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Possible to switch programs to a new system?

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1Time

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The main hard drive has Win XP and various programs, but the mobo "may" be fried. So if I build a new system, how could I make use of the programs from this drive without re-installing them? They are proprietary programs for which there are no installation disks. I assume I'd have to re-install the OS, but how could I make use of these programs?

Would using a different disk for the OS and the current disk for the programs be possible? Thanks
 

Automata

Destroyer of Empires and Use
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May 15, 2006
The program would be missing the [possibly] needed registry keys. In short, you can't move them over. There is absolutely no way to get installs for them again?

If not, you could get a replacement motherboard that is the same model and just continue using the computer without reinstalling the OS.
 
OP
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1Time

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The program would be missing the [possibly] needed registry keys. In short, you can't move them over. There is absolutely no way to get installs for them again?
No way to install again. What about using the programs from the same disk? And then using a new OS installed on a new disk?

------

If not, you could get a replacement motherboard that is the same model and just continue using the computer without reinstalling the OS.
But isn't the current OS "tied" to the current mobo? If not and a new mobo of the same model would be a perfect solution.
 

Automata

Destroyer of Empires and Use
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No way to install again. What about using the programs from the same disk? And then using a new OS installed on a new disk?
Copying isn't the issue, the registry keys are. The only way (if they need the registry keys) is to either run the original hard drive (replace the motherboard) or reinstall the program. Technically, you could move the keys over manually, but without knowing every last key used, you are just going to increase your headache. In example, the product that our company sells, the network client install has over 600 registry keys splattered everywhere. For a standalone install (such as yours), it is probably much more. I would never attempt to move registry keys between computers even for the program that I'm heavily trained in, it isn't worth the time.

But isn't the current OS "tied" to the current mobo? If not and a new mobo of the same model would be a perfect solution.
It doesn't transfer if you want to just switch the motherboard, but it does cover failure. In example, if you buy a Gateway desktop and the motherboard fails, you can legally replace the motherboard. Same applies for all versions of Windows.
 
OP
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1Time

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Really appreciate the help. Sorry for not understanding. Please clarify.

Can the mobo be replaced and the original hard drive with OS and programs used?

Can the mobo be replaced, a new OS placed on a new hard drive, and the programs used from the old hard drive?

How else can this be resolved so these programs can be used?

Dealing with registry keys is something I won't be doing; some pro might if it comes down to that. The programs are proprietary and without installation disks or registration requirements; can't be bought. Money salvaging the programs is not much of an issue. No piece of hardware will be handled through a warranty. The part will just be replaced. Thanks
 
OP
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That just seems too good (easy) to be true, but I'm not adverse to receiving good news. Thanks

The OS is Win XP. Any reason to be concerned about Microsoft having an issue with this mobo replacement? Thanks again.
 

Automata

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That just seems too good (easy) to be true, but I'm not adverse to receiving good news. Thanks

The OS is Win XP. Any reason to be concerned about Microsoft having an issue with this mobo replacement? Thanks again.
Assuming the hard drive and its data is intact, the only "worst case solution" is that you have to re-activate Windows. If that system is a pre-built (Gateway, Dell, etc), you will not need to re-do that as they use pre-activated installs.
 
OP
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1Time

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Assuming the hard drive and its data is intact, the only "worst case solution" is that you have to re-activate Windows. If that system is a pre-built (Gateway, Dell, etc), you will not need to re-do that as they use pre-activated installs.

No, it's not a Dell or whatever. You state that as if re-activating Windows "may" not be necessary. Hopefully not.

The hard drive could have been taken out; I don't know. I wouldn't think so. But the hard drive was previously backed up to an external hard drive by a local PC business (pro). So if the hard drive was rendered inoperative, the idea was that the back up drive could be used to copy to a new replacement hard drive. They used Norton Ghost to back up.
 

Automata

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I would say there is a high chance of it "just working" then. ;)
 

RED Hot Machine

Inactive Moderator
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Aug 5, 2001
I have seen cases of installing a new motherboard in a machine (not the same model) and Windows will still work to a fashion.

What programs are you looking to keep? Are there not freeware alternatives you could use?
 

EarthDog

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It will likely 'work' with a new motherboard with your current install and apps however teh chance are it will be very buggy and not worth it. Its always reccomended to reformat your Windows install when switching motherboards.

Best answer is buy the same mother board and you will have no issues running the same HDD on it.
 
OP
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I would say there is a high chance of it "just working" then. ;)

I have seen cases of installing a new motherboard in a machine (not the same model) and Windows will still work to a fashion.

What programs are you looking to keep? Are there not freeware alternatives you could use?

Thanks.

The next step in trouble shooting this (from the Intel Mobo forum) seems to be to replace the BIOS chip in the current mobo, instead of buying a new mobo, same or different model.

NO chance of using any other programs in place of these.
 
OP
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Best answer is buy the same mother board and you will have no issues running the same HDD on it.

Thanks. That's definitely what I am considering IF I eliminate the possibility of a BIOS chip replacement not working. Getting a quality used mobo of this make/model is easy. But I'm doubtful this mobo can be bought new anywhere - P5N32-E SLI.
 

Neuromancer

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There are applications that monitor all changes a program makes a to a system (registry wise). I believe they are used for uninstalling applications, but can probably be used for reinstalling them as well.
 
OP
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1Time

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There are applications that monitor all changes a program makes a to a system (registry wise). I believe they are used for uninstalling applications, but can probably be used for reinstalling them as well.

I use such a program in another system. Windows XP does the same thing.

However, I'm currently concerned with getting the OS + programs working from the current hard drive with the current mobo. If a BIOS chip replacement does this, then done. If not, I'm looking at a new mobo, which may or may not exist.

Next alternative seems to be to use a new OS on a new hard drive on a new mobo, and stick the current hard drive / OS / programs in the new system as a slave drive (?) to make use of the programs. Right?
 

EarthDog

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Next alternative seems to be to use a new OS on a new hard drive on a new mobo, and stick the current hard drive / OS / programs in the new system as a slave drive (?) to make use of the programs. Right?
This will not work with any programs (most) that have registry entries as they would not be 'installed' technically on the OS.