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SSD very slow all of a sudden

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theoverclocker9

Registered
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Hello,
I am experiencing some issues with my Samsung 840 SSD.
Everything began when I was adding a case cooling fan to my fanless GPU,and I started the PC without the GPU.
Then I placed the GPU and started the PC again.
The SSD became very,very slow and even couldn't boot Win 10; then I tried to reinstall the OS but the process of the installation freezed.
Then I booted Ubuntu from an USB drive and that worked ; after that I somehow managed to install Ubuntu and it installed fine.
After that I formated the SSD and reinstalled Win 10, and it worked like a charm for 3-4 days.
But a few days ago the SSD became slow all of a sudden,so slow like the previous time.
I booted Ubuntu from an USB , and scanned the SSD for errors but it passed all of the tests correctly.

Please tell me how can I make the SSD work as it should?
I am trying to install an OS to it,but it doesn't want.
Please help me.
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Have you run a speed test on it? Atto?

Reseat cables...

Run smart diagnostic? Hard disk sentinal?
 

bmwbaxter

Joined
Jun 9, 2010
Clear Cmos, load optimized defaults and try again. If that doesn't work, try a different sata cable and port?
 
OP
T

theoverclocker9

Registered
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Have you run a speed test on it? Atto?

Reseat cables...

Run smart diagnostic? Hard disk sentinal?

Please tell me which diagnostics software I can use,keeping in mind that I can only boot Ubuntu from an USB drive?

- - - Auto-Merged Double Post - - -

Clear Cmos, load optimized defaults and try again. If that doesn't work, try a different sata cable and port?

I've already cleared the CMOS and loaded optmized defaults.I've also tried different ports,and the cable is only a few months old.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Sorry. I don't know of any Linux SSD tests.

Try using the drive as a slave in another PC (w/ Windows) to test it.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Sorry. I don't know of any Linux SSD tests. Someone with more knowledge on that should come by and help. :)
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I'm thinking the drive is failing. How long has it been in service? How full was it? The rule of thumb is to not let SSDs get more than 75% full or the performance can degrade dramatically.

When the drive was working did you frequently perform a lot of maintenance operations like defrag or chkdsk? Those are things are appropriate for a spinner hard drive but can cause premature failure of an SSD. SSDs do not benefit from those kind of maintenance operations and because they involve a lot of writes and rewrites they hasten the failure of the drive.

Did you check to see if TRIM was enabled on the drive or did you disable it? TRIM levels the wear on solid state drives and if disabled they will fail sooner.
 
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OP
T

theoverclocker9

Registered
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Do you have another HDD or SSD you can install windows on then check the bad smasung 840 that way?

No,no I have only that SSD drive.

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I'm thinking the drive is failing. How long has it been in service? How full was it? The rule of thumb is to not let SSDs get more than 75% full or the performance can degrade dramatically.

When the drive was working did you frequently perform a lot of maintenance operations like defrag or chkdsk? Those are things are appropriate for a spinner hard drive but can cause premature failure of an SSD. SSDs do not benefit from those kind of maintenance operations and because they involve a lot of writes and rewrites they hasten the failure of the drive.

Did you check to see if TRIM was enabled on the drive or did you disable it? TRIM levels the wear on solid state drives and if disabled they will fail sooner.

The SSD is not too old .

BTW here you are some screenshots from the Ubuntu SSD testing utility:
Screenshot from 2020-06-05 14-59-54.png
Screenshot from 2020-06-05 15-03-31.png
 

bmwbaxter

Joined
Jun 9, 2010
Try formatting the drive in linux, I had an issue once on an old OCZ VERTEX SSD which got fixed after I formatted in linux. Then try the reinstall.
 
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theoverclocker9

Registered
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Try formatting the drive in linux, I had an issue once on an old OCZ VERTEX SSD which got fixed after I formatted in linux. Then try the reinstall.

I am trying to format it , but it doesn't want to format...

I can't create a partition.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
The Linux benchmark is reporting the capacity of the disk to be 120gb. Did you tell the Linux installer to use less than the full capcity?

If you had access to another Windows computer I would use the diskpart clean option from Power shell to destroy all data and partitions on the drive. There may be an equivalent in Linux.
 
OP
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theoverclocker9

Registered
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
The Linux benchmark is reporting the capacity of the disk to be 120gb. Did you tell the Linux installer to use less than the full capcity?

If you had access to another Windows computer I would use the diskpart clean option from Power shell to destroy all data and partitions on the drive. There may be an equivalent in Linux.

I wiped the SSD via Ubuntu booting from an USB ,installed Ubuntu and it was working fine.
Then I formatted it and installed Win 10,it was working fine untill I shutted down the PC.
When I turned the PC on again,it was very very slow.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You didn't respond to my main concern about Linux showing that the SSD is only 120gb.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
The easiest way to "reset" the drive and be sure that everything is correctly set is to use diskpart in windows (7/8/10). Simply command prompt (cmd) -> diskpart -> list disk -> select disk *disk number from the list* -> clean all ... it will set 0 in all cells and clean additional area of the drive. It will take a while but usually helps with any performance issues if the drive is not damaged in some way.
 

HankB

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
Beautiful Sunny Winfield
The easiest way to "reset" the drive and be sure that everything is correctly set is to use diskpart in windows (7/8/10). Simply command prompt (cmd) -> diskpart -> list disk -> select disk *disk number from the list* -> clean all ... it will set 0 in all cells and clean additional area of the drive. It will take a while but usually helps with any performance issues if the drive is not damaged in some way.

Do you know if that performs a secure erase or just overwrites all visible sectors of the drive?
 

bmwbaxter

Joined
Jun 9, 2010
AFAIK is erases all partitions and overwrites every bit to a 0. So I believe it is a secure erase. No real way of getting data off the drive after that.