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What equipment should I buy to connect over a hundred WiFi devices?

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Yes, it was a setting in the Dream Machine router and not the Ubiquity APs. I'm not the one on the team who made this adjustment but the guy who did told me it was a setting he found in the Dream Machine Pro or at least accessed through the Dream Machine Pro. I can't say for sure but I kind of doubt you will have this setting in a non Ubiquity router. The Dream Machine Pro allows for a lot of fine tuning of the other Ubiquity network components.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Aha.
Well I tried the simpler route. I did find out the hard way that it is sometimes necessary to reboot the Ubiquiti.

I have 8 (eight) Google Audio Chromecast casting simultaneously and fully in sync, so I was in a unique position to confirm that yes, periodically, without touching the modem, or router, simply CABLE OUT of Ubiquiti, then CABLE back IN, to reboot - gets all stuttering fixed.


I also found this out the hard way and am sharing with you:

Do not reset everything at the same time.
If the power is cut to everything and restored to everything at once, it may not come back online.
So you need to power ON the cable company router first, there is a decent wait for all the lights to correctly come on. Then do the router, wait for it to get all lit, and only now re-power up Ubiquiti.
Meaning, after both modem and router having finished their respective boot sequences.
Do not power it all ON at the same time.



The reach alone of this thing is worth not even looking at anything else, although for educational purposes, since we are clearly dealing with this model being in a league of its own, I still wonder which other specific models are its direct competitors, since it's clear that anything any retail store sells cannot compete.



On another topic...

As we know, Google has ceased production of Google Audio Chromecasts - wonderful pieces of technology, allowing all receivers WITHOUT HDMI - many millions of them in the United Sates alone, to play music which is cast to them, through RCA connections, no HDMI needed, every receiver ever made works with Google Audio [not video, they are HDMI-only] Chromecasts.
Well Google stopped making them, driving their prices up stratospherically.

Do you know who noticed? China.
China is selling Audio Chromecast clones now!! For under fifty bucks.
Still expensive but not unaffordable.

You can cast anything to any receiver, without ever having to replace old 2 channel receivers.
I just got a 100W Yamaha 2 channel Receiver at Good Will for under $15.
Google Audio Chromecasts blast 100 Watts of power through this receiver.
UNCOMPRESSED wave and flac files, Pandora, Spotify, everything at highest quality of uncompressed two channel sound through Google Audio Chromecasts.

Actually Audio Chromecasts do both RCA *and* Optical TOSLINK fiber, so technically more than two channels are also possible on Audio Chromecasts, no HDMI needed.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Thanks for sharing your experience with the network reboot. For those who haven't tried such a thing, that's good info to have. That said, I've always let things come up one at time. Start with the modem... then once it makes a connection, turn on the switches/router(s) and then end devices where possible. Now, everything comes up nice after a power outage (where I don't have control of what order my devices come up) in MOST cases, but yeah, I always do one at a time when in control of the process.

If you're buying/still own 2ch receivers (read one without HDMI and that old/cheap) and want to do half-way modern things...you'll have to jump through some hoops to make it happen. If you don't want a Chinese knock-off/have an HDMI version already/HDMI only thing you can get, there are HDMI to RCA adapters as well.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
If you're buying/still own 2ch receivers (read one without HDMI and that old/cheap) and want to do half-way modern things...you'll have to jump through some hoops to make it happen. If you don't want a Chinese knock-off/have an HDMI version already/HDMI only thing you can get, there are HDMI to RCA adapters as well.
Yes, 2 channel receivers are all that's necessary for playing outside speakers, patio speakers, speakers in rooms with no TV. No need for more than 2 channels.

Note that HDMI to RCA adapters introduce sync problems, as do other things, even using audio splitters introduces sync issues, headaches which need unacceptable amount of time to tend to.

So no, Google Audio Chromecast is the only device I am aware of, which offers flawless group syncing regardless of whether the group includes a receiver from 1970s or one made half a century later, in 2022. Everything. All in sync. Everywhere.


I started thinking about the concept of the actual reboot. What does it actually do, and why does it work at fixing stuttering problems?

So I came up with this solution I just typed up:


Google Audio Chromecast Group Streaming Fix
=====================================

If possible, STOP CASTING stuttering Chromecast group streaming.

Google Home > TAP on 'Play music' under that Group name

[This will CLEAR all group device buffers and begin playback of Google music on all of them.]

