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PSU buyers guide and How-to guide

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jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
Edited 12-14-11 : Removed old stuff and added the link to our sticky

First off I would just like to say that this is not an original compilation. Much of the information is edited from collection of PSU information here (http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1045259). I just thought that we needed one thread of everything you need to know. Also, I am no guru, so if you have feedback please tell me.
Here it goes…



Recommended PSU's - True/Tested
Updated regularly



PSU calculator

Great place for everything Power Supplies!

How to use a DMM to check voltages
or
http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=137886

Recommended Digital Multimeter (DMM):


The Guide to Power Supply Pin removers (ATX/P4 and Molexes)

To jump-start a PSU attach a wire or paper clip ( or anything that carries a current ) to the green and any black wire. Sometimes PSUs require a load to start, so be aware of this.

How to run fans at different voltages

Sleeving guide

If you own an HP, Gateway, Compaq, Dell or Emachine: This is how to find-out what PS is probably inside.





Basic Questions Answered
________________________________________

Voltages & Amperage: Only the +3.3V, +5V & +12V are used by modern computers. Spec is usually +/- 5%. When the original ATX spec was written the +3.3V & +5V were far more stressed by heavy usage demands than they are in today’s computers. Almost any high quality ATX spec PS of 300Watts or more can supply far more +3.3V & +5V amperage than today’s computers require. Today’s computers, especially the AMD A64’s and the latest Intel P4’s stress the +12V rail the most, requiring far more amperage than was originally called for in the original ATX spec for the +12V rail.

Wattage: Voltage times Amperage equals Wattage. Wattage is the ability to do work; it can be converted into Horse Power. A PS’s wattage rating is the total combined wattage output of all the rails combined. Older ATX designs created most of their wattage in the +3.3 & +5V rails, creating very little on the +12V rail. Newer ATX12V & ATX12 V2.0 designs are creating ever more wattage on the +12V rail, to meet the needs of today’s & tomorrow’s computers.

Dual +12V Rails: Most PS’s today supply all of their +12V amperage through one rail, just like almost every PS manufacturer supplies their +3.3V and +5V through one rail each. However some forward thinking manufacture’s are supplying their +12V amperage through more than one rail, the most common today for PC’s is to use two +12V rails or dual rails. The new ATX12 V2.0 spec. also requires dual (or more) +12V rails.

Why more than one +12V rail? Electrical isolation for noise and improved voltage regulation. Some devices, usually electromechanical ones having motors, produce noise spikes & voltage fluxuations, these can include pumps, compressors, fans, drives, lights (when turned on & off) and probably TEC’s & Peltiers. By putting these “noisy” devices, that often turn on & off, or at least often change their power (amperage) demands, on a separate rail we isolate them from the MoBo, CPU, Video Card(s) and the other electronic components that are sensitive to noise & sudden changes in voltage. This is a good thing! ATX12 V2.0 is the future. Additional Information: http://www.silentpcreview.com/article28-page3.html

Hold Up Time: Measured in milliseconds (ms) is how long the PS will continue to supply in spec voltage & amperage, once the AC input voltage is removed. The longer the hold up time generally the higher the quality of the PS. Hold up time gives the time necessary for an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) to switch to batteries and allow uninterrupted operation of the computer.

Efficiency and Temperature: There are no electronic devices that are 100% efficient & PS’s are no exception. Typically PS’s operate between 60% and 70% efficiency. The more efficient the PS, the less power that is lost as heat and the lower the cooling requirements. Newer PSU's meeting the ATX12V 2.xx specs have efficiency ratings from 70% to as high as 85%. The Antec Phantom's & the Seasonic S-12's are 80%+ efficient.

Reading and Adjusting Voltages: BIOS and software such as Motherboard Monitor 5 (MM5) can not be fully trusted to give accurate voltage readings and since many of today's better PS's allow the user to easily adjust their voltages, it is very important that a voltmeter/multimeter be used to measure these voltages correctly.

