• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Solder Cu Block

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Liss

Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Location
Toronto: The Capital of Canada
This is the method that im trying but it doesn't seem to work.

Flux the Cu block, heat the block with a blow torch, apply solder to fluxed areas. And this doesn't seem to work at all.

What am I doing wrong? Thanks.
 

Onlypro

Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2003
Location
Ottawa Ontario Canada
That method takes a certain degree of skill/experience.

I speak from experince, I have also had trouble sealing blocks that way.

If that method isnt working at all maybe you need to heat the base up more.

I dislike using solder to seal blocks cause the blocks might warp under the extreme heat if the block is not heated evenly properly.
 

Onlypro

Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2003
Location
Ottawa Ontario Canada
What type of block are you soldering, and where are you soldering it?

I know from my block the copper had to be heated almost until It was red in order for the solder to seal properly. Dont blow on the solder with the torch directly or it will just bead off.
 

mateo88

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2002
Location
San Marcos, Texas
If you've got an electric stove, use that to solder. This way is much more simple. Just place the block on the stove and heat it up. Put the solder wherever it seems necessary. I've used this method several times with success.
 

AndrusLRoc

Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Location
Kernersville, NC
Also make sure that whatever you're trying to heat your block on isn't soaking up some of the heat, I've tried to solder blocks sitting on my vice, and it's a no go, I usually try to put it on wood or something when I solder my blocks now. Goop works good to seal blocks too, but I just trust solder more I suppose. :D

-Andy
 

Sssnake

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2003
Location
sweden
ehrmm..

Maybe this way will work, it has for me...

apply flux, heat the bottom and apply solder evenly. then put top on and heat it until the sloder melts. if possibly, apply even pressure to the block until it cools down


Also try using a brick or similar to work on, that should help keeping the heat from slipping away :)
 

squeakygeek

Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2003
Location
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
Liss said:
This is the method that im trying but it doesn't seem to work.

Flux the Cu block, heat the block with a blow torch, apply solder to fluxed areas. And this doesn't seem to work at all.

What am I doing wrong? Thanks.

I don't understand how so many people are trying to help you without first asking what you mean by "doesn't seem to work at all". What exactly happens?
 

BladeRunner

Yoda of Silent cooling
Joined
Jul 30, 2001
Location
Chesterfield Uk
I've found that 2mm copper plate I've used quite often in block builds shows no sign of distortion when heated, even if it's heated unevenly. I can get away with 1.5mm too if its not an overly large piece, but 1mm does warp or misshape easily.

This is using electrical solder with either a "blue Flame" or regular plumbing blow lamp with butane/propane mix, If you are using welding gas temps you certainly could get it too hot, and possibly cause warping.

I trust soldering more than any other block sealing method myself, but it is a skill you need to practise to learn how to do. Once you get the knack its very easy, simple and quick to do.

I won't post it in the thread because there is a lot of detail so have a read HERE, as I've soldered large copper blocks together using the method in the text. About the only thing I've changed is using the wood and I now use a small marble slab that was a scrap piece from a stone masons. The Marble can be warmed up a little before you start and once it's heated up by the blow lamp on the copper pieces it won't keep sucking it away like a metal vice. You should practise with some off cuts until you become proficient.

Another thing I've learned is you must have an escape hole, (the block can't be fully sealed, but needs a barb hole or smaller pilot hole if you can't position the barbs until it's soldered). If not the hot gases will expand in the sealed block insides and escape as it cools possibly creating small weep channels in the solder joint.

If none of that helps....... repost with more specifics like squeakygeek says :)