As soon as it starts, you may now PAUSE IT, then go back to your music app and start playing a different song before group casting again. Make sure it's a new song before group casting again.



So it seems to me that clearing the buffer is therefore accomplished in this way, just like it would be with a Ubiquiti reboot.
So this brings us back to Ubiquiti reboot perhaps being unnecessary.
I will know for sure in a month or two, as testing continues.

I just edited this to emphasize to make sure it's a new song before group casting again.
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Yes, 2 channel receivers are all that's necessary for playing outside speakers, patio speakers, speakers in rooms with no TV. No need for more than 2 channels.

Note that HDMI to RCA adapters introduce sync problems, as do other things, even using audio splitters introduces sync issues, headaches which need unacceptable amount of time to tend to.

So no, Google Audio Chromecast is the only device I am aware of, which offers flawless group syncing regardless of whether the group includes a receiver from 1970s or one made half a century later, in 2022. Everything. All in sync. Everywhere.
Ahh, I didn't know you tried before (did you, or are you guessing?)...good to know (de-sync)! Or needed it to sync across multiple devices. Still, it's a solution for those who aren't trying to pump Chromecast audio to multiple different sources or one who does and doesn't care about syncing them.

The underlying point of mine, however, was a lack of a necessary input on the receiver (age/cheap/both), not the number of channels. There are modern 2ch receivers with HDMI of course. :)
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
I have two receivers one on top of each other, I use two Audio Chromecasts for each because I found out the hard way that even using a simple audio splitter prevents Audio Chromecast from correctly syncing itself. It's a beautiful piece of technology, it synchronizes itself, as long as the line out is clean and uninterrupted. No splitters.

So I have used a splitter to find this out the hard way, but have not used an HDMI adapter. It is an assumption that if a simple audio splitter messes with sync pings, then other adapters will mess with to too.

My underlying point is that HDMI is great for video, but for audio-only... HDMI limits what you can do because of the sheer volume of audio devices without HDMI.
This world needs a non-HDMI Chromecast!

Through theft of intellectual property, China has now provided us with the perfect solution.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I think it all goes back to doing the right thing for the job. When you get into workarounds to save money, things can get a bit convoluted. Why not spend a bit more for a 2ch receiver with HDMI? At this point in my life, I'd rather pay more for the right thing than spend time (a finite resource, you can make more money) rigging things to work (and almost spending the same as buying a cheapO 2ch receiver with HDMI). There are many ways to skin a cat...to each their own, of course. :)

It is an assumption that if a simple audio splitter messes with sync pings, then other adapters will mess with to too.
I mean, you know assuming does... makes an ***(out of)U(and)ME. :p

HDMI limits what you can do because of the sheer volume of audio devices without HDMI.
I suppose that's a point. Though I can't think of any receivers made in the last decade or so that doesn't include an HDMI port... and I'm hanging onto a receiver that doesn't have one, lol (it was a $400 receiver 20 years ago). That said, I've never been limited by my receiver's lack of HDMI input. I wasn't 20 years ago when I bought it new, and not today. It has optical out and my audio (when I had cable) ran through that as well. Currently, I use Amazon Firestick (to TV via HDMI) and optical from the TV to the receiver. When I upgrade the TV and audio really soon (receiver going away replaced by a sound bar/sub/sat combo), it will all be HDMI. :)

HDMI ARC FTW... this is a good read for ya!

..in short, HDMI ARC and eARC should take care of any audio sync issues... should. There are adjustments you can make on the receiver as far as timing goes.

Apologies as that's a bit OT for what you're doing, but, useful information for everyone. :)
 
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OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
I will gladly address the 'why not spend more' question. HDMI receiver is considerably more expensive than the $15 100 watts each channel at 8 ohms Yamaha I got this month at Good Will to add to seven receivers I am using, for which I paid $20 each since they have no HDMI. So we are talking $150 range for eight receivers.

One HDMI receiver costs how much?
Surely a four digit figure for eight of them in 2022? So ten to twenty times the cost of what I paid for non HDMI powerful receivers. One of my $20 receivers is a Denon at 120 watts at eight ohms.

No no. Paying a grand or two or three for eight HDMI recovers through which no video runs? Not a smart move.

Thanks to China, Audio Chromecasts are now under $50 but I paid way less for them and was just interested in getting replacements for my Audio Chromecast reserve in case something happens to the ones I have.