EPS: Among other things, it means it has the 8-pin 12V plug for the motherboard. The 8-pin is meant for dual CPU setups. Many EPS12V-ready PSU's like the OCZ Powerstream come with two 12v 4-pin headers that can be combined into the 8-pin.

PFC: Power Factor Correction: This has always been important for large scale commerical applications,
now it is something that the home & small office user can also consider,
especially if you are going to be operating outside of north america.
Here is a good explination of PFC: http://www.rojakpot.com/default.aspx?location=3&var1=81&var2=0
APC on PFC: ftp://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/SADE-5TNQYL_R0_EN.pdf

APC UPS : American Power Conversion (APC) http://www.apcc.com makers of IMO the world’s finest Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS), check them out, I promise that you will be glad you did.
I recommend this one as it also protects your network connections.
Back-UPS ES 725 Broadband: http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BE725BB
Available at new egg for $81: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?Submit=Suggested&Description=42-101




PSU's to Avoid for High Performance or OC'ed Systems:
______________________________________________
Some of these PSU's are dangerous to your system, some are just sub-standard,
however NONE can be recommended, for high performance or over-clocked systems.

Achieve
Aerocool
Allied
Apex
Arrow,
Aspire > Dangerous! They don't even pretend to meet the ATX/AMD/Intel specs!
Austin
Codegen
Coolmax
Demon
Deer
Duro
Dynapower
Eagle
EagleTech
Foxlink
Hercules
InWin (except FSP models)
Jpac
JustPC
Key Mouse
Kingwin
- Lowend models - If it's over $50 though, it's probably OK to use
L&C
Logic
Linkworld
Macron Power
MGE
Mustang
Okia
Power-Man (except FSP models)
Powmax
Power-Up
Powerstar
QMax
Qtec
q-tec
Raidmax (except Topower/Tagan models, not sold with cases)
Real PC Power
Rhycon
Robanton
Rosewill - Lowend models - If it's over $50 though, it's probably OK to use
Skyhawk
Soly Tech
TMP-ANS
Tsunami
Turbo
Turbolink
US-Can
Viomax


_____________________________________

Few companies actually make their own PSUs. In most cases, they are made by another company (the OEM), and sold under a different brand name. This guide is intended to provide information as to who is the actual manufacturer of PSUs sold by various companies. In many cases, knowing the OEM will give you a better idea as to the actual quality of the unit.

The UL (Exxxxxx) number for these units is also provided.

This list is obviously far from complete (and never will be complete). Any additions/corrections are most welcome. Please don't copy/paste an entire list from an Internet site/forum, though - I've seen quite a few of these and most are horrendously inaccurate/outdated. If possible, please provide a link to the source as well.


Aerocool
Known Manufacturers - Andyson
Specific Units

All units - Andyson E239028

Andyson
Known Manufacturers - Andyson
Specific Units

All units - Andyson E239028

Antec
Known Manufacturers - Channelwell, Enhance, FSP, Seasonic
Specific Units:

SmartPower series - Channelwell E176105
TruePower II series - Channelwell E176105
Phantom series - Channelwell E176105
NeoHE series - Seasonic E104405
TruePower Trio series - Seasonic E104405
Earthwatts series - Seasonic E104405
Solution (SU) series - Seasonic E104405
Basiq series - FSP
Quattro series - Enhance E166947

*E176105 is actually Antec's own UL number - some units appear to be registered under this number, others under the number of the OEM.

