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Thermal Paste Application Techniques

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[email protected]

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Joined
Apr 7, 2016
Location
Israel
Its true but why does 2c matter in full load, Even if i had like 80c load i wouldnt change how i applied the thermal paste just for these 2c
 

montaillou

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Location
US West Coast
I read the article and I don't see how you can get bubbles unless the paste is globbed on. I use a credit card and spread a rice sized portion over the entire card and end up probably wiping half off leaving me with a smooth & very thin coating. I've never seen an air bubble.

Is it really time consuming for people to spread paste? What's it take 30 seconds? 60?
 

[email protected]

Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2016
Location
Israel
I read the article and I don't see how you can get bubbles unless the paste is globbed on. I use a credit card and spread a rice sized portion over the entire card and end up probably wiping half off leaving me with a smooth & very thin coating. I've never seen an air bubble.

Is it really time consuming for people to spread paste? What's it take 30 seconds? 60?

You can use fingers too! :p
 

knoober

Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2015
I have read a few times that coverage over the entire IHS is not important. Instead that the area over the die is the most important for heat transfer, meaning that any of these is good depending on what the die shape on your processor is like. Ive read articles on Haswell, for instance (sorry no links as it was casual reading) is okay with a line across center of the IHS, where a FX will be fine with a grain of rice method as long as the spread is centered over the die. It was an informative article, but I would have liked to see the issue of different die sizes and placements addressed.
 

Mr.Scott

Beamed Me Up!
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Which isn't what he said ;)

I'll just stick to not spreading paste and letting the heatsink do it... lol!
I know what he said.
I was just mentioning the plastic bag because this is the old school method.
Sometimes you have to spread by hand. If you do not get 100% coverage on the older CPU's that take 2-4v vcore, they will cook as soon as you turn the power on. Bare die CPU's should be covered 100% also. 1 hot spot will kill it in a second.
 

ATMINSIDE

Sim Racing Aficionado Co-Owner
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
I know what he said.
I was just mentioning the plastic bag because this is the old school method.
Sometimes you have to spread by hand. If you do not get 100% coverage on the older CPU's that take 2-4v vcore, they will cook as soon as you turn the power on. Bare die CPU's should be covered 100% also. 1 hot spot will kill it in a second.

Oh, I agree, legacy hardware is 100% different from our modern hardware. Especially anything bare die, but it's also easier to cover a die than an IHS.
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Oh, I agree, legacy hardware is 100% different from our modern hardware. Especially anything bare die, but it's also easier to cover a die than an IHS.

The legacy hardware is no different than current. You use the spread method when renewing thermal compound under Intel IHS. I do the same spread method with de-lidded AMD chips and block to die applications. (and have done quite a few Intels too)
 

[email protected]

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Apr 7, 2016
Location
Israel
The legacy hardware is no different than current. You use the spread method when renewing thermal compound under Intel IHS. I do the same spread method with de-lidded AMD chips and block to die applications. (and have done quite a few Intels too)

It is different, It was more expensive and it ran hotter. Correct me if im wrong :p.