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Pinpoint exact cause of crash when overclocking?

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STaRDoGG

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
Chicago-ish
Hey all,

So, I just got a a new mobo, RAM, and CPU, and now I'm OC'ing it all. I've only spent moderate amounts of time in the past OC'ing, and it's few and far between, so, I usually forget all that I learned, and need to re-learn when I'm doing it again... :p So, essentially, I'm a n00b at it.

I installed a ASRock Fatal1ty X370 Gaming X and AMD Ryzen 5 1600, and using either MSI Afterburner, or Precision XOC for the OC'ing; I'm wondering if there's a way to get the exact reason for a crash while playing with the various sliders. i.e. not enough voltage? Exactly how much more voltage was needed? 10mhz too high of a frequency? etc.

I know there's always an element of just trial and error, and making micro-adjustments until you get it all just right, but if there were something that stated exactly the reason "I went a bit too far" with something, that caused the reboot, it'd help speed things up a bit. ;)

I'm hoping for a bit better info than just "if you just slid a slider up and it crashed, then you know what caused it", because maybe I slid the frequency up, and it crashed because it needed more voltage (or something).

TIA
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Gotta play with it...sorry.

Generally, raising core clocks requires more core voltage. With new cards, raise power limit and push on it. If it crashes, lower it. You know you 'went a bit too far' when it crashes or freezes.

Its weird, you mention cpu and mobo, then talk about gpu overclocking tools... which are you asking for help with, really? Never mentioned a gpu either. :)
 

||Console||

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2004
Easy way to pin point what went wrong . Change one thing @ a time and then test =)
Yes it takes some time .
I do it in reverse from most ppl . I start with the max voltage suggested and then raise multi till I cant boot windows .
Then I start working from there to skip a bunch of testing in the middle .
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Can you give us more details about the hardware? Memory? PSU? Video Card? Cooler?
 
OP
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STaRDoGG

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
Chicago-ish
Its weird, you mention cpu and mobo, then talk about gpu overclocking tools... which are you asking for help with, really? Never mentioned a gpu either. :)

haha, you're right, those 2 apps came to mind first because that's the last thing I was messing w/OC'ing as well... I have a EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW 8GB. :p

I was actually asking for the CPU in the OP though, lol. For testing the CPU OC'ing, I'm using F-Stream to play with adjustments, then making them perm in the BIOS as they pass tests.

- - - Updated - - -

Can you give us more details about the hardware? Memory? PSU? Video Card? Cooler?

Lesse:

Memory:
G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600)

PSU:
Thermaltake Black Widow 850W

GPU:
EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW 8GB

Cooler:
The Wraith Spire (fan + heatsink) that came with the Ryzen CPU
 
Last edited:

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Are you trying to run the Ripjaws V series RAM at the full 3200 mhz? It's not one of the memory products that people are generally having success with at 3200 mhz on the Ryzen CPUs. The Flare X and Trident Z series will operate more reliably at 3200 mhz. They use a different chip than the V series does.
 
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STaRDoGG

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
Chicago-ish
Are you trying to run the Ripjaws V series RAM at the full 3200 mhz? It's not one of the memory products that people are generally having success with at 3200 mhz on the Ryzen CPUs. The Flare X and Trident Z series will operate more reliably at 3200 mhz. They use a different chip than the V series does.

:-/ Unfortunately, I discovered that as well, while trying to run the new ram with the regular XMP profile. Wish I would've known that before I bought it, now I'm kinda stuck with it for the time being. So far the highest I've been able to stably get it going is @ 2933.

Man, you guys are good, lol. Looks like I found the right forum for this. :clap:

btw, is it your opinion that the reason for that is due to hardware limitations that won't be fixable? Or software limitations, that a future firmware will be able to fix?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Bios updates have helped to a point with high speed memory compatibility issues on the Ryzen platform. But it is also a hardware issue that will probably never go away altogether. Here's hoping that Ryzen 2 will have successfully addressed this when it is introduced. But that may be a couple of years from now.

Honestly though, the real world difference in performance between 2933 and 3200 is miniscule. And before the improvements made by bios updates you likely wouldn't have got it to 2933.
 
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STaRDoGG

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
Chicago-ish
Honestly though, the real world difference in performance between 2933 and 3200 is miniscule. And before the improvements made by bios updates you likely wouldn't have got it to 2933.

That's my understanding too so far, from other posts I've read; that it's hardly noticeable. I'm a little OCD though in that sense :p, and just knowing that it's "supposed" to go that high and isn't, drives me a lil bit kooky. lmao.

I have another couple of quick questions regarding voltage(s);

Here's the list of sliders available:

joI0le6.png

What's the diff between "CPU Voltage" and Vcore Voltage (Offset)? Do I need to mess with both of them to milk performance, or just one of them?

Also, I know what DRAM Voltage is for, but what about all those other voltage sliders? Is there any reason to try tweaking any of those too?

Last one, :p have you heard/read of the highest, safe voltage I should use for my CPU/mobo?

TIA :cheers:
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
An offset is only applied on load and is added to tbe vcore value. So for example if you needed 1.4v to be stable at 4 ghz and use the offset it would be 1.35 with .05 offset.
 
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STaRDoGG

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
Chicago-ish
An offset is only applied on load and is added to tbe vcore value. So for example if you needed 1.4v to be stable at 4 ghz and use the offset it would be 1.35 with .05 offset.

Ahh, interesting ....

Sounds like it's better to use an offset then? Lower the constant voltage, and raise the offset, to keep the voltage down unless under heavy load?

What's the best way to do that? First test what's needed with the regular, constant voltage, then when it's stable, lower the constant voltage, and add the offset?
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Its user preference. I just set it manually in the bios and let windows handle the clocks and voltages through power setting.