Akasa
Known Manufacturers - Enhance
Specific Units:

All units - Enhance E166947

Allied
Known Manufacturers - L&C
Specific Units:

All Units - L&C E214301

Apevia/Aspire

Known Manufacturers - Youngyear, Wintech, Real Power Pro
Specific Units

AS Prefix - Youngyear E126556
Iceberg series (IB Prefix) - Youngyear E126556
PFC Prefix - Youngyear E126556
MR Prefix - Youngyear E126556
WIN Prefix - Wintech
CW Prefix (Turbolink on label) - Real Power Enterprise

Apex
Known Manufacturers - L&C
Specific Units

AL Prefix - L&C E214301
SL Prefix - Soltech E223918

*Solytech are a division of Deer

Asus
Known Manufacuters - Acbel Polytech
Specific Units

All units - Acbel Polytech


Athena Power
Known Manufacturers - Sun Pro
Specific Units

AP-MP4ATX25 - Sun Pro E210743
AP-MPS3ATX30 Sun Pro E210743
AP-P4ATX42F Sun Pro E210743
AP-MPS3ATX40 Sun Pro E210743
AP-MP4ATX40 Sun Pro E210743
AP-P4ATX50F12 Topower E130843

BFG
Known Manufacturers - Topower
Specific Units

All units - Topower UL Not stated

Coolermaster
Known Manufacturers - Acbel Polytec, Enhance, Hipro, Seventeam
Specific Units:

Real Power 550W - Acbel Polytec E131875
eXtremePower 430W - Hipro E143709
eXtremePower 600W - Seventeam UL Not stated
eXtremePower 650W - Seventeam UL Not stated
Real Power Pro 750W - Acbel Polytec
Real Power Pro 850/1000W - Enhance

Coolmax
Known Manufacturers - ATNG, Sirtech

Corsair
Known Manufacturers - Seasonic, Channelwell
Specific Units

HX Series - Seasonic UL Not Stated
VX450W - Seasonic UL Not Stated
VX550W - Channelwell UL Not Stated

Delta
Known Manufacturers - Delta
Specific Units

All units - Delta E131881/E217431/E313881


Diablotek
Known Manufacturers - Leadman
Specific Units

All units - Leadman UL Not Stated

Enermax
Known Manufacturers - Enermax
Specific Units

All units - Enermax E134014

Enhance
Known Manufacturers - Enhance
Specific Units

All units - Enhance E166947

ePower
Known Manufacturers - Topower
Specific Units

All Units - Topower E130843

*ePower are Topower's retail brand

Etasis
Known Manufacturers - Etasis
Specific Units

All units - Etasis E176239

FSP
Known Manufacturers - FSP
Specific Units

All units - FSP E190414

Gigabyte
Known Manufacturers - Channelwell
Specific Units

All units - Channelwell E161451

Hiper
Known Manufacturers - Andyson
Specific Units

All units - Andyson E239028

Hipro
Known Manufacturers - Hipro, Topower
Specific Units

Units with HP Prefix - Hipro E143709
Units with TOP Prefix - Topower

In Win
Known Manufacturers - In Win, FSP
Specific Units

Models with FSP prefix - FSP
Models with IW/IP prefix - In Win E193791

Kingwin
Known Manufacturers - Super Flower
Specific Units

All units - Super Flower E197467

Koolance
Known Manufacturers - Channelwell
Specific Units

Liquid Cooled 1200W - Channelwell UL Not stated

Leadman
Known Manufacturers - Leadman
Specific Units

All units - Leadman UL Not stated

Linkworld
Known Manufacturers - Linkworld
Specific Units

All units - Linkworld E131039

Logisys
Known Manufacturers - Youngyear

Masscool
Known Manufacturers - Seventeam
Specific Units

All Units - Seventeam E141400

Mushkin
Known Manufacturers - Topower
Specific Units

All Units - Topower E130643

*Topower's actual UL is E130843. This seems to be a Typo on Muskin (and a few others') part.

