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What always causes BSOD

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Niku-Sama

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2005
I had an interesting conversation today involving BSODs and i thought i'd survey the general population here and see what they say.

in general BSODs are caused by what?

i'll share what the conversation was about later on i just want some input first before i do.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
42...

...or 1/137

Why does the check engine come on? It could be a myriad of reasons, some of which are listed above. :)

Hardware failures/instabilty...software failures... I dont think there's a real answer here.
 

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
42. Phhhhtttttt.....

That's like asking: What's the meaning of life and everything?

You know, I really haven't seen a BSOD in a long time.
 
OP
Niku-Sama

Niku-Sama

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2005
i had several BSOD last night but it was because i forgot to juice up VDDP and SOC when i was trying to get a better speed out of my ram. I discovered pyprime last night and was trying to eek a few seconds out of my time.

any way thats kinda how the conversation got going it came up some how and they wanted to let me know that BSOD were only from memory trying to read at the same register twice or read and empy area. i didnt know what to say, as this was a pre screening thing with an employer and well i was up till 4 am melting for some reason and they called me pretty early in the morning.

i just kinda "huh" and stopped because it seemed strange and i couldnt tell if it was part of the screening or not. it kinda felt like not, and i've dealt with, more times than i can count, the i'm never wrong technical person and i couldnt tell if thats what i was dealing with there. frankly with less than 4 hours of sleep, an in depth conversation about it and overclocking was not something i was able to accomplish. but it really stuck with me today.

in case any one was wondering the initial question was how would you explain BSOD to the general public and if they were permanently damaging, system ending events.
My answer was; BSOD are brain farts for windows with error codes and that they are not permanent.

either way my answers were enough to get me a more formal interview, however, changes were made to the initial posting and sadly its not a livable wage
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
BSODs are uncorrectable errors. Correctable errors may cause problems but are not forcing the OS to stop/restart and often we can't see them (are corrected or the process rerun in the background). If there are no BSODs then it doesn't mean that the PC works without issues.

The most common are BSODs caused by RAM/IMC problems (incompatibility, or stability related to too low voltages). In the latest generations there are often BSODs caused by devices connected directly to the PCIe bus. This is often also related to motherboard design flaws. Sometimes there are a lot of registered errors that don't cause BSODs but the OS works slower and cause hiccups in games or other software.
 

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
BSODs are uncorrectable errors. Correctable errors may cause problems but are not forcing the OS to stop/restart and often we can't see them (are corrected or the process rerun in the background). If there are no BSODs then it doesn't mean that the PC works without issues.

The most common are BSODs caused by RAM/IMC problems (incompatibility, or stability related to too low voltages). In the latest generations there are often BSODs caused by devices connected directly to the PCIe bus. This is often also related to motherboard design flaws. Sometimes there are a lot of registered errors that don't cause BSODs but the OS works slower and cause hiccups in games or other software.
I hope you're right because I believe every word of it. Wow.
 

Woomack

Benching Team Leader
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
One tip. You can check corrected hardware errors in hwinfo64 at the bottom of the sensors table. It's reading Windows logs and shows errors. However, you probably won't see RAM errors there, as they often end on BSOD pretty quickly. PCIe errors and some others are listed there for sure as I had them on a stock/full auto settings when a graphics card had some stability issues.
 
OP
Niku-Sama

Niku-Sama

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2005
ok so still it can be caused by a bunch of different things.
i wasnt setting out to troll any one but it was something i wanted to run by some un affiliated peers in a sense.