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VMware 3.x.x Folding Guide (including -bigadv)

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ChasR

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2004
Location
Atlanta
Windows/VMware Player/Ubuntu
By ChasR 03 SEP 11
This guide includes:

VMware Player 3.1.4 Install. VMware/Ubuntu 10.10 SMP will give you a 15% boost in ppd over Windows SMP.

VMware Player 3.0.0 -bigadv install. Close to a 20% boost in PPD over Windows -bigadv.

Automating the VM. Not entirely necessary on a machine running 24/7, particularly if you use VMware's suspend feature when you have to reboot Windows.

Copying the VM. Saves a lot of time on the 2nd VM and subsequent ones.

VMware Player 3.1.4 and Ubuntu 10.10 x64 Desktop (NOT -bigadv)


1. Download VMware Player from here http://downloads.vmware.com/d/info/...ceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=vmware player download and get a serial number. If you have a machine with 8 physical or logical cpu cores, download Player version 3.0.0 from here http://downloads.vmware.com/d/details/player_3_0/ZGp0YmQlJSpiZGVkZA== Only VMware Player 3.0.0 supports 8 cpu cores. 3.0.0 Installation is very similar to 3.1.4, but I have included specific instructions in another section.


2. Download Ubuntu 10.10 64 bit PC (AMD64) desktop from here http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/
Make sure you enable virtulization/64bit in the bios.
At your option you may want to burn the ISO to a CD.

3. Install VMWare, nice and easy windows installer.

4. Start VMWare and create a new virtual machine (wizard).

5. Point VMware to the Linux image you downloaded or the CD you burned. The wizard will select Easy Install. Hit next.

6. Enter your name, user name password (This will be your Linux user name and password). Hit next.

7. Enter a name for your VM or accept the default. Enter a path to your VM or accept the default. Hit next.

8. Specify the disk capacity. Don't put less 5GB, or less than 6GB if you intend to upgrade Linux in the future. If you have the space, accept the default. Hit next. Small disk capacities default to small swap spaces. If you skimp on memory and disk capacity, you risk having the VM crash when it runs out of swap space.

9. Select Customize Hardware. Change the memory to 800 MB for regular SMP and 2200 MB for -bigadv. Select the correct number of physical processors. Change Network Adapter to Bridged and check the replicate physical network box. Select OK. Hit Finish. The VM will begin installation of the Ubuntu guest.

10. Download and install VMware tools when prompted.

11. The install will proceed.

12. Wait for the GUI to start and then log in. You now have a working Linux guest in the VM and can install FAH any way you want. For those who need FAH installation instructions, read on for a v6.34 guide using the GUI.

13. Open places (Home Folder in Ubuntu >10.10), right click in vacant space in the window and select create new folder, name the folder FAH.

14. Open Firefox and browse to here: http://folding.stanford.edu/English/Download . Download (save the file)v6.34 for Linux and BSD. It should be the first selection.

15. Using places (Files or Home Folder in > 10.10) browse to the Downloads folder. Right click on FAH6.34-Linux64.tgz, select open with archive manager, extract, and browse to the FAH folder you created earlier, save. Close all the open windows.

16. Browse to the FAH directory, right click on fah6, select Properties, permissions and check the allow executing file as a program box.

17. In System, Administration, select Update Manager and update. Don't upgrade to 11.04 as it will take forever. If you want to use 11.04 install it instead of 10.10. Creating another VM for 11.04 is faster than upgrading 10.10.

18. Browse to the FAH folder, right click on the folder, select sharing options, check the share this file. Samba will install. After Samba installs, restart your session, browse to the FAH folder, right click, sharing options and check the allow guest access and allow others to create and delete files box. Now you have the FAH folder shared on the network.

19. Hit Applications, Accessories, text editor. Type:
cd ~/FAH
./fah6 -configonly

Save the file to the desktop as FAH -configonly

Delete the -configonly from the file and save as FAH start.

20. Right click on both FAH icons on the desktop, properties, permissions, check the allow executing the file as a program box.

21. Double click on the FAH -configonly icon and configure FAH. Be sure to enter -smp and -verbosity 9 in the extra parameters of advanced configuration. Optionally you can add the flags to the shortcut.

22. Double click on FAH start and you're folding.




Automating the VM.
Follow these steps to run the VM and start FAH when you log into windows.

In the Ubuntu VM
1. System, Administration, Users and Groups, Password - change to Not asked on login

2. System, Administration, Login Screen - set to Login as you automatically

3. Applications, Accessories, Text editor - type:

cd ~/FAH
gnome-terminal -x ./fah6

Save the file as autofah in the FAH directory. Right click on the file, properties, permissions, check allow executing the file as a program.

4. System, Preferences, Startup Applications, Add - Name it FAH Start, browse to autofah and double click on it, comment [email protected], Save.

In Windows

5. Browse to the .vmx file in your Virtual machine directory.

6. Create a shortcut

7. Copy the shortcut

8. Start, right click on Startup (in XP you have to hit all programs) select open, paste the shortcut.

You're done. (provided I remembered everything). Now when you login to Windows, the shortcut will start the virtual machine, Ubuntu will start in the VM without any login required and FAH will start in a terminal Window.


Creating a copy of your VM so you don't have to do all the above on the next one.