MSI
Known Manufacturers - Solytech
Specific Units

All units - Solytech E223918

*Solytech are a division of Deer

OCZ
Known Manufacturers - 3Y, FSP, Topower
Specific Units

Powerstream series - Topower
GameXStream series - FSP E190414
EvoStream series - 3Y E190414
ProXStream series - 3Y E190414
StealthXStream series - FSP E190414
ModXStream - FSP E190414

*FSP have a controlling interest in 3Y

Powmax
Known Manufacturers - Leadman
Specific Units

All Units Leadman UL Not Stated

PC Power and Cooling
Known Manufacturers - Seasonic, WinTact
Specific Units

Silencer series - Seasonic
Turbo-Cool series - WinTact UL Not Stated

*PC Power and Cooling are now owned by OCZ, although the product lines remain separate

Raidmax
Known Manufacturers - Sun Pro, Topower
Specific Units

RX-380K Sun Pro E210734
RX-420K Sun Pro E210734
RX-500S Andyson E239028
RX-630A Topower

Rosewill
Known Manufacturers - ATNG, Deer, Leadman, Solytech, Wintech, Youngyear
Specific Units

RV200 - Deer E203196
RV300 - Leadman UL Not Stated
RV350 - ATNG E186010
RV350-2 - Deer E203196
RV450 - ATNG E186010
RD series - Solytech E223918
RE series - Youngyear E126556
RP series - ATNG E186010
RT series - Wintech UL Not Stated
RX series - ATNG E186010

Scythe
Known Manufacturers - Topower
Specific Units

All units - Topower E130843

Seasonic
Known Manufacturers - Seasonic
Specific Units

All units - Seasonic E104405

Silverstone
Known Manufacturers - Enhance, Etasis, FSP, Seventeam
Specific Units:

Olympia OP1000 - Seventeam E141400
Decathlon DA1000 - Seventeam E141400
All other Olympia units - Impervio
All other Decathlon units - Impervio
Element series (EF suffix) - Enhance E166947
Strider series (F suffix) above 500W - Enhance E166947
Strider series (F suffix) below 500W - FSP
Zeus ST56ZF - Enhance E166947
All other Zeus models - Etasis E176239
Nightjar series - Etasis E176239


Sparkle
Known Manufacturers - FSP
Specific Units

All units - FSP

*Sparkle is owned by FSP

StarTech
Known Manufacturers - ATNG
Specific Units

All Units - ATNG E186010

Super Flower
Known Manufacturers - Super Flower
Specific Units

All units - Super Flower E242429

Tagan
Known Manufacturers - Enhance, Topower
Specific Units

Silver Power - Enhance
All Other Units - Topower E223995

Thermaltake
Known Manufacturers - Channelwell, HEC, Sirtec
Specific Units

Purepower series - Channelwell E161451
TR2 430W - HEC E199442
All Other TR2s - Channelwell E161451/E193705
Toughpower series - Channelwell UL Not stated

Ultra
Known Manufacturers - Andyson, Seventeam, Wintech
Specific Units

V-Series - Wintech E178768
XVS - Wintech E178768
X-Finity 600W - Wintech E178768
X2 - Wintech E178768
X3 - Andyson E239028
X-Pro 600W EE - Andyson E239028
X-Pro 750W - Seventeam E141400
X-Pro 800W - Andyson E239028
X-Finity 800W - Andyson E239028

XClio
Known Manufacturers - Channelwell, Enhance
Specific Units:

Stablepower series - Enhance UL Not stated
Greatpower series - Channelwell UL Not stated
Goodpower series - Channelwell UL Not stated
BL series - Channelwell UL Not stated

Xion
Known Manufacturers - Super Flower

Zalman
Known Manufacturers - FSP
Specific units:

All units - FSP E198072

Zippy
Known Manufacturers - Zippy
Specific Units:


_________________________


From our own guru.....
Oklahoma Wolf said:
In no particular order, these are the ones I know well enough to recommend based primarily on reliability.