As for HDMI receivers, I was, in fact, one of the few lucky ones on this very day, today, who bought a brand new Onkyo TX-NR6050 for $499 from Costco online. They sold in minutes today, since plenty of smart people around the country know there is no difference to speak of in 2022, between the $499 Costco-only Onkyo TX-NR6050 and the $800 everywhere else Onkyo TXNR6100.


Fully functioning HDMI 2.1, unlike the Yamaha defective HDMI 2. 1 board fiasco.

Onkyo TX-NR6050 is surely the one to get in 2022's HDMI 2.1 market for 7. 2 speakers. It's getting hooked up to my LG OLED, best TV technology still in 2022.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
One HDMI receiver costs how much? Surely a four digit figure for eight of them in 2022?
A quick trip to ebay is all over the place... from $30 on up. Hell, on the first page I found a $70 (costs as much as your a receiver + knock off chromecasts) 5.1ch HDMI receiver. I can imagine you get a less than $70 receiver with HDMI locally too. They aren't unicorns if people are selling them on ebay for less than that and free shipping, ya know? ;)


Anyhoo, great find on the Onyko. As cool as that is, I can't wait to get rid of my receiver and that furniture! My next system will be separates once again. :)
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Hell, on the first page...

Speaking of making a Front Page deal...

I would not buy this Yamaha though, Yamaha TSR-700 [rebadged Yamaha RX-V6A] has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth capped at 24gbps.
People should be looking for a 40gbps receiver like the Onkyo TX-NR6050.



Slickdeals.jpg
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
If you want 4k/120, you need more bandwidth than that, yep. If you're 4k/60, that's plenty of bandwidth.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
The PlayStation 5 currently tops out at 32gbps when displaying 4k/120 HDR 4:2:2
The Xbox Series X tops out at 40gbps when displaying 4k/120 HDR 4:4:4

So:
1. Make sure manufacturers do not deceive you with your 2.1 HDMI bandwidth: It should be 40gbps.
2. Make sure manufacturers do not deceive you with your wattage: Number of watts advertised should be at 8 ohms, not 6 ohms.

Example deception: There is a Sony at Best Buy advertised at 145W.
But it's 145W at 6Ω - whereas at 8Ω [real SPEAKER value] - it is only 67W.
 
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OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
What does this mean? Are speakers with 6Ω rating not real speakers? :p
:sn: You're fired.
On major, reputable audio/video forums, it is standard to refer to a "100 watt receiver" without having to say "at 8Ω."
But it is well known looked-down upon marketing trickery to imply higher wattage and not say at "at 6Ω" because modern speakers are 8Ω speakers. It's standard in audio talk in 2022 to speak of watts at 8Ω.

I want to know how you typed the ohm sysmbol.

I used a notepad program I made many years ago with the help of an ocforums member.
I use it more than MS Word, it's simple and very useful.

I wanted to write an Article about it and wrote to EarthDog.
EarthDog tried to write something back but could never send it to me because my Inbox on ocforums was full.
I never found out what he wrote.

The article never got written.

I remain the sole user of the best Notepad program ever:


0.jpg

1.jpg

2.jpg
 

Railgun

Member
Joined
May 7, 2011
:sn: You're fired.
On major, reputable audio/video forums, it is standard to refer to a "100 watt receiver" without having to say "at 8Ω."
But it is well known looked-down upon marketing trickery to imply higher wattage and not say at "at 6Ω" because modern speakers are 8Ω speakers. It's standard in audio talk in 2022 to speak of watts at 8Ω.
I’d call that a large generalization and not really accurate. But that’s so far OT and reserved for ASR forums.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
We should learn whenever and wherever possible.


So first you have to get W per channel across the full audio bandwidth into 6 ohms at 0.09% THD, which is 90W at 6Ω for Sony, not 145W at 6Ω.

Then you multiply it by 6 and divide it by 8, so
if it's 90W at 6Ω at 0.09% THD, then

90 x 6 / 8 = 67.5W at 8Ω


Whereas Yamaha is 100W and Onkyo is 90W.

But I suspect the Onkyo to be 100W actually, since Costco Onkyo is a full rebadge of a 100W at 8Ω Onkyo receiver. They just said 90W I think to justify it costing so much more outside of Costco, for a non-Costco Onkyo model.

So in 2022, Costco Yamaha and Costco Onkyo are both 100W, whereas that Best Buy Sony is 67.5W, all things being equal. Costco Denon is 75W at 8Ω.