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What do your Regor X2 temperatures look like?

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Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
I'm trying to figure out if the sensors are just screwy, or if there might be a genuine problem here. The below pic is from Everest, but Speedfan shows similar results, and that's under full load on the machine in my sig.

I'm very much inclined to say the Core#1/#2 readings are the more accurate ones, since the heatsink doesn't feel particularly warm, but I just can't overlook that 55C number for the CPU...

So, I'm hoping for some reassurance here... has anyone else noticed oddities in the temperature readings on their Athlon II X2 chips?

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Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
The "CPU" sensor is of dubious accuracy at best, it should be within 10*c of the actual core temp sensors, if it isn't it's out to lunch.

I wouldn't worry about it.
 

e6600

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Location
Los Angeles
whats your ambient temps?
some of those temps look weird to me, like the hard drive temps and the motherboard temps

i actually spent 20 mins looking for this pic LOL
ocz2.png

at this time i had an ultra kaze 2k rpm on a sunbeam ccf, and i had some pretty good airflow on my cm690.. im guessing ambients were around 75f but i really have no idea
 

CharlieCS

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Pretty certain that is you motherboard sensor , which are unreliable,i wouldn't worry .On my current mobo it fluctuates between 77 and 79 C on my previous one it was stuck at 40 C .
 
OP
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Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
whats your ambient temps?
some of those temps look weird to me, like the hard drive temps and the motherboard temps

Ambient is about 78F. And the motherboard and hard drive temps are actually the ones I'm most inclined to believe... the northbridge only has a chintzy passive cooler on it, and the two hard drives with the higher temperatures are stuck close together in a cage, while the other two are placed in a different spot with more airflow.

One other thing that concerns me is the voltage. I got the same voltage as you... 1.47 or 1.49 depending on what's reading it. The problem is, that's the stock voltage the motherboard sets, despite the fact that the BIOS acknowledges the VID to be 1.375V. I manually lowered it, down to 1.4V for my picture and down to 1.33V now, but I really shouldn't have to do that.
 

QuietIce

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May 7, 2006
Location
Anywhere but there
Ambient is about 78F. And the motherboard and hard drive temps are actually the ones I'm most inclined to believe... the northbridge only has a chintzy passive cooler on it, and the two hard drives with the higher temperatures are stuck close together in a cage, while the other two are placed in a different spot with more airflow.
This is an mATX board, isn't it? It was never designed with OC'ing in mind and the NB temp shown is well within operating range. Most AMD chipsets run ~40-45°C and, considering your added ambient, your temp isn't much above normal. That cooler isn't bad at all. Unlike Intel chipsets, AMD chipsets don't need active cooling and, in fact, I am unaware of any on the market at this time. Even the high-end boards have passive chipset cooling.

One other thing that concerns me is the voltage. I got the same voltage as you... 1.47 or 1.49 depending on what's reading it. The problem is, that's the stock voltage the motherboard sets, despite the fact that the BIOS acknowledges the VID to be 1.375V. I manually lowered it, down to 1.4V for my picture and down to 1.33V now, but I really shouldn't have to do that.
Without sounding too harsh, you get what you pay for. One of the ways motherboard manufacturers reduce costs is with lower quality components. To avoid getting the vCore too low many BIOS are set to provide higher than normal voltages to make up for the possibility of lower than normal power being delivered from a less-than-perfect motherboard power system ... :shrug:
 

A15G

Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2008
In my bios of my II 240 it says 31'C. On windows, around 28'c, not sure if they are right. But when I do touch the heatsink it's just barely warm. When I game, it hits 38-40 at the most and it runs a little more warm but not warm enough to be considered hot. on stock HSF also.
 
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Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
Without sounding too harsh, you get what you pay for.

Right, and that's exactly why I bought the higher-end 780G board from Gigabyte rather than some random ECS thing. While I hold no designs of this being the greatest board ever, I would expect its quality to at least be on par with every other $120 Gigabyte board, which seem to be the darlings of the enthusiast market, and this board is certainly marketed with all the same features as the other Gigabyte boards. The size of the PCB has nothing to do with it... discounting it just because it's mATX is rather ignorant.

You also seem to have completely misunderstood what I was saying about the northbridge cooler. I never said that it was inadequate for the task. I was simply pointing out that the reported temperatures are in line with that type of heatsink. And a small passive aluminum heatsink is definitely what I would call 'chintzy'.

Anyhow, back to the issue at hand... I ran across a new beta BIOS from September, which is supposed to update some stuff relating to AM3 CPUs. The BIOS I currently have is supposed to support this chip, but maybe there were some more bugs that needed to be worked out. It can't hurt to try, I guess.
 

QuietIce

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Anywhere but there
If it cost that much someone at Gigabyte ought to be shot.
It's not ignorance, it's experience. I've seen very few mATX boards that were built with (what I'd call) proper cooling and voltage control. There are some but they're few and far between.


But I do agree with others here - no motherboard sensor can be trusted. I hope the new BIOS works out ... :)
 
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Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Some mobos overvolt just for the hell of it, the Asus M4A78T-E i use sometimes does, the power regulation is very stable, but higher then what i set it at. I take it into account when i set vcore in bios just like i take vdrop into account on Intel systems.
As long as it's always + a certain amount, it doesn't really matter that much.
Some AMD chipset heatsinks are chinsier then others, the GX heatsinks are quite large to keep the integrated GPU cool.
 
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Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
Well, the new BIOS didn't fix anything.

And I can manually set the voltage and it stays perfectly stable. I mean, the thing has a pretty good VRM section on it, and there are plenty of options for adjusting whatever voltages you want. So that's not an issue.

The problem is that I just want it to set it right in the first place. I'm not overclocking or anything, so I really don't want to have to screw with voltages.

I could understand if there was a slight overvoltage... like Bobnova said, some mobos do that to a certain extent. But even they usually get it in the ballpark; .1V is excessive no matter how I look at it, especially when it results in feeding close to 1.5V through a 45nm chip.

I've contacted Gigabyte support, gonna wait and see what they have to say about it.
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
AMD 45nm is fine with 1.5v, it's much more voltage tolerant then Intel 45nm (but requires more voltage then Intels).