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Possible Spiral WB mold?

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NeoMoses

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2001
I was looking at the paper this morning and ran across a picture of an air conditioner compressor and it looks exactly like a spiral waterblock.
compressor.jpg


I know some members of these forums have been working on small furnaces to melt aluminum and possibly copper, and this looks like a great mold to make spiral blocks. All it would take is some green sand, mold boxes, and molten metal!

Does anyone have an old A/C compressor that is broken? if so, could you see if it has this type of pump in it? This could be pretty cool, a DIY spiral block.
 

JFettig

Hey! I showered! Senior
Joined
Jan 5, 2002
Location
MN
sweet!! that looks REALLY GOOD!
whats it made out of? oh you dont actually have it... im sure you could find it at some a/c place maby?
 

grim

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Location
boston, ma
good idea. looks like a good mold except a little too big. maybe smaller a/c units have smaller spirals.
 

SemiCycle

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
Hampton Roads. VA
Very nice. I've heard many conversations of the cost of getting a water block milled, but I've never heard the price of getting one cast. Any Ideas on how much that would cost?
 

Illah

Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2002
Location
San Francisco
Thing is, if you dumped molten copper in there you'd have really thin channels with some fat *** 'ribs' in them. You'd need the mold of the mold, if you know what I mean.

--Illah
 

ziah

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2002
Location
northeast usa
i think re melted metal would not be as good. bubbles etc. i had done some bronze stuff in school and its hard as crap to get a good pour. and a bit of integrity is lost each time its melted. and thats when alloys start to come in.

allthough im no expert.

~z
 
OP
N

NeoMoses

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2001
Illah said:
Thing is, if you dumped molten copper in there you'd have really thin channels with some fat *** 'ribs' in them. You'd need the mold of the mold, if you know what I mean.

--Illah

I was planning on using the lost mold process. My idea was to heat up the steel spiral compressor and press it into a piece of styrofoam. Then, pack the foam in green sand and pour away. I think it's worth a shot, and even if it didn't work that well, it would be fun.
 

TheGhengisKhan

BANNED TROLL -Per Silversinksam
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Location
Newport News, Virginia
uhh, wouldn't styrofoam light on fire from the temperature that copper melts at? you'd need a mold made from something with a much higher melting point. Like steel, or iron, or something like that. in the end it would be much more expensive. you'd have to get the steel mold machined, then a kiln hot enough to melt copper, then you could make several blocks from the one mold, you'd have to make/sell at least 100 or more blocks to even get your money's worth out of it.
 

Diggrr

Underwater Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
NeoMoses said:
I was planning on using the lost mold process. My idea was to heat up the steel spiral compressor and press it into a piece of styrofoam. Then, pack the foam in green sand and pour away. I think it's worth a shot, and even if it didn't work that well, it would be fun.

That would give you the opposite of what's in the pic above.
You want it like in the picture, with narrow side walls and wide open water channels. If you impressed the foam with the heated spiral, you'd get the same result that Illah said, with 1/2 wide spiral, and 1/8" water channels.

You don't need to find the part in the pic, you just need to duplicate the shape of the finished product out of foam. Maybe just using a hotknife to cut out your channels.
 
OP
N

NeoMoses

Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2001
yep, my bad. I haven't slept lately. The Lost Foam process was an older idea that somehow snuck in this thread.

The real way I was planning on doing this was to simply press the part into a green sand mold and use it as a pattern. I know that sand casting doesnt' give the greatest surface finishes and wouldn't be cost effective. It's just one of the many ideas that ran around in my head. Maybe it'll help spawn some other ideas that eventually become useful.
 

Daemonfly

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
Location
NW Pa
Sand mold would give a rough surface finish which would be BENEFICIAL to a waterblock's internal channels, i.e. turbulance & reduced laminar flow.

I hope someone can find a smaller version of the original pic, as that thing would make a HUGE waterblock, :beer: