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Resivoir Question

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Mentes

Registered
Joined
Sep 30, 2002
I might have spelled Res wrong, Anyhow, I have a question if heat dissipates in a larger amount of water more quickly...Would that make using a res, BETTER then T-line? If anyone has any hard data to back this up please post.
 

IFMU

The Xtreme Senior Nobody
Joined
Jun 21, 2001
From everything I have seen and heard, no one has been able to come up with results that would say which way would be better then the other.
It typically varies on the placement, size, type of pump and many more things before something could be really said.
Mostly, at least I think, it is more of a personal choice then anything. Some prefer it, others dont.
 

[EG]~NaTz~

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2002
Location
pittsburgh pa
think about it this way if u had a swiming pool. maybe 4 feet deep and oh lets say 20 feet wide the cup just about would not be ale to heat up that much water. and all you would need is a pump it all dependss on the size of the resovior. i have heard of people using big flat shallow tupperware bins with no rad getting temps about 10-12 above ambient. i beleive masked even did this for a while. and resovior is spelled resovior.....
 

masitti

Member
Joined
May 16, 2002
Location
Colorado
I don't think it would make much difference. I mean, in my setup, I more depend on my heatercore to disapate heat, not my method of filling/bleeding it. :confused:
 

EgeWorks

Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2002
Location
Melbourne, Australia
hehe - glad somebody can spell. In regards to a reservoir, in a closed loop system with a radiator/heatercore, it will be of little benefit as the heat generated will be easily dissapated by the radiator/heatercore.
 

[EG]~NaTz~

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2002
Location
pittsburgh pa
oops ok i cant spell eitther? but we have now gon to diciontary.com and got this result.


1. A natural or artificial pond or lake used for the storage and regulation of water.
2. A receptacle or chamber for storing a fluid.
3. An underground accumulation of petroleum or natural gas.
4. Anatomy. See cisterna.
5. A large or extra supply; a reserve: a reservoir of good will.
6. Medicine. An organism or a population that directly or indirectly transmits a pathogen while being virtually immune to its effects.

for grim spelled it correct.
 

SemiCycle

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
Hampton Roads. VA
Pla said:
With bigger res. the only effect will be that themperatue will be changing slower. But the end effect will be the same.

Every setup will be different. I know when I went from my 6x6x4 res to in-line use, my temps went up 4-6 degrees. Very strange. I rehooked up everything twice to make sure that the new temps where acurate. I then decided to go back to using my Junction Box res. I didn't change anything else about the other components in the system, or reset the WB. After re-installing the pump in the res, my temps went back down to their normal levels.
 

SemiCycle

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Location
Hampton Roads. VA
Maybe, Maybe not. The pump and heater core were much warmer to the touch, then when running in the res. I know the inlet flow on the pump is as unrestrictive as possible when running submerged. While running inline, the inlet was using 1/2 tubing.
 

grim

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Location
boston, ma
pumps work harder the more restriction they are pushing water thru and the harder they work the hotter they get
 

Pla

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2002
Location
San Francisco, CA
Pumps need to have easy inlet water.
Having res. ensures there is always water to the inlet.

With no res. and some back presure pump will suck water and in some cases the presure in the inlet will drop bellow dew point - you will get "air" in the pump and of course lower flow rate.
The flow rate will be decreased a lot because of back presure and the valve rotating in foam of water and air.

Back presure on the outlet is not so big problem for the pump - it will increase the presure in the outlet and the pump and will not produce any air.
The flow rate will be decreased less becase the valve is fully in water.

My setup is:
res. -> pump -> WB -> rad -> res
This way the flow rate is good, the only presure is between
pump -> WB
so less leaks...
If the rad is before the WB you may get lower themps but I prefer less leaks... :)

edit:
Also this way my rad can be placed outside the case where the air is cooler...
 
Last edited:

Skulemate

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2002
Location
Toronto, Canada
Pla said:
With no res. and some back presure pump will suck water and in some cases the presure in the inlet will drop bellow dew point - you will get "air" in the pump and of course lower flow rate.

If you're talking about cavatation, I think you mean vapour pressure rather than dew point. The dew point is the temperature to which air has to cool in order to reach saturation (i.e. where water vapour will form condensation).