Top of the heap industrial grade:
Zippy/Emacs
Etasis (Silverstone 560w)
Win-Tact (high watt PC P&C)

Excellent:
Fortron-Source (also sold under Sparkle/SPI, Powertech, BFG, some PC P&C models, and Aopen among others)
Seasonic (Antec Neo HE, PC P&C Silencers)

Above Average:
Enhance (most Silverstone and Akasa units)
Channel Well (Antec, Meridian XClio, some Thermaltakes)
Topower (OCZ, Globalwin, BeQuiet, Athena Power, A+GBP, Tagan, some Vantec)
AcBel Polytech (Coolermaster)
Andyson Electronics (some Hiper models, AC Ryan)
Heroichi (HEC, Compucase, a few Thermaltakes)

Average:
Enermax
Superflower/TTGI/Fore Point/Fortrex
Wintech (Sintek, Ultras that aren't the first gen X-Connect)
Sirtec (most Thermaltakes)

That's all I can think of for now - hope that helps some.

_________________________

Pulled from Jonnyguru forums.....

jonnyguru said:
PSU Recommendations for High End Gaming PC's

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommendations are made on a model by model or product line by product line basis since many companies make such a wide range of product, it is dificult to say things like "Seasonic makes excellent PSU's" or "Coolmax sucks."


Tier 1:

PC Power and Cooling Turbo-Cool product line
Built like a server PSU, but with the home user also in mind.
Louder than most, but not as loud as other "server grade" PSU's like SuperMicro or Zippy.
1kW is 8800GTX SLI certified
1kW is Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
850W is 7800 and 7900GTX SLI certified
5 year warranty

Etasis Gaming Power product line
Server grade
Fairly quiet for PSU's with 80MM fans
ET-750 and ET-850 are both 8800GTX SLI certified
3 year warranty

Silverstone Zeus and Nightjar product line
Based on Etasis units, a company known for server grade PSU's
Not very loud, even when outfitted with 80MM fans.
Often sleeved cables, etc. Geared more towards the enthusiast than other server grade PSU's.
ST85ZF is Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
ST75ZF is 8800GTX SLI certified
ST56ZF is 7800 and 7900GTX SLI certified
3 year warranty

Silverstone Olympia product line
Uses SevenTeam 1kW server platform
Very stable power
80A continuous power on a single 12V rail
Single, rear mounted 80MM fan is loud
8800GTX SLI certified
3 year warranty

Zippy GSM and PSL product line
Typically server power supplies and can be loud
PSL model has 40MM fan which has a high pitched sound when running
There is a "gaming" product line that offers all of the necessary connectors for almost any high end gaming rig, a nicer finish and has a much quieter fan than the server models.
Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
PSL-6850P(G1) is 8800GTX SLI certified
3 year warranty


Tier 2:

Enermax Galaxy product line
Lots of power
Semi-Modular
Very quiet
Very efficient
Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
3 years

Enermax Liberty 620W
Excellent voltage regulation
Modular
Very quiet
Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
Only 1 year warranty

Seasonic S12 and M12 product lines
Very good voltage regulation
Very efficient
Very quiet
M12 series is modular
Crossfire X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
S12 650W is 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
3 year warranty

Corsair product line
Based on same platform and component quality as Seasonic S/M12
Very efficient
Very quiet
Modular
HX620W is 7800 and 7900GTX SLI certified
5 year warranty

PC Power and Cooling Silencer product line
Based on same platform and component quality as Seasonic S/M12
750W is 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
3 year warranty

Coolmax Greenpower product line
Based on ATNG server platform
A little on the loud side
X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
3 year warranty
SevenTeam SSI EPS 12V 2.91 Series and "Fanless" product lines
Strong regulation
Efficient and quiet, despite being based on a server platform
Good price, but rarely available in the U.S.
2 year warranty

MGE/XG Duro and Magnum
Based on SevenTeam's higher end units
Lifetime Warranty
Enhance products
Efficient and quiet
Very affordable
Often does not come with sleeved cables
Only 1 year warranty

Silverstone Element and Strider product lines
Based on Enhance's higher end products
3 year warranty on PSU's > 500W. All others are only 1 year warranty

