• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

What are your Heat Removal Quantifier (HRQ) numbers

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Dr_Emmett_Brown

Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Location
Caprona
The HRQ formula is this:

formula.png

It is a way to quantify how much heat your cooling solution is removing under a particular load.

The larger the number, the higher the heat removal capacity.

Your system can remove more heat under one loading scenario than another. For example, in the winter, if your room is still a little chilly, the cooling solution won't have to work as hard since the room is "helping out." In the dead of summer, with all the windows closed, and no air circulating in your room, the cooling solution will have to work harder to remove heat because the room is contributing to the problem.

Likewise, higher wattage will add heat, and smaller die size means smaller water block or cold plates, which cannot remove as much heat as larger versions of the same are capable of doing.

This is a place to just post your numbers. There is a separate thread explaining this concept in detail. If you wish to find out more, or add your own commentary, please do it there rather than here.
LINK - https://www.overclockers.com/forums...of-Any-Cooling-Solution?p=8141144#post8141144

Cooling Solution
PolarBox 350 Thermosyphon Type A

Room Temperature
26.6 C

Avg Temp of all Cores
89.375 C

CPU Wattage
205

Die Size
174 mm squared

HRQ Number
18767
 
Last edited by a moderator:

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
6700k stock

Cooling Solution
Noctua D14

Room Temperature
22

Avg Temp of all Cores
56

CPU Wattage
90

Die Size
122

HRQ Number
21697





8086k delid+LM

Cooling Solution
Noctua D15 with single fan fitted

Room Temperature
22

Avg Temp of all Cores
50

CPU Wattage
90.4

Die Size
149

HRQ Number
21668





5930k stock

Cooling Solution
Dark Rock Pro 4

Room Temperature
22

Avg Temp of all Cores
59

CPU Wattage
140

Die Size
356

HRQ Number
10628


All above were allowed 5 mins to burn in before taking average readings. Stress was Prime95 128k FFT per real core. Fans are connected to mobo, which will control the fan speed as it sees fit.
 

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
[oldtable][/table]CPU|Cooling Solution|Room Temp|Ave CPU Temp All Cores|CPU Watts|Die Size|HRQ
3700x|Custom Loop|20|35|20.5|199|6,867
3700x|Custom Loop|20|67|95|199|10,157
3700x|Custom Loop|20|73|97|199|9,196[/table]

Based on these results which is the better cooler?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
3700X PBO

Cooling Solution
Noctua D15 Chromax

Room Temperature
20.5

Avg Temp of all Cores
84.5

CPU Wattage
138 (CPU socket)
113 (cores only)

Die Size
74 (CCD)
125 (IOD)
199 package total

HRQ Number
10835 (socket power, CCD+IOD area)
23860 (cores only, CCD area)

IOD temp unknown. There is a discrepancy between PPT (socket power), core power, and SoC power that I've never understood. Core + Soc < PPT.
 

mackerel

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
3700X stock

Cooling Solution
Noctua D15 Chromax

Room Temperature
21

Avg Temp of all Cores
63

CPU Wattage
69 (CPU socket)
87 (cores only)

Die Size
74 (CCD)
125 (IOD)
199 package total

HRQ Number
10409 (socket power, CCD+IOD area)
22200 (cores only, CCD area)

Very similar to previous run on same system with PBO on, so at least that seems consistent.
 
OP
Dr_Emmett_Brown

Dr_Emmett_Brown

Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Location
Caprona
[oldtable]CPU|Cooling Solution|Room Temp|Ave CPU Temp All Cores|CPU Watts|Die Size|HRQ
3700x|Custom Loop|20|35|20.5|199|6,867
3700x|Custom Loop|20|67|95|199|10,157
3700x|Custom Loop|20|73|97|199|9,196[/table]

Based on these results which is the better cooler?

The one whose HRQ number has a comma in it.


3700X PBO

Cooling Solution
Noctua D15 Chromax

Room Temperature
20.5

Avg Temp of all Cores
84.5

CPU Wattage
138 (CPU socket)
113 (cores only)

Die Size
74 (CCD)
125 (IOD)
199 package total

Thanks for the numbers mackerel.

