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VIVO technology (Video-In Video-Out)

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Xenohitsu

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Sep 28, 2010
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U.S.
not to be confused with AVIVO video decoding, though somewhat related. I would like to figure out why this technology rarely became popularized, though I can guess why.
I'm particularly interested in the video-in aspect.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_In_Video_Out
This is supposedly enabled in video cards last seen in ones such as the ATI 4650 and the GeForce 9500t http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814129143
What made this so interesting is that, if the drivers were included, it allowed the video input of any VCR, Television or DVD player to go into the PC without any extra hardware (which I've never had luck with- those switchboxes that never seemed to work). I don't have use any VCRs or old dvd players with composite out, but what are some utilities that the video-in could have been used for? The only thing it didn't support was HDCP, but anything below that supposedly could be displayed by the computer. Rather than using HDTVs directly to display a DVD or VCR video, it seems to streamline and capture the footage to allow easy backups of various composite videos, from videocameras, etc.

"Some practical uses of VIVO include being able to display multimedia stored on a computer on a TV, and being able to connect a DVD player or video game console to a computer while continuing to allow viewing via a TV monitor. VIVO itself, however, can not decode broadcast signals from any source, and so, like HDTV sets without tuners and composite monitors, additional equipment is required to be able to show broadcast TV programs.

Some manufacturers enable their version of the VIVO port to also transfer sound."

I'm unsure what's meant by that, but what I'm interested in is being able to annotate or backup old footage by layering a window in Windows or Linux with a program that is ready to display the feed on the PC, which would then be displayed using a VGA/DVI/HDMI monitor (not that the quality will get better, but just so there aren't any extra obstacles faced after the PC is able to decode and output it. Also, I've used Firewire and other captures from high-end microscopes with software such as Axiovision, and view this as a similar application. The main interest I have is that any component out (yellow cable) from any device with video out can be used to feed into the PC to view in a cool window on the desktop while working on other things. Can someone help me find the right software, if it's not already included with those video cards being sold that I linked to? thanks!
 
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Xenohitsu

Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
U.S.
just saw this:

"Video Input/VIVO port

In the past, certain graphics card products provided purpose-built video input ports such as S-Video and composite video to cater to users with video input requirements. Contemporary graphics cards, however, must provide a complement of video output ports on small I/O panels of limited space. To avoid congestion, the mainstream practice is to integrate video input and output capabilities into a single port.

The ViVo port, as it’s known, is typically found on high-end products and takes on the form of a 9-pin S-Video port, used in conjunction with a ViVo adapter which can convert the ViVo port into several input and output ports, such as S-Video in, S-Video out, Composite video in, and Composite video out."
from http://www.newegg.com/product/CategoryIntelligenceArticle.aspx?articleId=186
 
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Xenohitsu

Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
U.S.
Actually, it looks like some of those S-video out cards don't feature VIVO. it has to have 9 pins, and may have been last seen in the 7900gtx, 4870, and x1900xts