Xclio Stablepower product line
Based on Enhance's ENP 850W and 1000W products
Cooled by quieter 140MM fan (as opposed to pair of 80's)
2 year warranty

Andyson's server line (recognized by dual 80MM fans) and high-efficiency line (recognized by single 130MM fan.)
Extremely affordable
Solid performance and quality components
High efficiency models are 84% typical and very quiet
Not commonly found in U.S. or E.U. Andyson doesn't even have a website
Warranty unknown

Hiper Type-M 670 and 730W and Type-R 730W
Based on server grade Andyson units
3 year warranty
Ultra X-Finity and X-Pro 800W
Based on server grade Andyson units
3 year warranty/Lifetime with product registration

Ultra X-Pro/X-Finity/X3 600W and 700W ("EE" for "Energy Efficient") APFC (not non-APFC)
Based on high-efficiency Andyson units
Quiet and efficient
3 year warranty/Lifetime with product registration


Tier 3:


Antec Trio/NeoHE product line
Built by Seasonic, but not the same build quality as above Seasonics
NeoHE is modular
Trio 650W is 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
NeoHE 550W is X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified
700W is 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
5 year warranty

FSP Epsilon product line
Compact size
Fairly efficient and quiet
Notable ripple issue
Inexpensive
X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified

OCZ GameXstrem product line
Based on FSP Epsilon mentioned above
3 year warranty

AOpen AO700-ALN
Based on FSP Epsilon mentioned above
Only 1 year warranty

Thermaltake Toughpower product line
Built by CWT, but without all of the Fuhjyyu capacitors
550W is X1800/X850/X800 Crossfire certified
600W, 700W and 750W are X1900/X1950 Crossfire certified and 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
750W is modular
5 year warranty

Xclio GreatPower product line
Supposedly same construction as Toughpower (??? need confirmation)
650W, 700W and 750W is 7950 GX2 Quad SLI certified
2 year warranty


More to be added later.....
 

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Last edited:

redrumy3

Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2006
Location
New York
Very Nice will be helpful to alot of ppl. including myself :)


For Dual Video Card (SLI) Systems:

Crossfire as well :)
 

amazon10x

Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2003
Location
College Park, MD
Very nice. Should be stickied. I do have some suggestions...

Use color coding and columns to make quick browsing of prices et cetera easier.

It would also be nice if you added a budget section.
 
OP
jiggamanjb

jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
Very Nice will be helpful to alot of ppl. including myself :)

For Dual Video Card (SLI) Systems:

Crossfire as well :)

done

Very nice. Should be stickied. I do have some suggestions...

Use color coding and columns to make quick browsing of prices et cetera easier.

It would also be nice if you added a budget section.

color will take me a little bit as well as the columns. all the white is getting to my eyes too!!

kinda added a budget section at the bottom.

also noticed some of the links are broken. i will work on that now.
 

mdcomp

Classic Administrator
Joined
Nov 23, 2001
I stickied this. Good work, this is looking great so far. Keep working on it.
:)

Matt
 
OP
jiggamanjb

jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
Woo Hooo sticky time!!

update:

links are almost all updated. i am now trying some color schemes.

feedback is still appreciated!
 

Kilted Man

New Member
Joined
May 18, 2006
Location
Boston
Power Redefined

Thank you for posting such a well thought out and timely article, the more information that is made available by people such as yourself the better we manufactures can serve the customer, Well Done. (Kilted Man)
 

bignick

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Hey I don't know the history on aero-cool but they are making some great PSU's now. I have the 620W zerodba model and it's rock solid. They also make a 500W model. Here's a review http://www.cluboverclocker.com/reviews/power/aero_cool/zerodba_620/index.htm

I have a P4 630 overclocked and a 930 on the way incase those of you that are going to chime in and say "I hope you don't have a INTEL you plan to OC". The voltages don't budge no matter what I throw at it and it dead silent.
 