So you want another VM, but don't want to go through the hassle of setting all this stuff up again. You can copy the VM and move the copy to another machine. You just have to change the hostname of the copied VM.

1. Shut down Ubuntu in the VM.

2. Close the VM.

3. Copy the VM to a new directory, something like Generic FAH VM.

4. Start VMware, Open a VM, browse to the .vmx file of the newly copied VM. VMware is going to ask if you moved or copied the VM. You must answer "I copied it".

5, If you automated FAH, close FAH. Go to the FAH directory and delete the Work directory, queue.dat, and machinedependent.dat.

6. SHutdown the VM.

7. Copy the generic FAH VM to the desired machine and start it up.

8. Open a terminal window and type gksu gedit /etc/hostname and change the hostname, save the file.

9. In the terminal window, type gksu gedit /etc/hosts and change all instances of the hostname to the same thing as in step 8.

10. Restart.




3.0.0 Install for -bigadv

1. If you have a machine with 8 physical or logical cpu cores, download Player version 3.0.0 from here http://downloads.vmware.com/d/details/player_3_0/ZGp0YmQlJSpiZGVkZA== Only VMware Player 3.0.0 supports 8 cpu cores.

2. Download Ubuntu 10.10 64 bit PC (AMD64) desktop from here http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/. Make sure you enable virtulization/64bit in the bios. At your option you may want to burn the ISO to a CD.

3. Install VMware

4. Start VMware Player and create a new virtual machine.

5. Point VMware to the Linux image you downloaded or the CD you burned. The wizard will select Easy Install. Hit next.

6. Enter your name, user name password (This will be your Linux user name and password). Hit next.

7. Enter a name for your VM or accept the default. Enter a path to your VM or accept the default. Hit next.

8. Specify the disk capacity. Don't put less 5GB, or less than 6GB if you intend to upgrade Linux in the future. If you have the space, accept the default. Hit next. Small disk capacities default to small swap spaces. If you skimp on memory and disk capacity, you risk having the VM crash when it runs out of swap space.

9. Select Customize Hardware. Change the memory to 2200 MB for -bigadv. Select 4 processor cores. Change Network Adapter to Bridged and check the replicate physical network box. Select OK. Hit Finish. The VM will begin installation of the Ubuntu guest.

10. Download and install VMware tools when prompted.

11. The install will proceed.

12. Wait for the GUI to start and then log in to confirm you have a working Ubuntu guest. You now have a working Linux guest in the VM and can install FAH any way you want.

13. Shutdown Ubuntu and close the VM.

For this part, I recommend you obtain a good text/HTML editor. I recommend NoteTab Light, but there are others that do the same thing.

14. In Windows, browse to the Virtual Machine directory and right click on the vmware configuration file (.vmx) and open with NoteTab.

15. Change numvcpus = "4" to numvcpus = "8" and add priority.ungrabbed = "idle" to the bottom of the file and save it.

You now have an 8 core VM to install FAH SMP -bigadv into. Follow the Instructions above and don't forget to add the -bigadv flag in extra paramaters.




ChasR
 
Last edited:

klear

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2002
Alright, got 2 bigadv VMs running. Things are looking up on my main 2600k, however my 2nd 2600k is only running on 7 cores as it is feeding an ATi card at the moment. My PPD using 7 cores on WinSMP was approx
Code:
 Min. Time / Frame : 00:37:02 - 31,233.5 PPD
 Avg. Time / Frame : 00:37:47 - 30,308.1 PPD

Using 7 cores on the VM on the same unit is looking down
Code:
 Min. Time / Frame : 00:39:58 - 27,858.8 PPD
 Avg. Time / Frame : 00:40:34 - 27,243.0 PPD
Does this make sense?
Should I try regular SMP on 7 cores in VM? or perhaps WinSMP is faster for just 7 cores bigadv?
 
OP
ChasR

ChasR

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2004
Location
Atlanta
What WU on the SMP instance. The GPU instance could have a significant effect on the smp production as well.
 
Last edited:
OP
ChasR

ChasR

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2004
Location
Atlanta
That's the slowest one.

2600K @ 4.6 without GPUs:

Project ID: 2684
Core: GRO-A5
Credit: 10235
Frames: 100


Name: ChasR Big VM
Path: \\CHASR-Desktop\fah\
Number of Frames Observed: 300

Min. Time / Frame : 00:29:49 - 43,234 PPD
Avg. Time / Frame : 00:31:30 - 39,815 PPD

That ATi would have to be putting out a bunch of ppd to make up for the loss on the SMP instance.
 

gabi_golan

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2011
Hello!
I'm running VM folding on one of my rigs, and i run it with VirtualBox instead of VMPlayer.
It runs with no problems, and the output for example is 13KPPD on project 7162, on i7 920 @3654, VM runs Ubuntu 64bit, inside Windows7 64bit.
Is there any reason I should switch from VirtualBox to VMPlayer (like if its significantly better, or gets much higher PPD), or should i stay with my current setup?
 

'Cuda340

Very Welcoming Senior, Premium Member #11
Joined
May 30, 2004
Location
[email protected]
Is there any reason I should switch from VirtualBox to VMPlayer (like if its significantly better, or gets much higher PPD), or should i stay with my current setup?

Unless your bored or have a lot of spare time on your hands, just stay with your current setup........