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Recommend a me a camera!

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bob4933

Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
I am SO green at photography, and I'd really like to "get into it".

So, I've done the research I can do... and I think I've narrowed it down to 3 cameras

Nikon D3300
Nikon D5300
Canon EOS T6

Shots will be EXCLUSIVELY still shots, no action; don't think Im gonna be doing long exposure (but i would like the option I suppose). I love love love macro shots.

If Im way off base here, I have no idea haha. Im kinda out of my element here. For the camera itself, I'd like to be around the 5-600$ mark. Just a hobby, not a profession.

Things I DONT need

- no selfie crap
- no wifi (if it HAS it, thats ok, I just dont want to spend extra on a feature im not really gonna use)
- no gps (same as wifi)
- mic quality is irrelevant

things I would LIKE, but arent mandatory

- 1080p 60fps recording
- a "starter" kit (with lenses, case, etc) thats worth a damn.


Im lost, help! :D
 

baditude_df

Northern Senior
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Based on what you've listed, I'd look for a Canon 70D. I have one and it's phenomenal! It's been replaced by the 80D now, so prices should be down roughly in your price range.
The kit lenses are pretty good optically and light weight, but are made of plastic so beware they don't tend to take much abuse.

PS: The Video capabilities are excellent, although that's not why I bought the camera. Also, the articulating screen and live view mode are extremely useful.
 
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mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Image quality differences between Nikon and Canon at a given price level are mostly irrelevant unless you want to get into some pointless online argument with someone. There are a lot of opportunities for that. As you get better, you find the hardware matters less and less.

So other factors may be more important. Do you know people with either system that might be able to help you or swap kit with? Nikon seems to be more popular in North America, Canon in most of the rest of world. Other factors, like availability of used kit can help going forwards. Also how each camera feels to you so if possible try before you buy.

I went Canon myself. On the low price Canon side, a tip is if you get it as a kit, make sure the lens is the IS version which is better enough over the non-IS version and the price shouldn't be that significant between them.

I have no idea about the video capabilities.
 

Jeff G

Member
Joined
May 22, 2016
Buy the cheapest of those you listed, whichever one is on sale for the lowest price is the one you should get.
Take all the money you save and buy nicer lenses.
Camera bodies come and go, lenses will stick with you forever.
All three of those cameras will produce great pictures once you learn to use them as long as you have a good lens. A poor lens or poor technique will produce poor pictures regardless of how much money you spend on the camera body.
I started with a D3000 many moons ago, I bought nice lenses as I grew with it and only upgraded the body years later for a few new features I really wanted on the current cameras. I still use my nice lenses on the new camera and in 10 years when I get yet another new body I will still use my nice lenses I bought years prior.
As far as Nikon vs Canon, go to a store that has both and play with them. Some prefer the layout of the Canon, some Nikon. Again, either will produce great pictures once you know how to use them.
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
D3300 is a wonderful camera. I highly recommend it. We use the starter zoom lens and a 35mm prime lens
 

JLK03F150

What have I done! Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Georgia
Canon has a refurb deal on the T6i and two kit lenses (18-55mm, 55-250mm, both IS) for $539. I've had the T3i and older versions of the same kit lenses for several years and have been happy with it all.
https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/...-ef-s-55-250mm-f-4-56-is-stm-lens-refurbished

I'd recommend taking a basic photography class to learn the in's & out's of you new hardware. Big waste of money to spend that kind of money on a camera & leave it set on AUTO, imo. My wife and I took a couple of 4 week classes and attended a close-up/macro 1 day workshop. All of it was time well spent to learn to get the most out of the camera & its lenses.
 
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hokiealumnus

Water Cooled Moderator
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
I was just about to come here and link just the deal that JLK did. That's a solid price, and a great pair of lenses to start with. The STM line is sharp and silent. :thup:

Re: Canon vs. Nikon, it's totally personal preference. IMHO, Canon's control scheme is more comfortable than Nikon, much more so on the lower-to-mid range. Low-to-mid range Nikons have their one control wheel on the rear where you use your thumb to control it. I very strongly prefer the primary wheel to be under my index finger where Canon puts it. When you get to the higher end (D7xxx and up), Nikon has both front and rear wheels, as does Canon, and that difference goes away.
 

habbajabba

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2005
Location
Oregon
https://light.co/
Light L16
28-150mm focal length and up to 48m pixel images. Looks like a smartphone and it's weatheproof as well.
Not quite yet available to the masses. Hopefully when it is I will have the funds to go for it. ~1200$ I think.
 
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JLK03F150

What have I done! Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Georgia
Wow habba, I remember hears there was going to be a camera that could take pictures across the field. This will allow for a deep depth of field (in focus across great distance) or a moveable shallow depth of field (out of focus is fixable!), and everything in between. Interesting to see what's done in camera vs software post processing.
 

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Lytro tried selling some lightfield cameras. Downside was that you ended up trading spatial resolution to obtain that depth info. For most uses, the downsides outweigh the benefits. I do believe that what I call computational photography will overtake conventional (single lens, single sensor) type designs for cost/size reasons, but it isn't there yet. That is, gathering and recombining data from multiple sources like the above linked device. It will still be limited by the same laws of physics, just that it uses them differently for its output.