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What do you replace the card or the router?

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FlyingTexan

Registered
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
So here's the deal I have a HTPC that isn't getting anywhere near what it should on my network. It's about 20ft from the cable modem/router and hitting 65mbps on a 400mbps line. My MacBook Pro sitting in the same spot and doing a speed test to the same server gets 320mbps. So there's obviously an issue with the HTPC. The HTPC has an ASRock mini-itx board that came with it's own wifi that's an Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3160. I've updated the bios and all drivers through ASRock for everything.

I'm using NetSpot software and seeing the signal strength isn't the best on the 5ghz scale. I don't really get why since it isn't that far and there's no walls or anything in the way. Anyway I'm on a 400mbit plan with Comcast and currently using the ARRIS SBG6900-AC which says it's AC1900, DOCsis 3.0 with speeds up to 686 mbps.

I really can't figure out why the 2017 MacBook Pro hits 320mbps in the same location as the desktop getting 65mbps running a speed test to the same server. My iPhone X was basically right there around the desktop.


So how does it exactly work does a stronger router make a better difference or do I need to get a USB-AC wifi card that's pretty monster and keep the current router? Also I have a spare Linksys EA6350 that's a couple years old but it's a wireless AC1200+ Router. If there's some way to connect the HTPC to that with ethernet and use the router as a antenna for the HTPC would that be the best setup or would it cut the networking in half?
 

Janus67

Benching Team Leader
Joined
May 29, 2005
What are you using to speed test?

If you wire them together do the speeds increase?

I would say that the router is not at fault if you are getting approrpiate speeds from other devices.
 
OP
F

FlyingTexan

Registered
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
i connected all three devices to the same server on speedtest.net. Of the three the Macbook Pro was 320mbs, iphone x around 65, desktop at like 60. Then I did the same thing on fast.com (netflix) and was 280, 80, 65 respectively. I then walked over and put the iphone x and macbook pro next to the router and reran the test with the same results.

So in the same exact location the macbook gets 320 while the htpc hits 65. I'm not able to wire them together due to location but since the macbook gets 320mbit on a 400mbit connection that already tells me the bandwidth is there. Netspot is showing my connection strength at 45% on the 5.0ghz. So I'm thinking I need to get that way up there. Do I get a new cable modem/router with stronger strength, get a USB wifi adapter for the HTPC that's pretty beefy, or somehow connect my older AC router via ethernet to the back of the HTPC and use it as basically a very large antenna (if possible I don't know how)?

- - - Auto-Merged Double Post - - -

Which of these would pump up the throughput to the HTPC better?


Router/cable modem:
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/netgea...3-1-cable-modem-black/6106000.p?skuId=6106000

Router
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/reviews/asus-ac5300-tri-band-ac-gigabit-router-black/5008900

USB wifi adapter
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/netgea...usb-3-0-adapter-black/6059000.p?skuId=6059000



Any ideas?

EDIT AGAIN***

I'm actually looking at youtube on mesh wifi. Could I just plug my HTPC into one and basically have it as the wifi card?
 
Last edited:

don256us

Uber Folding Senior
Joined
Jul 17, 2003
I'm scratching my head on this one.

A theory that I'm toying with right now has to do with signal attenuation. In this case, it could be caused by the direction of the antenna. If the router is sending signal waves going up and down versus your HTPC sending waves right and left, you will have a drop in speed. Turn either the router or the PC on its side and see what happens. Not both units, just one.

It's a cheap test and if nothing comes of it we know that isn't it.

I join Janus in running a patch cable from the HTPC to the router and see what happens.
 

Railgun

Member
Joined
May 7, 2011
Without knowing how the Intel NIC is connecting, it’s all a swag. Is it actually connecting at 80mhz or 40?

I’d stay away from mesh if you can help it. Also stay away from usb WiFi anything. Can you not get a proper wireless nic? You suggest no, but is a longer run around the room possible..., being only 20 feet away.

I blame the Intel NIC in this instance, but without knowing more details, no one will be able to tell you why.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I have had great results with some USB adapters but the results can vary tremendously from one USB adapter to another, depending on WIFI chip and drivers. Poorly written drivers are often an issue. Interference from poor shielding of components inside the case (e.g., PSU ) and in the immediate area can also be detrimental.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
A theory that I'm toying with right now has to do with signal attenuation. In this case, it could be caused by the direction of the antenna. If the router is sending signal waves going up and down versus your HTPC sending waves right and left, you will have a drop in speed. Turn either the router or the PC on its side and see what happens. Not both units, just one.

Another thing to try is re-orienting the PC itself, if the NIC is behind the case in relation to the router, now you have a giant metal block between the two. Same thing, just a thought.

And what antennas came with the board? I'm currently running a 7265 in a PCIe adapter that came with an external antenna with some coax so it can be moved around for the best signal and it works well. But seen a lot of the motherboard-integrated cards come with the smaller antennas that just hang off the back of the back of the board.