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scsi or sata

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mateo

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2002
The "LC" means that its an 80-pin SCA drive (which is probably why its so cheap), so you'd need an adapter for it to work without a backplane.

If you can find an LW version for a similar price, go for it, since its cheap. You'll get the experience of setting up SCSI, which is always fun (not sure whether that's sarcasm or not :)). However, don't be so sure that its faster; recent cache and firmware enhancements are closing the gap between 7.2k and 10k drives.
 

Enablingwolf

Senior Member overclocking at t
Joined
Jun 14, 2004
If you get scuzzy set up right. It is amazing. The thing I found out. It can be tempermental. Make sure you add a bit more cooling than a normal drive. They do get a touch hotter than regular drives.

If you can set up a cheap array. Right on!! If you have to excede the cost of current tech on 7200 drives. I would regulate it to a file server. SCSI don't shine until it is in RAID though. Single drives rock, but scuzzy in RAID is were it is at. It is neat when you have to use terminators.

Good read if you don't know much about scuzzy.
http://docs.sun.com/source/801-6118-10/appendixa.html
 

Snugglebear

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2005
Those 36LPs are around five years old at this point. Overall lifespan notwithstanding, it's not going to perform up there with a modern ATA unit. Certainly the seek times will be faster than a modern ATA unit, but that will not make up for the lack of media transfer rates. This is just how things are, over time even the consumer-level equipment surpasses the enterprise in performance.

If you really want to play with SCSI, try finding a 10k or 15k unit that's less than two years old. Your u160 card is still perfectly capable and will be more than adequate for a single drive. 15k is definitely fun to play with; it takes a certain kind of person to appreciate drives that sound like turbines when spooling.

As for extra cooling, it's not really necessary. There was a time when I slapped drive bay coolers on my 15s, but honestly they're unnecessary. Even under heavy load the 15s get warm to the touch but no more. Give them some room to breathe, certainly, but don't worry about active airflow. Remember these things are built to survive in dense DCs even when the HVAC goes down.
 

mateo

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2002
Snugglebear said:
As for extra cooling, it's not really necessary. There was a time when I slapped drive bay coolers on my 15s, but honestly they're unnecessary. Even under heavy load the 15s get warm to the touch but no more. Give them some room to breathe, certainly, but don't worry about active airflow. Remember these things are built to survive in dense DCs even when the HVAC goes down.

I killed a Fujitsu 15K because of poor cooling, so I'd just make sure to have it at least behind an intake or something.

The thing with older drives is partly transfer rates, but also firmware, cache size, caching patterns, etc. Still, 36 bucks is hard to argue with if you just want to fool around and gain experience with a different interface.
 

datura3

Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Ah yes, scsi. I bought the maxtor version of that drive about 5-6 years ago. Man it was fast for it's time and was about 300 dollars back then. Now I use a raptor 10K which is almost as fast and is a LOT easier to set up. If you just want a fast drive, then spend the extra 50 bucks and get a 36g raptor. It will cost you 45 bucks for the scsi drive and the adapter. That is also assuming you have the proper cable. You can get a new raptor for about 100 dollars on ebay. It will save you hours of figuring out how to set up scsi properly. It can be quite tempermental. If you just want to play around, then go for it. You certainly will learn a lot and have hours of fun/pain.
 

Snugglebear

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2005
SCSI isn't really that tempermental. The first time you see an adapter's BIOS and all the jumpers it can be intimidating, but it's not all that bad once you get used to it. If you're chalking this one up for experience, yes, go ahead and get a SCSI drive and learn how to use it. If you want a fast drive to use, plus learn the interface, get a newer SCSI drive. If you just want something quick, get a raptor or equivalent.

As for killing SCSI drives with heat, I still haven't managed it after all these years. Some of those old Quantums (pre-Quaxtor) used to burn fingers if touched during operation, but no heat deaths there, either. With two of my 15s and a 10 right up against each other none of them died or came close to hot; this with no active airflow or vents nearby in the case.