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RAID 5 vs Windows storage spaces parity

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fabulouscoops

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2004
I have 4 x 2 TB HDD's in Windows 10 storage spaces with parity giving 7.44 TB of space.
RAID 5 would yield 6 TB. RAID 10 would give 4 TB.
I know RAID 5 is not really recommended anymore but how does Storage Spaces achieve parity while giving you more space? Its not even using a whole drive.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I have no idea how it works...

Can you show a screenshot of Explorer though?

I'm wondering if the total space has to do with how much space you're using and parity (dynamic).
 
OP
fabulouscoops

fabulouscoops

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2004
Its saying file is too large, the screenshot was of dual monitors.
But I think you are right. I have 1.28 TB used and 5.98 free which seems to correspond with about 1.3 TB used for parity.
Cool
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Try to throw a huge (few GB so you notice) folder in there and see how it changes. ;)

For future reference, you can crop images easily in Paint or other similar apps (you can also take a shot of ONLY the in-focus window by holding down ALT and hitting PRT SCN). It's a 4MB limit IIRC. ;)
 
Last edited:
OP
fabulouscoops

fabulouscoops

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2004
I copied 60 GB of folders. Used and free changed but overall capacity did not.
I am now thinking I fell into the decimal vs binary trap.
7444 GB is 8 TB so disk management is telling me the size of the disks, not the effective space.
So the original question remains. How does storage spaces achieve parity?
Or do I not have parity and instead JBOD?
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Maybe this will help... :)

  • Simple (no resiliency): A simple storage space writes one copy of your data and doesn’t protect you from drive failures. It requires at least one drive.
  • Two-way mirror (default): A two-way mirror storage space writes two copies of your data, helping to protect you from a single drive failure. It requires at least two drives.
  • Three-way mirror: A three-way mirror storage space writes three copies of your data, helping to protect you from two simultaneous drive failures. It requires at least five drives.
  • Parity: A parity storage space writes your data with parity information, helping to protect you from a single drive failure. It requires at least three drives.
  • Dual parity: A dual parity storage space writes your data with parity information on two disks, helping to protect you from two drive failures. It requires at least five disks in the pool.