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TIMM recomendations?

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hipster

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Location
Upstate, NewYork
Hey everybody.....
I'm gettin' my stuff together and was wondering what timm to get? I hear the NB needs to be reapplied on the Ai7. I usually buy from ZZF or newegg. Thanks
 
OP
H

hipster

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Location
Upstate, NewYork
Thanks I'll have to see if I can locate it locally. What about that CPU deal though? Once I put it on, I void the warranty? But on the other hand, it works wonders!
 

nikhsub1

Unoriginal Macho Moderator
Joined
Oct 12, 2001
Location
Los Angeles
hipster said:
Isn't arctic silver and stuff like that called timm or thermal paste?
TIM not TIMM... TIM = Thermal Interface Material. Yes use it on your CPU, I wouldn't use the stock TIM ever.
 

larva

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
The stock TIM on the P4 heatsinks actually works pretty well. It's a thin aluminum sheet coated with an effective Bergquist TIM. It is not as good once the sink is re-mounted a few times though.

The stock TIM on Abit northbridges isn't as good. They have a thick layer of the pink bubble-gum crap on them with a dab of real white thermal compond on top of it. I clean both off (WD40 melts the bubble gum, clean with alcohol after). I use AS3 or AS5 for both northbridge and cpu, but even quality white thermal compound work pretty close to as well.

Yes, Intel my complain if you try to RMA your chip without the original heatsink with its TIM intact. The smart play here is to use the stock TIM on the retail heatsink as long as you intend to use it, and then upgrade to an aftermarket heatsink and AS5 at that time. Or get the real heatsink now.
 
OP
H

hipster

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Location
Upstate, NewYork
Thanks larva for the tim! I mean tip. I've also read alittle bit about lapping the surfaces before applting tim, what ta' ya'think probably a good idea just to take 'er down a little? I suppose if all this stuff is a preety big help I should plan to do it initially otherwise it'll probably never get done uh? Also the NB, replacing the stock tim, will that just "pull off or what? I read somewhere a guy used a piece of floss to get under it I believe?
 

larva

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
larva said:
The stock TIM on Abit northbridges isn't as good. They have a thick layer of the pink bubble-gum crap on them with a dab of real white thermal compond on top of it. I clean both off (WD40 melts the bubble gum, clean with alcohol after). I use AS3 or AS5 for both northbridge and cpu, but even quality white thermal compound work pretty close to as well.

As far as lapping, I don't recommend it. Only when you have a really uneven finish does it help. And it is easy to end up with a surface that is smoother, but not as flat. Only do this if you have an industrial-grade glass plate to surface on, or a precision stone surface plate. Your finished product can only be as flat as the surface plate, and unless you have a good one it may be flatter to start with than you can realistically produce. And there is a learning curve before you get really good results.

I've used this method to surface small engine cylinder heads and blocks for 20 years. It does take a litle more expertise and practice than most would have you believe.
 

batboy

Senior Moment
Joined
Jan 12, 2001
Location
Kansas, USA
Guess I have a really nice flat piece of plate glass, because every heatsink I've lapped showed definite improvements in cooling. It does require patience and you do need to be careful about keeping the heatsink square on the sandpaper (I use automotive wet/dry sandpaper in 400, 600, 800, and 1000 grades). Yes, you do need a perfectly flat surface. A thick piece of plate glass works for me.