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TheNewGuy

Registered
Joined
Oct 27, 2002
I just finished builiding my new comp(using a 350 watt ps) and i am concerned that i may be pulling too much power. I currently have a cable modem, router, creative soundworks 5.1 receiver, monitor, printer, television, (plus the cpu) and a light using a 60 watt bulb all plugged into outlets within the same room( most are plugged into the surge protector) i checked my breaker and i have 15amps alotted for my living room and this bedroom( the ac is on a seperate 20 amp breaker) i currently do not plan to add anymore appliances/ electronics to this room. am i pulling too much power? is this bad for my comp/ other appliances? when i turn on the t.v., the lights in the room dim and my monitor flickers just a little bit. it only occurs for approx 1/2 second. i am concerned because my cpu voltage fluctuated b/t 1.4 and 1.5 volts. i did a search and could not come up with a definitive answer to these questions . any help would be greatly appreciated!
thanx
 

Disputant

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
Doubt it, if I were concerned about it, I guess I may be inclined to put a UPS power backup on my computer to prevent constant surges from eventually hurting my components, or try running your more sensitive pc off another breaker. Constant surges like that can cause issues.
 
OP
TheNewGuy

TheNewGuy

Registered
Joined
Oct 27, 2002
i have a belkin surge protector, which my computer is plugged into. will this be enough, or should i invest in a UPS?
 

Disputant

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
UPSs are great, though before I spend any money I would simply run a drop cord to another room to see if perhaps that breaker is overloaded. I would sleep better with an APC backup though, your power goes out and you have like 20+ minutes of juice stored in that thing until your pc shuts down.

Those power supplies are still affected by some surges though, unfortunately so I would run the drop cord first. But if lightning hits your house, there is a better chance your pc will not be on fire.
 

Stedeman

The Half Asleep Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Location
Lewiston Maine
Disputant said:
UPSs are great, though before I spend any money I would simply run a drop cord to another room to see if perhaps that breaker is overloaded. I would sleep better with an APC backup though, your power goes out and you have like 20+ minutes of juice stored in that thing until your pc shuts down.

Those power supplies are still affected by some surges though, unfortunately so I would run the drop cord first. But if lightning hits your house, there is a better chance your pc will not be on fire.
yes and no a "true ups" will run your system off its battery all the time where as a "regular ups" will run you off the ac till you get a drop/spike then kick in
 

Disputant

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
Stedeman said:
yes and no a "true ups" will run your system off its battery all the time where as a "regular ups" will run you off the ac till you get a drop/spike then kick in

Ok so define a true UPS backup. I maintained 240 Unix servers on APC UPS power backups supplies for several years. In my experience they saved my **s 98 % of the time, but every so often I got spicked so bad they failed. Out of that many servers, that was acceptable for me because I had the backups in place. Usually in Florida where there are more lightning storms I got nailed harder, but then again nothing is bullet proof. imho
 

Stedeman

The Half Asleep Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Location
Lewiston Maine
*In a "true ups" you will always run off the ups battery (an alternating square wave - very stable) and the ups will charges the batteries most of the time (this also means you replace the batteries more often)

In a "regular ups" you run off the line current (test and see - using a multi-meter in the ac socket watch the volts move up and down 10-20V) the ups will only kick in after you hit a thresh hold limit (it takes time to switch witch how ever unlikely can allow a temporary current over load - very short in time but still there) this may or may not cause a problem

Look to this link for more information and a few “how it work pics”

PS the reason most big company use the regular ups is the cost of replacing the batteries as apposed to the chance their could be a problem
 

Disputant

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2002
Location
Chicago, IL
Stedeman said:
*In a "true ups" you will always run off the ups battery (an alternating square wave - very stable) and the ups will charges the batteries most of the time (this also means you replace the batteries more often)

In a "regular ups" you run off the line current (test and see - using a multi-meter in the ac socket watch the volts move up and down 10-20V) the ups will only kick in after you hit a thresh hold limit (it takes time to switch witch how ever unlikely can allow a temporary current over load - very short in time but still there) this may or may not cause a problem

Look to this link for more information and a few “how it work pics”

PS the reason most big company use the regular ups is the cost of replacing the batteries as apposed to the chance their could be a problem

While I agree with what you are saying, I think what the original poster would be interested in what is tried, proven, and cost effective. In other words, what power supplies are the best according to what you described and where are the best outlets to get them.

If there is a better one than the APC my company is supplying, I would be very interested in letting them know a better option.

EDIT: We don't skimp on battery costs, there are millions of dollars at stake on some of our servers, so better options are welcome, trust me. thx
 

Stedeman

The Half Asleep Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Location
Lewiston Maine
In an old house situation or where you see dimming of lights when the heat turns on a true ups would give you a much safer result but if the wiring is newer, then maybe a regular ups would be alright I lived in an old house and was given life¡¦s little lesson on the subject (there are cheaper ones out there for home use, but they are still 15-30% more than a regular ups)

Below is a comparison of $/V and IMHO that¡¦s why most companies will use a regular ups (remember most companies also have very good wiring and have many other forms of protection including redundant servers that a home owner doesn¡¦t have)

UPS-600A 600VA Desktop UPS+AVR w/Network inter- $ 251.00
face port. Built-in power center &
scaled LED indicators. For 386, 486
workstations, file servers.

ONL-600 600VA/500W On-line UPS with Network $ 629.00
interface port. Pure sinewave w/static
bypass switch on inverter fault or over-
load. System restartable w/o AC power.
For file servers and point-of-sale equip.


As for your company you would need a true cost analysis to determine if the cost of a true ups is better than taking the chance of your main and back up failing at the same time but, it might be worth mentioning to your higher ups if you have ever lost both at the same time (could get you a raise or bonus) if so don¡¦t forget me ;)
 

Stedeman

The Half Asleep Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Location
Lewiston Maine
as for "the best outlets to get them at" always find what’s best for you online (1-2weeks) or a local place cost more but you get it now if on line I would use pricwatch and streatprices to find the best deal (and know what your looking for too)
 

Myrdhinn

Registered
Joined
Jun 25, 2002
I may be wrong but I think by the term "true ups" are the ones iwth built in line conditoners... which are rather expensive. Non-line conditioned ups's will not regulate the current so it as constant as the unit can maintain. Another option is to buy a dedicated line conditioner. Tripplite makes them and are reasonably priced if you live in a place with a lot of dirty power, brownouts, etc.
 
OP
TheNewGuy

TheNewGuy

Registered
Joined
Oct 27, 2002
just to clarify things a bit, the flickering only happens when i turn a particular device(tv for example) on. once the device is on, everything seems normal. im just concerned that this initial flickering may, in some way, be damaging my electronic devices. Today, im going to try and find a retailer that sells UPS. I will also check online.
 

Stedeman

The Half Asleep Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2002
Location
Lewiston Maine
Myrdhinn said:
I may be wrong but I think by the term "true ups" are the ones iwth built in line conditoners... which are rather expensive. Non-line conditioned ups's will not regulate the current so it as constant as the unit can maintain. Another option is to buy a dedicated line conditioner. Tripplite makes them and are reasonably priced if you live in a place with a lot of dirty power, brownouts, etc.
see this link it has a full description