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Recomend a mechanical keyboard please.

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don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
I'm looking for a Cherry MX "brown" keyboard. I guess I have to spend $100 or more but if I do, I want it to count. So far I'm thinking hard on this one.


Backlit. Number pad. Spaced out arrow keys.

Used for light gaming and light office work. Mostly internet searching and emailing.
 

Dlaw

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Location
New York, USA
I have a real hard time recommending a hard core keyboard for light use. Microsoft's keyboards are very decent at the $50 range (yes, they are membrane, but I used one for heavy gaming for 2 years and it's still going strong). Why do you want/need a mechanical keyboard?
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
I've never heard of this until now but after some quick googling, very cool stuff. Although I'm not sure because I love a very click keyboard :rofl:

Comes in the Cherry Blue variety as well, like Neon mentioned.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
I'm confused by the O-ring recommendation. Please educate me.

O-rings are used to dampen the bottom of the keystroke.
Instead of having a solid surface to bottom the key out to, you have a soft surface with a bit of spring.

For me this resulted in both quieter keyboard operation and faster typing speeds.
 

ninjacore

Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2006
Location
OH
From this thread:

Speed-read most of this. Switch type is definitely personal preference. I've tried reds, blacks, greens, and Browns. Haven't tried any of the "alt switch type", but Topre is one brand/type which a lot of keyboard snobs tout as being the "penultimate" typing experience. I settled on Browns of the types I tried.

The only thing I'll add here is that there definitely is a difference in feel between keyboard brands. My first two boards with mx-browns were cooler master (Quickfire rapid and pro?). Both felt about the same.

I bottomed out very often and picked up some orings which made a difference in noise from bottoming out, but I wouldn't necessarily say they improved the typing experience. I was pretty happy with both of those boards for around a year or two.

About two months ago, I decided I wanted to try a different brand. Found a deal on a Ducky Premier with Browns and a nice set of PBT keycaps in the stock config. Immediately when I started typing on it, I knew I would never go back. The keycaps felt amazing compared to the stock, cheap plastic ones on the CM boards. It was like night and day.

The new Ducky went to the office, replacing the full size CM there and, of course, I couldn't keep the Rapid in its default configuration after having tasted the Ducky ;) I didn't really want to spend the money to replace both boards, so instead, I just grabbed another set of PBT keycaps and swapped them in for the Rapid's stock caps. Once again, the difference was night and day.

HOWEVER, there is still a noticeable difference, in my opinion between the Cooler Master Rapid and the Ducky Premier, despite them both now having essentially the same keycaps. The keys now feel the same to the touch, but keystrokes seem a little "harsher" with the CM. I feel more prone to bottoming out with it than the Ducky maybe? I'm not sure what it is. I can only assume that the "build quality" of the Ducky just makes bottoming out a more pleasant experience on the fingers than with the Cooler Master (I've removed the orings from both now, btw).

If you can find a Ducky Premier, I would not hesitate at all to suggest it. I'm sure price will play in here a bit; I think the ducky is ~$130 new and the CM are ~$100? It is ABSOLUTELY worth the difference, though. At the very least, I would try to find a board with PBT keycaps.

Orings will definitely silence things up a bit if you bottom out a lot. The only thing I didn't like about them is that they just reinforce bad habits (bottoming out). Mechanical keyboards are said to increase typing speed, improve accuracy, and decrease finger fatigue and a big reason for this is that they train you not to bottom out (if you have a switch type possessing the tactile bump). When I put the orings on my keyboards, there was actually a period of a few weeks where my fingers hurt a little bit after typing a bunch. I think this was due to a couple things: 1) I wasn't worried about the noise of bottoming out, so I jammed away at the keys and 2) the orings decreased the space between the keycap and the base plate such that bottoming out occurred sooner than without them.

As I sorta mentioned in that other thread, my opinion is that a quality set of keycaps really plays the biggest part in "typing experience". When I bought my Ducky (replacing a CM Storm), I put the orings on thinking I would it prefer it with them since I had grown accustomed to them on my CM boards. That lasted about 20 minutes and I removed them. The PBT keycaps on the Ducky are what I've found is the real difference-maker.

TL;DR

I would look for a keyboard that comes with PBT caps in its stock config. If you end up buying a board with cheap plastic caps, I would replace those before adding orings. If, at that point, you're still not happy with the experience or if you're just curious, then pickup the orings.