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RJ45 wall jack (8P8C) and gigabit

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Stratus_ss

Overclockix Snake Charming Senior, Alt OS Content
Joined
Jan 24, 2006
Location
Ontario Canada
I have 2 gigabit switches that are seperated by about 30-45 feet. The cable runs through the wall and is terminated with a cat5 8P8C end and yet the switches only negotiate to 10/100 (occording to both switches)

I tried crimping the ends off with both males with the same result. Is it possible that there is something in the walls that is preventing the gigabit connection?

If I plug the switches into a computer (while they are in the same room) they negotiate to 1000 speeds so I have determined that both of the switches are functioning properly and that its not poor crimping on my part (as I crimped all the cables I am using)

I am relatively sure that the cable is cat5e and not just cat5 but I am not 100% sure on that. The cable was installed before I moved in last year by the electricians so based on that I am assuming the cable is 5e.

Any suggestions?
 

Diggrr

Underwater Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
I'd say that something is wrong with the cable. You can look at the sheathing to read if it's Cat5 or 5e, it should be printed on there with all the other cable information like conductor gauge etc.
They may have kinked the cable while pulling it through, or I've seen some electricians turned cablemen pull a length from each jack and splice them together...a terrible no no that will keep you at 10/100, or sometimes just 10. I've also seen these jokers use cat3 because it's what they use for phone systems quite often-it's on their truck, so it's handy.

Do you have basement access underneath the jacks/wirepath? I'd bypass with a new piece or Cat5e to at least make sure.
 
OP
Stratus_ss

Stratus_ss

Overclockix Snake Charming Senior, Alt OS Content
Joined
Jan 24, 2006
Location
Ontario Canada
I do have access to the basement. Aside from taping a new wire to the old one and pulling it through, I dont know how I would get the cable upstairs though.

I believe your right, I think it may be the cable. I might test at another place in the house to see. Thanks for the input
 

Diggrr

Underwater Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Taping the new one to the old one is a great way to go, I do it all the time. Just make sure you've played out enough slack from your box of wire that you don't get another kink in it.
Hopefully it's not stapled (which can also cause these problems) to the wall joists.

Really I could go on for hours about why electricians should not be allowed to do data cabling....they treat it like a door bell wire or something. Stinking Heathens!
 

SMTP

Registered
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Definitely check the cabling. If you have to do a new run but can't tape a new line and pull it up with the old one, you could try the washer trick. Just tie a heavy metal washer to a string and try to feed it down from the top, fishing it out from the basement.
 

FireMogle

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2001
Location
Lawrence, KS
I do have access to the basement. Aside from taping a new wire to the old one and pulling it through, I dont know how I would get the cable upstairs though.

I believe your right, I think it may be the cable. I might test at another place in the house to see. Thanks for the input

When I worked as a network install that was a very popular method to use. I would suggest getting some kind of wire/string that is long and very study between the two cables, makes the pull a little easier.
 

VinnyTAMU

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2005
Location
BCS, Texas
There are four points that I keep in mind when I install network cables (CAT 5/5e/6):


  1. Make sure to maintain a minimum bend radius (4 x Diameter of cable).
  2. When terminating cable ends make sure that no more than 0.5 inches of cable are un-stranded.
  3. Do not pull hard on then cable or install the cables taught (Do not subject to forces of more than 25 lb).
  4. Try to separate/distance network cables from wires/cables carrying electrical current.