• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Should I accept PSU return on ebay?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Hi all,

I'm getting mighty cheesed off with ebay because I've had several items sent out that I tested before they went and know they were working, sent out well packed and in anti-static, and a short while later I get "can I return it - it doesn't work" - something that I can ill afford being a poor student.

Well it happened again. I sent out a Corsair TX 650 that had barely been used, was 100% working, and several days later I get "your PSU doesn't work. Can I return it?"

Needless to say I was pretty ****ed off. It seems like somebody has taken a perfectly good item, broken it, and now wants to send it back. I decided to ask them a question though: I asked them if they took the PSU straight out of its packaging, put it straight in their PC and turned the power on. They said yes, and that's when they found it didn't work.

I asked this because it's been very cold in the whole UK recently, and with electrical items the advice is usually to leave them to sit when you've brought them in from a colder environment to a warmer one (or just from outside in general), because condensation is likely to form, which could short them out if you switch them on there and then. This is especially likely to happen in cold weather. Now the buyer has admitted they didn't wait at all from it coming in from the cold, does anybody think I have a valid reason for refusing the return?

Are PSUs sensitive to that kind of thing? Can anybody think of anything else it could be?

Cheers
DD
 

Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
It could be somebody trying to pull a switch on you, keeping the working one and sending back one they previously blew up.

You could mention to them that you will check it thoroughly for the serial number and secret markings you made on it (even if you didn't make a mark or record the serial number), and see how they react.

However, it could also be that the PSU works fine and they just had a bad motherboard or something.
 

madhatter256

Special Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Location
CFL
However, it could also be that the PSU works fine and they just had a bad motherboard or something.

Usually it is. For some reason, people who buy PC components tend to now know what they are buying. Which is why I always sell 'as-is' regardless if it's brand new in box, still sealed.

Good luck with that.
 
OP
D

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
They reckon to have had it checked over by some computer company or something. Was undoubtedly trying to sell them one of their own. Maybe they fried mine surreptitiously as they were 'testing' it. I had somebody once 'test' a car battery and declare it to be flat, and sold me a replacement. Later I was able to test it and found out that it was working just fine. Never went back there again.

Is what I mentioned valid grounds for refusing the return though?
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Get a black light pen (SilverSinkSam sells them in classifieds), and mark anything you sell with your name or something that you could tell is faked (in case you get a smart scammer with their own black light pen), so that any returns you can verify are actually the same item you sold. Also, try to specify in your listings that the buyer is responsible for shipping charges on returns. I just don't sell computer stuff on eBay at all anymore; one too many scammers trying to steal my items and/or money. You might even do what madhatter256 said and just sell them "as-is", and not have to deal with scammers.
 

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Close to the San Andreas Fault
Ebay of course will encourage sellers to offer some kind of Returns Policy. My policy: no returns, period. I test and make sure what I sell is in working order when I put it in the shipping box. I refuse to offer returns because I am not a big seller with lots of inventory & cash on hand. Furthermore, just because some moron(there's plenty of them on ebay) FUBARs the item I sold, doesn't make me responsible for reimbursing him for his own stupidity.

...it's just the way it's gotta be.
 
OP
D

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
I had my returns policy on the auction as 'no returns', but I think ebay forces you to accept returns on items that are judged not as described.

What about the condensation thing? Does that seem like adequate grounds?
 

tinymouse2

Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2009
Location
Surrey, England
Do you have the order form for the PSU? It might tell you the model number so if he sends it back you can check if it's the same PSU you sent out or not.

Unless ebay has a go at you I would tell him to go *blanked out worked* himself. A guy did this when I sold 2 19" monitors a while ago. He got them for 120 quid each (they were still about 180 new and hadn't been used much) and he said one didn't work and I said I would have a look at it.
He didn't realise that I had the model number and I reported him and kept the monitor! (ebays suggestion, I didn't want to argue with them =P)
 

Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
What about the condensation thing? Does that seem like adequate grounds?

Honestly... it seems pretty shaky, at best. You have to figure that the box and packaging served not only as an insulator, but also for absorbing moisture. If it had just been the bare unit sitting out on the front porch, then immediately brought into a well-heated house and turned on, then there could be a problem, but when you factor in the packing materials and the time it takes to unpack and install a PSU, it's really unlikely that condensation is the problem.

Do you have the order form for the PSU? It might tell you the model number

Maybe you just have your terms mixed up, but the model number won't do much good... it's the serial number you need.
 

madhatter256

Special Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Location
CFL
The condensation thing can happen, but in extreme temperature differences. The PSU has to be ice cold AND has to have been exposed to the atmosphere since there's water in the air, and it has to be pretty humid for that much water to form to bridge connections.

