• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Using a 16TB WD Gold mechanical hard drive with TLER on Desktop without RAID - downsides?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
RedProTLER.jpg

Well I knew I saw this somewhere...
So they are both TLER drives.

And WD doesn't even make WD Black in 16TB capacities.


I guess I am just reluctant to completely dismiss the MTBF figure being larger for Golds, and not by a little, 2.5 times is a lot.
What bases do they have to predict Gold will last that much longer than Red Pro...


And by the way EarthDog, we are not comparing Seagates because at this time, their pricing does not compare, they are much more expensive, so they do not compete with current WD sale. They are not worth it at this time.
 

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003

Can I trust the MTBF?​


Short answer: No


A hard drive’s MTBF, or mean time between failures, is an estimation of how long a hard drive will last. Some hard drive manufacturers advertise this figure as a way of showing how reliable a specific drive model is, which usually ranges between 1 million and 1.5 million hours.


A study by Carnegie Mellon University shows that MTBFs are greatly exaggerated. They suggest “a nominal annual failure rate of at most 0.88 percent.”

From: https://www.comparitech.com/blog/cloud-online-backup/how-long-do-hard-drives-last/
Post magically merged:

The 5 year warranty is perhaps the longest in the industry right now and is good enough for me. I could care less about the MTBF if they still cover it. Again, I use parity as a means to protet my data so I can survive a drive failure. To be clear, I can survive 1 drive failure at a time and no more than 1. After 5 years I'd be looking to change it out anyways. The longer you go the more risk you build. Your risk tollerance comes into play around 3-5 years.
Post magically merged:

With Unraid, I can keep track of SMART errors. When I start to see errors, I can look to see which drive I need to look into a replacement for. I do this type of check fairly regularly.
 

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
I don't think you made a bad choice. The more I look at it the less objection I see and my objection was never that great anyway. I think that you'll get a lot of good use from this drive and with a 512MB cache, it will back up smaller files very quickly. The 5-year warranty would keep me at ease for a long time too.

If you are relying on a single drive for your backup, then you inherit greater risk. When the drive starts to fail and if you don't catch is soon enough, then pulling that data *may* be hampered by the TLER function but this has always been a very focused argument and does not take into account the greater value of the drive itself. Keep an eye on SMART errors and be prepared for a different backup when they start to show and you may NEVER have an issue with or without TLER. Originally, I was thinking that the Red Pro did not have TLER but that was incorrect.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Yes.

My friendly counter point is that we are not trusting / looking at MTBF figure to mean 114 years.

We are looking at the MTBF figure to mean unknown value X whereby:
The same company, using the same test methods is officially claiming that one drive's figure is X and another drive's figure is 2.5X.

So whatever X is, the question is reduced to


IF

mtbf[Red Pro] = X

mtbf[Gold] = 2.5X


THEN mtbf[Gold] > mtbf[Red Pro]


Because if not, then the fundamental meaning behind MTBF is a lie.
It would be illegal.

They may have legal wiggle room to argue what X value is - but not legal wiggle room to lie that mtbf[Gold] > mtbf[Red Pro]
 

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
Of course it means something different but it may not correlate quite that simply. Again, I don't know. It could be a great shortcut to determin value but it may not. I catch a lot of grief on here when I say that 80+ certification = life in power supplies. My argument is that to get a higher 80+ certification means that you had to use higher quality parts and thus they could last longer. I know that 80+ doesn't mean that but I use it as a shortcut because... reasons.

MTBF might be the same way. It is a number that they can calculate and show as a difference but it's meaning may not actually be what we want it to be. I mean, 100 year or more MTBF? What can that really mean if we all know that no spinning drive will last anything near that time.

I get what you're saying about MTBF = x with "x" being some more realistic time frame and 2.5x must be better. I get it and that may be true. It also may not be true and I don't know.