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Serial ATA HD question

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EluSiOn

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2002
Location
SC, USA
I have question about Serial ATA Hard Drives

I only know Serial ATA are faster than ATA 133 but what is the adventage of Serial ATA? is it able to handle insane PCI mhz when Overclocked?

In addition, is there any Serial ATA RAID card out there? supporting RAID 5 would be a great PLUS.

Also, some people says IBM drives are better but some prefer Seagate Barracuda Serial ATA V, is there any other drive out there better than Barracuda Serial ATA V ? (not counting SCSI/Firewire/Fibre Channel Drives)
 

Top Hat Theater

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Jul 24, 2002
Location
Lost in Thought
smaller cable too so less clutter in the case. Currently, serial ATA is running at ATA150 (I think) but you won't really see any performance gains (same deal as with ATA133). The big advantage is serial ATA allows for much higher capacity drives.

~THT
 

BaldHeadedDork

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
The biggest advantage to S-ATA are for the major manufacturers. I've heard it will free an IRQ. That's not as important today as it was, say, five years ago. But it will help, especially on a mass production high end system with a ton of junkware installed.

But the biggest advantage will be the slightly reduced cost of cables. Don't laugh, I'm serious. Saving a dime by using smaller and simpler to manufacture S-ATA cables adds up to serious jack when you multiply it by two million units annually.

Which drive to recommend is almost impossible right now. Maxtor, Seagate and IBM have new series of drives coming out that look very good. But I haven't seen any reviews yet or played with one so I can't say.


BHD
 

Crash893

"The man in black fled across the desert,
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
i hear the tech will probably too out at about ata 350 or 300 not really sure

but another advatages is there is no more master slave drives
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
Other than reducing the cable clutter, the short term advantages
are small. The limitation is still the PCI bus. Total shared transfer
rate can't go over 133 MB/s. Of course, what drives can sustain
that rate. All this talk of higher transfer rate for the next geration
of SATA drives is bogus until we get drives/RAIDs that can keep
up and a faster PCI bus to carry the traffic.:(
 

Johnny Knoxville

Disabled
Joined
May 29, 2002
late next year pci-x will be released and it have 10 times the bandwidth of pci, it will be a completely different ball game with hard drives then
 

Stumpjumper5200

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pci/x sounds cool, but it won't be a different ball game just yet.

hard drives themselves have to get faster. not the bus, not the transfer technology, but the disk itself.

hard drives IMO suck. :D I'd like to have one huge block of RAM that's not volitile. (It's called magnetic ram, something scientists are playing with)

there has to be a better way, because we'll only be able to spin a disk so fast.
 

Crash893

"The man in black fled across the desert,
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
i never understood why they didnt put a second or third set of read write heads in the hdd

kinda like raid 0 built in

i always wanted to just make a bank of ram with all i have laying around here even if i did need an external power supply
 
OP
EluSiOn

EluSiOn

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Joined
Oct 31, 2002
Location
SC, USA
argh~~~! I really want to run RAID 5 with Serial ATA HD...... is there any cards out there do that?

I only know 3Ware Escalade 8500 series can do that... but it is about US$ 369, do you guys think it is worth it?
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
I own a Cenatek Rocket drive. While you can run tests to show
it's fast, it's not THAT fast. Mine's a 1 GB drive.

The problem is this company sells the drives with a BIOS chip that
completely prevents you from adding your own RAM. To upgrade
my drive I would have to get a BIOS (on the rocketdrive) upgrade
and buy RAM from them. They charge WAY too much.

This policy is completely unreasonable. I have spoken with them
a number of times. Can't get past it.

No, you can't just buy a 4 GB drive and have them populate it
with 1 GB.

In real life these drives and the software ramdrives have a very
narrow niche where they actually pay off.

Cenatek is a perfect example of a company which has an OK
product, but tries to control and screw it's customers. Kind
of like M$. :(
 
OP
EluSiOn

EluSiOn

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Oct 31, 2002
Location
SC, USA
Argh~~! I just got the idea from other forum

Promise FastTrak SX4000, Serial ATA Raid Card that supports 66 mhz and also Raid 5. Price tag @ amazingly low US$ 150

I think with NForce2 mobo it can become the OC king!
 

gingo

Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Anyone have a pic of the serial ATA cables? Are they rounded? It would be great to get rid of cable clutter, even with rounded IDE cables.

Are CDROM, CDRW, DVDROM, ect drives S-ATA compatible?
 
OP
EluSiOn

EluSiOn

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Joined
Oct 31, 2002
Location
SC, USA
go here.. http://www.3ware.com/products/cables.asp

serial ATA cable are smaller than IDE cables and

serial ATA cable would actually powers the HD. <---- NO TRUE

there are serial ATA convertors so your normal IDE can work with serial ATA via that converter.... there are some other better converter pics out there.... and the 3ware one sucks a bit
 
Last edited:

Stumpjumper5200

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Best 1/4 Mile Time: 13.57 @ 101.13
Wait, the serial ata cable would power the HD too? So you wouldn't need a molex connector??

I don't know, I haven't heard anything like that. That would be a big change, because now the motherboard would have to handle a lot more power.......
 

Crash893

"The man in black fled across the desert,
Joined
Mar 13, 2001
it still has a power connector

i dont know if its molex or not

it looked like a serial ata cable on the pic i was show in a mag
but it could be a molex or something ( i wouldnt imagen they would not have some sort of adapter)
 
OP
EluSiOn

EluSiOn

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2002
Location
SC, USA
rocketheads520.jpg

satacable520.jpg

conncomp560.jpg

03.jpg


b_0059_001.jpg


I think I am wrong about Serial ATA supply power to HD... I was confused when I see the convertors.... Storage Forum does not let you display IMG? how bizzare!

Serial ATA Specs:
The following excerpt quoted from Serial ATA 1.0 gold Technical Specifications as pertaining to our Technology Evaluation and possible eventual implementations.

Goals and objectives

Serial ATA is defined with the following goals and requirements listed in no particular order:

Primary inside-the-box storage connection (no outside the box).

Completely SW transparent w/ ATA (easy transition).

Low pin count for both host and devices (2 pairs).

Favorable (low) voltages.

Supports lower cost device architectures.

Higher performance than equivalent ATA (data rate, queuing, overlap) w/ scalability to higher.

Much better cabling/connectors (thin, flexible).

Includes efficient power delivery.

No software dependency. Relatively easy transition (price, IHV NRE and capital inventory.

risk, wide variety of devices at intro, etc.).

Power management and power consumption suitable for mobile use.

Allows roadmap spanning ~10 years.

Cable length comparable to ATA (<1 m).

Transfer rate exceeding best ATA (~150 MB/s) with scalability to higher rates.

Light protocol allowing overhead latencies to be minimized.

Asynchronous only (no isochronous requirements).

No Peer-peer transfer support (to/from host only).

Provides support for 1st party DMA access to host.

Cost competitive with equivalent parallel ATA solution at introduction (host + device + cable).

Storage device centric (no cameras/scanners/printers).

Easy installation/configuration (plug/play, no jumpers, no external terminators).

Single host (no multi-initiators or host/host networking).

from http://www.buildorbuy.org/serialata.html
 
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s[H]sIkuA

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2002
SATA Generation 1 (150) which is now available is still the beginning

Later there will be SATA II which will run at 300 and SATA III(600)

Although I don't know when ,maybe two or more years :D