Do what you think is best. Hopefully the PSU is under manufacturer's warranty and if there's no 'burning' smell coming from it, you might be able to send it in for a replacement.
 

Xtreme Barton

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2004
did you having tracking info when you sent it ?? how long after they received it did they ask for return ??
 

jmdixon85

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Location
Cumbria (UK)
Theres a lot of this is happening lately on ebay. As a seller with 100% positive feedback I've had this happen to me a few times. I've sold quite a lot of RAM on ebay and had about three complaints that some of the DIMMS do not work. Once it was sorted when I asked the buyer to try the DIMMS in another board, and they worked. One buyer never emailed back when I told then it may be a compatibilty issue, but they left positive feedback anyway. (I will always refund if the item is returned working)

But one sale "REALLY" p****d me off! I sold a 2x2GB Corsair XMS DHX DDR2 a while back to someone in Italy for around £50 + P&P. About 15 days later I get an email in very bad English saying the RAM will not work and what do I intend to do about it. Now the RAM was tested with memtest (also had been in use for months), packed in its retail pakaging, put in a anti-static bag and had about 2 inches of foam around them in a box. There was no way they got damaged during transport. In the email it said something like "the memories would not seat properly and pc wont boot". So it was obvious that the buyer had forced them into the wrong type of slot (DDR1, SDRAM??) and fried them.

Now this is the bit where some of you may dislike me very much, but here goes:

I knew that for paypal to force me to refund the buyer that they needed proof and tracking info that the item had been posted back to me. So I wasn't going to let this guy rip me off! I told him to post the DIMMS back to me the cheapest way for a full refund. Then when he put in a paypal claim against me he had no chance of getting a refund. Don't get me wrong if the RAM came back and worked (it didn't) I would have refunded him but I wasn't loosing out be course he didn't know what he was doing.

*Prepares to recieve a lecture* :chair:
 
OP
D

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Ebay and Paypal are so incredibly biased against sellers that you're forced to take it into your own hands sometimes. One incident that shocked me was when I purchased a computer from somebody else on ebay, which turned out to have a problem with the cpu. I opened a dispute on paypal (to be safe), and paypal actually extracted the full sum of money from the seller's bank account before I'd even sent the computer back. And he wasn't being uncooperative. I'm worried about the day something like that happens to me and the buyer simply doesn't bother to send the item back.

I'm trying to get hold of the instruction booklet from Corsair to see if it explicitly states the thing about leaving it to stand. If it does I'm definitely refusing the return.

That's an interesting idea about the postage. How did you avoid getting your 100% feedback rating ruined by that buyer?

I think I may have a problem RMAing the PSU as it came in a computer that I bought on ebay. It's really low usage but still, rather too much of a paper chain there maybe. And posting it to Corsair in california is likely to be costly.
 

jmdixon85

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Location
Cumbria (UK)
Seems strange that you weren't required to provide tracking as proof as returning to the buyer? Unless this was a long time ago? I'm not sure if he just didn't leave feedback or ebay banned him from the transaction.
 

Joeteck

Retired
Joined
Oct 5, 2001
Location
Long Island
Do you have the serial number off of it? If so, then you can see if they're scamming you... if it happens to be different..

whats your ebay ID?
 
OP
D

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
It was recent - about 2 months ago. Paypal don't always follow their procedures it seems. I have the serial from one of my sales photos, but I don't think they're going to be doing a switcheroo on me - they also have 100% feedback on over 100 transactions. Why do you want my ebay id?
 

Neuromancer

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Location
Tau'ri
Accept the return and test it out. If it works tell them they can pay the return postage and have it shipped back.

What do you have listed under your return policy?

If I bought a PSU off of eBay and it did not work I would be ****ED.

Coming up with a "pulled it off the porch and plugged it in" looks more like you are coming up with an excuse. You are looking for ways to avoid a refund. Not something a good seller does.

TBH in 5 years of selling on eBay I have had no trouble with buyers only sellers.
 
Last edited:
OP
D

Dangerous_Dave

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Accept the return and test it out. If it works tell them they can pay the return postage and have it shipped back.

What do you have listed under your return policy?

If I bought a PSU off of you and it did not work I would be ****ED.

Coming up with a "pulled it off the porch and plugged it in" looks more like you are coming up with an excuse.

TBH in 5 years of selling on eBay I have had no trouble with buyers only sellers.


Then you must either be selling nothing at all or housebricks. In case you missed the above discussion, it was tested and found to be working before it was sent out. Now a virtually brand new PSU has somehow come up not working.

The subject of the thread isn't "I received a PSU and it didn't work".