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water cooling with something else?

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Pumping Mercury would be a challenge. Not to mention that the safety code violation would be pretty horrendous.

Silver has an excellent thermal conductivity (406)
For comparison, Aluminum (205) and Copper (385)

Air, has a very poor thermal conductivity (.026)
Water, significantly better than air at (.6)

With regard to using other liquids...

You'll be hard pressed to find a liquid with better thermal properties than pure water.

Ammonia, doesn't interact well with Copper at all. If you want corrosion in your fancy copper block and radiator fill it with ammonia.

Chlorine Bleach? Is a strong electrolyte and isn't as thermally conductive as pure water.



Kingslayer (Jun 27, 2001 08:59 p.m.):
Ok, so we have Mercury which will kill you or make you insane.
Ammonia, which may be illegal and will kill you.
Pepsi, which will cause bubbles...(the smartass in me says use flat pepsi...duuhhhh)

What about common stuff. Let's say...hydraulic fliud. It's not a heavy as oil, can be pumped, and if I remember bleeds heat pretty well. If you don't believe me you've never set your arm on an actively working hydraulic resevior...

How about bleach...I dunno, im grasping at straws...

What about other thin oil based substances. There's a ton of them out there.

And what about the grandaddy of them all. Electrolytic Fluid. It's a non-conductive (electricity, don't know about heat though) fluid. Spring a leak and you don't have to worry. And I have seen a computer run completly submerged in this stuff. Drives were on the outside of course. But even the power supply was submerged.
 
Mercury is the liquid substance (at ambient temperature) with the best thermal conductivity. If it's handled with care its toxicity should not be an issue.
Regarding thermal conductivity Mercury rules!
Mercury 8.69 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
Ammonia 0.521 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
Water 0.599 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
But I'm worried about some factors:
1) Amalgam formation. Mercury forms amalgams when it gets in contact with some metals (gold, tin) I don't know if it forms amalgams with copper , aluminium or silver,.
2) Pumping. Mercury is heavy, the system would require a bigger pump than a watercooler.
3) Electrical conductivity. It's a metal, it conducts electricity much better than water.
4) Price? I don't know where to buy mercury and how much does it cost.

It's an interesting experiment, I'm going to find out how to solve this problems, I have already a 1/2HP pump and high pressure hoses. :)
 
I really think this is a *BAD* idea. As mentioned above, mercury is extremely toxic, and it's a cumulative poison that cannot be cured.

Ever hear the expression "mad as a hatter"? It comes from the fact that, in the old days, hat makers used mercury in their production process, and after a while the accumulated mercury in their brains drove them insane.

Also, there are very tough rules about disposal of mercury (because of groundwater contamination)--how'd you like your house to be a Super Fund site?
 
I will report you if you used a mercury cooler. It's just that simple.

The contamination effects of that much mercury would be pretty devastating if it got into the water supply.

Mr.L (Jun 28, 2001 11:23 a.m.):
Mercury is the liquid substance (at ambient temperature) with the best thermal conductivity. If it's handled with care its toxicity should not be an issue.
Regarding thermal conductivity Mercury rules!
Mercury 8.69 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
Ammonia 0.521 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
Water 0.599 W/m-C (at 20ºC)
But I'm worried about some factors:
1) Amalgam formation. Mercury forms amalgams when it gets in contact with some metals (gold, tin) I don't know if it forms amalgams with copper , aluminium or silver,.
2) Pumping. Mercury is heavy, the system would require a bigger pump than a watercooler.
3) Electrical conductivity. It's a metal, it conducts electricity much better than water.
4) Price? I don't know where to buy mercury and how much does it cost.

It's an interesting experiment, I'm going to find out how to solve this problems, I have already a 1/2HP pump and high pressure hoses. :)
 
mecury can infact get into your system if you hadle it with your bare hands but you'd have to handle it often for fairly long periods of time, also im pretty sure that its pretty dang expensive stuff, expensive enoght to make it not worth while, i think most of us are gonna probably stick with water for now lol it works better than air and if u want to go the xtra mile and get those temps really low just buy a peltier there not that expensive, and the seem to be the most practical solution.
 
Esoteric solutions aside (pun intended), distilled water with WaterWetter is about the best combo available. If you spill it (or have a reservoir failure or 2 like I had) it *will* make your desk stink like antifreeze. WaterWetter doesn't attack the clear tubing that is most common in our systems, but it IS hard on silicone sealer and neoprene tubing.
 
How about using Dot4 brake fluid? Brakes get perty hot and that brake fluid has to bleed alot of heat :)
Using the orange Dex-cool anti-freeze works slightly better than the old green anti-freeze.....looks different too :)
 
*spazzed* (Jun 29, 2001 02:07 a.m.):
How about using Dot4 brake fluid? Brakes get perty hot and that brake fluid has to bleed alot of heat :)
Using the orange Dex-cool anti-freeze works slightly better than the old green anti-freeze.....looks different too :)

DOT4 brake fluid is silicone based and doesnt break down under extreme tempature's but i dont know whate the rate of heat disapation is hydraulic oil on the other hand is a mineral oil base and ive heard that people submerge electrical components in it that operate under extreme temps
 
what would the effects be if you diluted artic silver and used that? by dilute i mean make it more of a liquid? probally not fesible but I am justa simple canadian eh ^_^
 
IAMCanadian (Jul 03, 2001 05:38 a.m.):
what would the effects be if you diluted artic silver and used that? by dilute i mean make it more of a liquid? probally not fesible but I am justa simple canadian eh ^_^

Don't worry, I'm part canadian too......he he
I'm not too sure on how that would work......but it'd make quite a bit of sludge in your waterblock, and that's not good
 
Richard999 (Jun 28, 2001 04:49 p.m.):
I will report you if you used a mercury cooler. It's just that simple.

The contamination effects of that much mercury would be pretty devastating if it got into the water supply.

The enviro-screwballs have contaminated the thought environment which is much more hazardous to a heathy brain then mercury could ever be.

Mercury has been used in tooth fillings for a century or more. Virtually everyone in the US has mercury embedded in their teeth for this reason. If it had any discernable health effect, there would be overwhelming statistics to prove it, and the lawyers would be making billions on it in class-action suits.

Natural gas has methyl mercaptan, a mercury compound, added to it to make it detectable by smell. Everyone who uses natural gas is emitting mercury into the air to be breathed by the entire world, and they have been doing it since at least the fifties. Again, no discernable health hazard.

Ordinary florescent lights contain mercury vapor which is released when they are broken and disposed of.

Mercury does occur naturally in the environment. After all, that is where we obtain the ores for all metals.

Handling miscellaneous mercury compounds can be hazardous, and handling mercury a lot can cause it to form traces of miscellaneous compounds.

As a coolant, mercury appears to be worthless compared to water because other properties besides thermal conductivity dominate. In a fluid, heat moves by the fluid itself moving, and this can be much faster than conduction, as shown by the water cooling of engines.

I'm not trying to be mean, but I can take only so much BS before I explode.
 
CalCoolage (Jul 03, 2001 10:51 a.m.):
(snip) Natural gas has methyl mercaptan, a mercury compound, added to it to make it detectableby smell. (snip)

Methyl mercaptan is actually methylthiol (CH3SH). It is called methylmercaptan because of its stench - organo-mercurary compounds are notoriously stinky as are organosulfur compounds. The body can detect ppb levels of methylthiol making it an excellent indicator for adding to odorless gasses such as natural gas.

Sigma-Aldrich Search for product 295515
 
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