George Poncho

New Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Silenx Ixtrema Professional Series 600w

Hi I was wondering if you had a chance to try the Silenx Ixtrema Prof 600w PSU. I would like to know how you would rate it for the following:

1. Power
2. How quite it is
3. Would you recommend it and under what catagory would you put it under
 
OP
jiggamanjb

jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
Shell said:
I just bought an ENERMAX Liberty, because it was the best 620 watt PSU available withing a 20km radius when my OCZ PSU died.
http://www.enermax.com.tw/english/product_Display1.asp?PrID=5

Was this worth $190CDN?
It seems to be the best PSU I've ever owned looking at it's readings, but does this have a "history"?

It is an excellent PSU, which you should be happy with for many many years to come.

Hi I was wondering if you had a chance to try the Silenx Ixtrema Prof 600w PSU. I would like to know how you would rate it for the following:

1. Power
2. How quite it is
3. Would you recommend it and under what catagory would you put it under

No, I have not had a chance to look at it. I did a bit of review research and found that some liked it and some didn't. It is supposedly an extremly quite PSU, but some have said that it will overheat because of not enough cooling. I know that the Silenx name is recommened for a silent PSU usually.
 

orionlion82

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
first off, thank you for the list of PSU's to avoid.
its such a tricky subject.

second, let it be noted that most PSU's on the "to avoid" list have their place:
they can run pumps and fans safely enough,(unless they are known for fires) and come in handy for the "free" rigs that we all end up with in need of a PSU; slap some flavor of linux on and take off with.

ive discussed such a list as this with our own oklahoma wolf said it was as close to impossible as it gets. i sincerely applaud your efforts, and time will tell if this list is worth its salt i suppose.

regarding the ASPIRE 500 watt psu's and its brother/twin the ultra (the early x-connects ones from what i gather)
they are more or less the same PSU. (search for my thread about this) taiwan youngear.
ul lookup e126556

please make a great post better with some sources and refrences.
 

orionlion82

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
George Poncho said:
Hi I was wondering if you had a chance to try the Silenx Ixtrema Prof 600w PSU. I would like to know how you would rate it for the following:

1. Power
2. How quite it is
3. Would you recommend it and under what catagory would you put it under

silenx... search the forums for peter kim.

wellcome!
 
OP
jiggamanjb

jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
Yes, I do need to work on it more with references and sources. I basically put it out there so people, such as myself, would have a basic knowledge of what to buy and what not to. In the comming months I hope to tweak and upgrade this thread to something that everyone can depend on.

Like I said in my opening, I am no expert, far from it. So any help with this is much appreciated. Hopefully this helps one or two people from buying the wrong PSU and being ******ed about it :)
 

orionlion82

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
jiggamanjb said:
Yes, I do need to work on it more with references and sources. I basically put it out there so people, such as myself, would have a basic knowledge of what to buy and what not to. In the comming months I hope to tweak and upgrade this thread to something that everyone can depend on.

Like I said in my opening, I am no expert, far from it. So any help with this is much appreciated. Hopefully this helps one or two people from buying the wrong PSU and being ******ed about it :)

sweet. :beer:

youre gonna wanna play with this:
http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISEXT/1FRAME/index.htm

and allso take note that you need to really make sure the final version is as good as it gets. remember, that you are putting your "name" on it, and it is your work. many of the reasons a thread like this has yet to exist in this form.
hats off to ya.
 
OP
jiggamanjb

jiggamanjb

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Location
MI, USA
orionlion82 said:
sweet. :beer:

youre gonna wanna play with this:
http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISEXT/1FRAME/index.htm

and allso take note that you need to really make sure the final version is as good as it gets. remember, that you are putting your "name" on it, and it is your work. many of the reasons a thread like this has yet to exist in this form.
hats off to ya.

Oh man, you are getting me into this deep!! Better lay off the coors light for a while ;)