Now it brings up an interesting side topic. Which number to use for the power draw and how granular should the die size be calculated?

If we were talking about the Thermodynamic concept of Heat Transfer, we only consider the heat generation portions. But since we are dealing with Heat Removal, we are constrained to the size of the actual contact block, which is, for all intents and purposes, the size of the die itself.

Thanks again for your contribution(s) mackerel.
 
Last edited:
OP
Dr_Emmett_Brown

Dr_Emmett_Brown

Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Location
Caprona
All three of my posts are ... just different power states and a little time for some heat soak.

I know.

And as was stated many, many times, different numbers will occur under different heat loads and circumstances.

The number describes how hard the heat removal system is working at any instant in time.

At 35C and 20.5W the score of 6,867 indicates the system is not working too hard. Tough to argue with that.

Notice you didn't get a "big score" for a low temperature in the above scenario.

And maybe not so surprising at 67C under a 95W load the score of 10,157 indicates it is working harder than 73C under a 97W load with a score of 9,196.

Do you understand now?

Cooler is better, but the higher temp had a higher wattage draw too, so how can you know when the system is doing more cooling work?

The equation provides the answer.
 
Last edited:

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
The issue is exactly as I stated in the other thread. The longer the heat is being generated the lower your HRQ will go until you reach a saturation point then it will normalize.

I understand this is just a snapshot of efficiency but this snapshot is bunk unless you wait until the saturation point. Otherwise you will get results all over the board and the results will be void.
 

Zerileous

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2002
Component: 2600X
Prime95 Small FFT
Cooling Solution: Custom Watercooling Loop (in sig)
Tdie 80.0c
PPT 108.3W
Ambient 25.0c
Loop 33.3c
Die 213 mm²

HRQ 9,245


Component: Vega64
Load: Folding at Home
Cooling Solution: Custom Watercooling Loop (in sig)
GPU Temp 37c
Hot Spot 59c
wattage 197W
Ambient 25.3c
Loop 32.7c
Die 495 mm²

Hot Spot HRQ 11,809
GPU HRQ 34,015
 
OP
Dr_Emmett_Brown

Dr_Emmett_Brown

Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Location
Caprona
The issue is exactly as I stated in the other thread. The longer the heat is being generated the lower your HRQ will go until you reach a saturation point then it will normalize.

I understand this is just a snapshot of efficiency but this snapshot is bunk unless you wait until the saturation point. Otherwise you will get results all over the board and the results will be void.

But you want varying results for different conditions. That is the whole point!

You are still thinking about the "High Score" mentality, and this is not the correct intended use of the formula.

Your statement is like saying you're going to close your eyes after pressing the gas pedal in your car until a passenger tells you that you're at your car's max speed.

Some of the stuff you'll miss with your eyes closed is pretty important.

By the way, here is a link to an Excel File that automatically computes your HRQ number.

https://www9.zippyshare.com/v/2fg8X48I/file.html

Hosted by "ZippyShare" because I could not find a way to upload an Excel File here.

View attachment 210005
 
Last edited:

Aleslammer

Registered
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Playing a little bit.
Rysen 3800X / 4.5 / 1.45v
Koolance Chiller, fluid and water block
HWMonitor
X265 Benchmark / 4K / Realtime
Used mackerel's 199 for die size

Fluid Temp / Package watts / Package Temp / Room temp / Score

15c / 168.63 / 80c / 26.8c / 15928
10c / 167.04 / 74c / 26.6c / 17709
5c / 162.32 / 70c / 26.7c / 18838
0c / 159.65 / 59c / 27.1c / 25149
-4c / 157.34 / 53c / 26.6c / 29949

Couldn't hold -5 with this cpu, might just need a good cleaning or a recharge or the bugger is just hot, never ran into this before. Room is a little warm. Only ran through the numbers once.

Added:
If you substitute fluid temps for room temp.
15c = 13037
0c = 13598
 
Last edited: