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what do you think of this temporary case mod?

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kaitlin4599

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
ok so as most of you know i was given a free 4U server case to use for my pc build. it didnt come with a lid/top so i decided to make my own. keep in mind this mod is only a temporary mod. in about 2 weeks i will be buying a proper micro ATX CASE. what i want to know is assuming i put some 80mm case fans in here to help exhaust the heat will this mod work or will it just cause a heat buildup? this mod is still a work in progress but should be finished tonight, also i used velcro to fix the board to the side panels. that way if i need to access the inside of the case i can just un velcro the lid off. if u have any suggestions about ways to improve this mod or any comments or concerns about heat buildup let me know i have 2 case fans plus my psu has a 120mm fan in it also my cpu cooler has 2 120mm fans lastly below are pictures showing the mod thanks

edit i dont feel comfy running the case with the top cover left off due to dust buildup

phpUyo5HZPM.jpg phpYmvFoQPM.jpg
 

InfoSponge16

Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Looks like it will help keep the dust out. It might be a good idea to get it off of the floor if you can.

You can also try running it to see if it gets hot, if it does and you have the fans then it may help to install them. If you don't already have them I wouldn't bother buying any 80's

Just run it without a cover to keep it cool until you get another case.

Or maybe you could try turning it into an olpen air setup, like a test bench. But it wouldn't be any good on the floor.

Is it possible to take everything out, invert the case, mount the mb to the outside using preexisting mb mount locations?
 
OP
K

kaitlin4599

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Looks like it will help keep the dust out. It might be a good idea to get it off of the floor if you can.

You can also try running it to see if it gets hot, if it does and you have the fans then it may help to install them. If you don't already have them I wouldn't bother buying any 80's

Just run it without a cover to keep it cool until you get another case.

Or maybe you could try turning it into an olpen air setup, like a test bench. But it wouldn't be any good on the floor.

Is it possible to take everything out, invert the case, mount the mb to the outside using preexisting mb mount locations?


the reason the case is on the floor is so i can work on it its not ready to be turned on but when it is ready it will be elevated off the floor
 

InfoSponge16

Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Oh I see. Well you might try a test run to see what it does. Then if it needs more cooling it wouldn't be a bad idea.

But it may be more work than its worth if your just gonna migrate the components. Unless you just want to get the modding experience, more cooling is better than less as long as it's not getting too noisy. If the 120 from the psu is the only thing working for exhaust then it would be a good idea to get some cooling in it.

If you want to get an idea of a test bench setup, check YouTube for JaysTwoCents, he has a pc he uses for testing that's the open air test bench setup.
It's the one with purple liquid cooling.
 
OP
K

kaitlin4599

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Oh I see. Well you might try a test run to see what it does. Then if it needs more cooling it wouldn't be a bad idea.

But it may be more work than its worth if your just gonna migrate the components. Unless you just want to get the modding experience, more cooling is better than less as long as it's not getting too noisy. If the 120 from the psu is the only thing working for exhaust then it would be a good idea to get some cooling in it.

If you want to get an idea of a test bench setup, check YouTube for JaysTwoCents, he has a pc he uses for testing that's the open air test bench setup.
It's the one with purple liquid cooling.

thanks i downloaded the programs real temp and hardware monitor i will add some fans and check out the temps in the bios how long do you think i should run the pc for to determine if the heat is an issue for this setup
 

Blaylock

"That Backfired" Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
Go Blue!
I wouldn't worry about dust build-up over a two week period unless you live in El Paso and are running out back in the barn.
 

InfoSponge16

Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Many people run their computers for long periods of time to ensure their PCs are stable at given settings. It includes monitoring temperatures.

If your really worried you can monitor in your bios for a little while. If you are ok there you can boot windows and use those monitoring programs you downloaded.

Under normal loads you'll probably be completely fine. It's under heavy loads and extended durations that heat can be a problem assuming everything is assembled correctly.

There are various programs that can be used to put your computer under an artificial load.

Programs that target the cpu, or programs that target the gpu. Some can tax both. They can tax your system much harder than everyday tasks including gaming. So stable under a stress test should be stable for normal usage.

So the question as to time really depends on the program. But if your unsure just monitor it and start short.

Start at 5 min load, then 10, then 20 ect until you feel comfortable that it's not going to overheat. Many articles when reviewing a component stress test a component for 10-20 minutes to get an idea of ita max operating temp.

Those that are running longer, 2 hours and up are usually pushing core clocks.
Hence the reason I said you should be completely fine.

It sounds as though you have a strong cpu cooler already. If your system were very restricted in air flow heat buildup could become a problem.

But the 120 in your psu can move alot of volume generally, though it's a good idea to remove heat elsewhere other than just the psu.