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Un-dusting!

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Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Find a friendly auto repair shop, they'll use their compressed air to blow it out for some cookies or a sixpack.
Make sure they don't spin the fans way up though, that'll kill 'em.

If you're blowing it out, hold the fan blades so they can't spin.
 

Ben333

Folding for Team 32!
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
My buddy W says I should just use a small air compressor, and hold it about a foot away, but i'm kinda worried about that damaging something.

Your buddy has the most cost effective idea, other members will also agree :thup: It wont damage anything, its just the air in your room being compressed and blown back onto your hardware.
 

Spawn-Inc

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
i use my air compressor at 25-40 psi i am careful around fans so i don't make them spin faster then they would normally run.
 

muddocktor

Retired
Joined
Nov 1, 2001
Location
New Iberia, LA
Yep, I use my air compressor too for cleaning out the old dust bunnies. I still keep a can or 2 of the canned air around for small, quick jobs like drying a cpu or heatsink after cleaning old tim off though as that's just easier than walking out to the garage and pressuring up the air compressor just for that.
 

MattNo5ss

5up3r m0d3r4t0r
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
I use a vacuum with a brush attachment, it seems to work pretty well. Plus, it doesn't blow the dust around just to land back on the components, the dust is sucked into the vacuum.
 

ezcharlie

Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2003
Location
Philippines
i have a vacuum that sucks and blows depending on where you connect the hoses.
at least this way you get a vacuum cleaner too not just an "air compressor".
more practical plus your mom/wife will be happy :)
 

vgta88

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
this is not a good idea, but at gas stations the tire pumping machine is a decent compressed blower. and its either free or 25cents. I've seen the air come out with moisture though, thats why it might not be a good idea unless the moisture is only temp.

I on the other hand use a vacuum with a thin nozzle but I find they never have enough suction for surface stuck dust. all the bunnies will fly though.

I don't know how the compressed air stuff in a can works but personally with all these dust bunnies, blowing them anywhere sounds like a dumb idea so it's never caught on for me.
 
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Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
The "air" in the canned air is actually R134a, the freon replacement.
Instead of being vaguely toxic and an ozone depleter, it's vaguely toxic and a greenhouse gas.
 

Ben333

Folding for Team 32!
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
The "air" in the canned air is actually R134a, the freon replacement.
Instead of being vaguely toxic and an ozone depleter, it's vaguely toxic and a greenhouse gas.

Wikipedia said:
Despite the name "canned air," the cans actually contain gases that are much easier to compress into liquids, such as difluoroethane, trifluoroethane, or tetrafluoroethane. Hydrocarbons, like butane, were often used in the past, but their flammability forced manufacturers to use fluorocarbons.
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
R134a is a fluorocarbon :D

It's also quite flammable, and may or may not burn to form nerve toxins (R12(freon) did).
 

Ben333

Folding for Team 32!
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
I don't think R134a is flammable, from my experience charging systems with it and brazing on them anyway.
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Try intentionally burning it, burns great. Not quite as fast as butane, but pretty quick.
Do it outside though.




EDIT:
Ok, survey says Ben333 is correct. If you can get it to burn, you won't like it:
Chemical hazards:
R134a vapours decompose when
exposed to high temperatures with the
formation of toxic and irritating compounds such
as hydrofluoric acid, carbon monoxide and
carbonyl fluoride.

But it is not flammable in normal atmospheric conditions.
That brings up the interesting point, what was in the bottle of "r134a" that i had that was so flammable?
The world may never know.
 
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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
An air compressor is most useful for this I believe. To keep the fans from spinning to fast and damaging the bearings just take a screwdriver or something and stop the blades while you are aiming the air jet at them. No need to turn the pressure down. I picked up a nice medium duty twin tank air compressor at Harbor Freight for under $100. You don't need a huge one like you would for running an impact wrench but you want to get one with enough capacity that it builds pressure quickly. That way you don't have to sit around waiting for ten minutes for it to pump back up after you use it for a few seconds. An air compressor comes in handy for so many things. It's like a pickup truck. Once you own one you can't do without one.
 

wickedout

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
I use my air compressor and compressed air via Costco. I clean out my rig like every month or so. It takes like 15 minutes or so. If I want a real nice cleaning I take it apart (my rig) and really clean it up. Haven't had to do that yet with my current system.

My case is dust magnet. It collects a lot of dust. I don't remember doing this much dusting with my old Lian Li case. This Antec case is a dust bunny. Lmao!
 

Mpegger

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
I'd be abit wary of using any type of shop air compressor. Most are designed to remove moisture (water) but still contain oil to keep the compressor and tool lubricated.

A compressor used for air brushing should be both moisture and oil free.

And yes, vacuums can create a very high amount of static electricity because of the constantly moving air, but if used properly and with caution, should not pose a problem. There are vacuums specifically designed just for useage on electronic parts.