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Thideras's Scythe Orochi review

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Automata

Destroyer of Empires and Use
Joined
May 15, 2006
The page break kind of ruined it, here is the first page

Part 1


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RESULTS:

After many hours of testing (around 20 hours total), I have finished the testing.

We used a total of 6 different fan configurations:
1) Fanless
2) Stock Fan (500rpm, 29cfm, 10.8db)
3) Yate Loon (Low speed, 1350rpm, 47cfm, 28)
4) Yate Loon (Medium speed, 1650rpm, 70cfm, 33db)
5) Yate Loon (High speed, 2200rpm, 88cfm, 40db)
6) Delta 38mm (EFB1212SHE, 3700rpm, 141cfm, 52.5db)

While we did test higher CFM fans, we need to concentrate on the lower speed/fanless configurations since that is what the Orochi is made for. The reason that it does better with low speed fans is the large fin spacing. I will still show results for all the fans, but please keep in mind that it isn't made for them.

Before I start with the results, here is the Estimated Wattage for my processor. Please note that these are estimated wattages based off of Intel's TDP (Thermal Design Power); this is 130 watts at stock speeds and voltages. We use THIS utility to calculate the wattages. You can do the same with your processor.

SS-20090419-142222.jpg

Here is a overview of the delta temperature (difference between actual processor temperature and ambient) for all fans:

SS-20090419-142843.jpg

The reason that Fanless only has 1 result and a few others are 'missing' bars is that they exceeded the safety threshold of 85 celcius. Fanless is not shown in any further graphs except C/W.

SS-20090419-142511.jpg

With the stock fan, we were able to test up to 3.6GHz (estimated 156 watts) and keep temperatures under the safety threshold. Please note that this is also delta and NOT actual processor temperatures. Delta is the difference between actual processor temperature and ambient.

SS-20090419-142541.jpg

With the Low Speed Yate Loon fan, we were able to test up to 3.8GHz (estimated 186 watts) and keep temperatures under the safety threshold. This graph shows the delta temperature. Delta is the difference between actual processor temperature and ambient.

SS-20090419-142617.jpg

With the Medium Speed Yate Loon fan, we were able to test up to 3.8GHz (estimated 186 watts) and keep temperatures under the safety threshold. This graph shows the delta temperature. Delta is the difference between actual processor temperature and ambient.

SS-20090419-142638.jpg

With the High Speed Yate Loon fan, we were able to test up to 3.8GHz (estimated 186 watts) and keep temperatures under the safety threshold. This graph shows the delta temperature. Delta is the difference between actual processor temperature and ambient.

SS-20090419-142726.jpg

For the final test, we put on a Delta 38mm (EFB1212SHE) fan. We were able to test up to 3.8GHz (estimated 186 watts) and keep temperatures under the safety threshold. This graph shows the delta temperature. Delta is the difference between actual processor temperature and ambient.

The last graph I will show you is the Average C/W. To obtain C/W, you divide the delta temperature by the wattage; you want the lowest number possible. If you notice during the Stock Fan testing, the C/W is showing strange numbers. I believe this to be an error in out testing. Even a 1 celcius difference in the testing can throw the numbers way off.

SS-20090419-142751.jpg

SUMMARIZED RESULTS:

Even though this heatsink could not take more than 3.8GHz from my quad (186 watts), I'm very impressed. With passive cooling or low speed fans, it does very well (as expected). Adding high speed fans has large diminishing returns because of the fin spacing. The program I use (Core Damage) makes the processor put out more heat than Prime, Orthos or even TAT. If you are going to be using this on a system where silence is key, I highly recommend this heatsink as long as you have the case to house it. If you are considering this heatsink, you should look at the C/W rating for the different wattage outputs and compare these to our other reviews. Also, make sure that you won't have any mounting issues before considering this heatsink. First find what your estimated processor wattage is using THIS utility. Second, decide what fan you want and get its cfm rating. Lastly, use the above graphs to determine how this heatsink will perform. This allows you to directly compare heatsinks that are otherwise not comparable, which makes these results very valuable.

Pros:
Excellent passive/low fan speed operation
Dissipates a substantial amount heat

Cons:
Size
Mounting

Thideras
 
Last edited:

Automata

Destroyer of Empires and Use
Joined
May 15, 2006
All uploaded. Please excuse any formatting problems, this was a direct copy from the TXT backup that I had.
 

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
wow were you busy,lots of fans!! temps look nice with some low yates, perfect! thanks T!!
 

Neuromancer

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Location
Tau'ri
How odd it is that a sink with such low fin density, (from the pics) sees such a HUGE benefit from running the 38mm Delta fan...