open the FIVR window and set the CPU core and CPU cache to an offset undervolt of -100 mV. Press Apply and have a look in the monitoring table at the top right corner of the FIVR window. This table shows the current settings for your CPU. Does it show a value in the Offset voltage column or does it show a column of +0.0000

If under volting is working, do lots of testing to make sure your CPU is 100% stable. Not all 8th Gen U CPUs are going to be stable at -100 mV. It is usually a good place to start testing.

The 8th Gen U series CPUs can run fully loaded indefinitely at way beyond their 15 Watt TDP limit as long as a manufacturer leaves the turbo power limits unlocked and provides adequate cooling.


The 10th Gen U series shows similar potential.


unclewebb, I'm so grateful for your help, I don't understand so much and I was seeking for information in the youtube and many sites. They had not such a good information, so I was trying doing it gathering the info from all of them (and doing it safely to not blow up my cpu)

That helped a lot understading my CPU.

Speed Shift -EPP it seems locked in 128. I couldn't change it at all. Here there's a box which I can enable the Speed Shift(...), but I don't now if it is the right way or even if I can change the SS-EPP.
sshift.png

Undervolting is unlocked, I can do it, and it helped a lot, but my pc is not stable. After 10min playing some game it goes bluescreen and reboot the pc. I'm using -100mV as you said. Should I try another values? Is it worth?


About PROCHOT, when I uncheck it, few moments after it automatically checks it again. I guess I'm not allowed to turn it off.


Once again, really thank you =)
 

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unclewebb

The Real Temp Programmer
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
To change the Speed Shift EPP value, just click on where it says 128 and you can change it to whatever you want. This is the Speed Shift EPP request value. To see what EPP value the CPU is actually using, look at the last line in the monitoring table in the top right corner of the FIVR window. Your screenshot above shows that the CPU is using a Speed Shift EPP value of 0. Either you figured out how to change this or Windows is in control of the EPP setting. If you want ThrottleStop to be in control of EPP, use the Windows High Performance power profile. There is only one register in the CPU so it is best not to have two different programs writing different EPP values to this register. If you want Windows to be in control of EPP, do not check the Speed Shift EPP box on the main screen of ThrottleStop. Use the FIVR monitoring data to check to see what value the CPU is using while playing with these different settings.

You mention that under volting helped a lot and then you ask me if it is worth it? If less voltage is helping you then yes, it is worth it. You just need to find the right amount of voltage. I mentioned that -100 mV is a good place to start testing. This is not stable so you need to give your CPU some more voltage. Maybe -90 mV or -80 mV for core and cache will be stable. Less voltage equals less power consumption and less heat so this is a good setting to play with on an overheating laptop.

The PROCHOT box in ThrottleStop is just an indicator. You will see a check mark in this box anytime that your CPU reaches the thermal throttling temperature, even if it only hits that temperature for a millisecond. This way you can play a game, go back and have a look at ThrottleStop after or during a game and you can immediately see if your CPU was thermal throttling. If this box is checked, you can click on this box to clear this throttling information that is stored in the CPU. That is the only point of the PROCHOT box. It does not allow you to disable thermal throttling and there is no way to change the thermal throttling temperature after you have booted up into Windows. Your computer set a thermal throttling offset of -10°C in the BIOS. This forces your CPU to throttle at 90°C (100°C - 10°C). Without a modified BIOS, there is no way around this.

The "Enable Speed Shift when ThrottleStop starts" option is useful on older computers. Most newer laptops automatically enable Speed Shift in the BIOS. If ThrottleStop shows SST in green, Speed Shift is enabled. It will not hurt anything if you check this box but for your laptop, it is probably not necessary.

After you have tested and found a voltage that is 100% stable, you can use the ThrottleStop FIVR option, OK - Save voltages immediately. The Do not save voltages option is good when just testing things out. This way if you get a BSOD, when you restart your computer, ThrottleStop will not use an unstable voltage. Your previous voltage settings will not have been saved.

Everything looks OK. Go play a game with the ThrottleStop Log File option checked. This way you will have a thorough record of how your CPU is performing while in game.
 
OP
C

Carisio

New Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
To change the Speed Shift EPP value, just click on where it says 128 and you can change it to whatever you want. This is the Speed Shift EPP request value. To see what EPP value the CPU is actually using, look at the last line in the monitoring table in the top right corner of the FIVR window. Your screenshot above shows that the CPU is using a Speed Shift EPP value of 0. Either you figured out how to change this or Windows is in control of the EPP setting. If you want ThrottleStop to be in control of EPP, use the Windows High Performance power profile. There is only one register in the CPU so it is best not to have two different programs writing different EPP values to this register. If you want Windows to be in control of EPP, do not check the Speed Shift EPP box on the main screen of ThrottleStop. Use the FIVR monitoring data to check to see what value the CPU is using while playing with these different settings.

You mention that under volting helped a lot and then you ask me if it is worth it? If less voltage is helping you then yes, it is worth it. You just need to find the right amount of voltage. I mentioned that -100 mV is a good place to start testing. This is not stable so you need to give your CPU some more voltage. Maybe -90 mV or -80 mV for core and cache will be stable. Less voltage equals less power consumption and less heat so this is a good setting to play with on an overheating laptop.

The PROCHOT box in ThrottleStop is just an indicator. You will see a check mark in this box anytime that your CPU reaches the thermal throttling temperature, even if it only hits that temperature for a millisecond. This way you can play a game, go back and have a look at ThrottleStop after or during a game and you can immediately see if your CPU was thermal throttling. If this box is checked, you can click on this box to clear this throttling information that is stored in the CPU. That is the only point of the PROCHOT box. It does not allow you to disable thermal throttling and there is no way to change the thermal throttling temperature after you have booted up into Windows. Your computer set a thermal throttling offset of -10°C in the BIOS. This forces your CPU to throttle at 90°C (100°C - 10°C). Without a modified BIOS, there is no way around this.

The "Enable Speed Shift when ThrottleStop starts" option is useful on older computers. Most newer laptops automatically enable Speed Shift in the BIOS. If ThrottleStop shows SST in green, Speed Shift is enabled. It will not hurt anything if you check this box but for your laptop, it is probably not necessary.

After you have tested and found a voltage that is 100% stable, you can use the ThrottleStop FIVR option, OK - Save voltages immediately. The Do not save voltages option is good when just testing things out. This way if you get a BSOD, when you restart your computer, ThrottleStop will not use an unstable voltage. Your previous voltage settings will not have been saved.

Everything looks OK. Go play a game with the ThrottleStop Log File option checked. This way you will have a thorough record of how your CPU is performing while in game.


Hey man! How you doing?

I'll let the Windows control the EPP, It is working on 0 in the Enery Power I've configured by myself.
About PROCHOT, I got it, thank you! I asked if it was worth cuz I didn't know if it would effect my pc or not, once you said me to undervolt -100mV as a good parameter to start, I thought lower values would not make any difference. But that is ok.
I am using -90mV and it looks pretty stable. I've playing and using some 3d softwares and everything looks good. Guess I'll save this settings. My CPU is doing much better.

Really thank you. Helped a lot! :)