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What is the best heatsink/fan combo?

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Kramerica

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Joined
May 2, 2001
I have been looking around on various sites, and have been finding numerous articles, saying contrary things as to which was the best heatsink/fan combo. I was wondering if one of you would please give me suggestions. I will be running at 80 watts, w/ an ambient temperature of about 25 degrees on a Socket A mobo. My main concern is the ease of installation i.e. not requiring brute force. Thanks
 

Phil

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Location
Bolton, UK
There is no definative answer to this, I recomend either the Thermoengine with a 60mm delta, or either the Global Win WBK 32/38 or the TaiSol CGK760092 with a 45cfm or so 80mm fan. The latter 2 heatsink and fan combos would be quieter than the thermoengine and delta and I don't know of any one who has out an 80mm fan on the thermo successfully
 

SamDaMan

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May 27, 2001
Here is your answer

Phil (May 28, 2001 04:52 p.m.):
There is no definative answer to this, I recomend either the Thermoengine with a 60mm delta, or either the Global Win WBK 32/38 or the TaiSol CGK760092 with a 45cfm or so 80mm fan. The latter 2 heatsink and fan combos would be quieter than the thermoengine and delta and I don't know of any one who has out an 80mm fan on the thermo successfully

From my post earlier today:

This seems the best heatsink: (CGK760092)


Here is the 80mm - 60mm converter (its there somewhere I can't link to exact page "DownBurst") it looks to be all metal from its picture. They even have a 90mm - 60mm converter.


Here is the best / quietest 80mm Fan: (Its pabst) 8412 NGL not the right power connecter, I'll see if they have one that attach to mother board 3 pins instead of the 4 pins powersupply. 1600 rpm for 28 cfm. Should be quiet. And as suggested above you use the 8412 for the power supply and for the case fans so they is all the same noise level.



I am not overclocker so I pick for low noise. There are many 80mm fans that put out a lot more CFM. I feel that if you take CPU temp - System temp/76 Watts for AMD 1.333 not overclocked and get any number under .35 you is ok and within AMD recomended specs. Overclockers with more watts need more cfm, but heatsink and converter is the same.
 

Phil

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Location
Bolton, UK
don't bother with a 60mm comverter, especially on the taisol.
the taisol is 80mm by 60mm so you only loose 25% of the fan coverage where as a fan adapter strangle the air flow down to a 60mm circle which is only 2/3rds the coverage, plus the pressure of trying to get all that air down the adapter is counter productive as you get a lot of blow back, with most heatsinks you are better plonking the 80mm fan straight on or even bending the fins out a little, the taisol is great because it is 80mm long so the fan doesn't over hang as much as some heatsinks.
 

SamDaMan

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Joined
May 27, 2001
Phil (May 28, 2001 05:19 p.m.):
don't bother with a 60mm comverter, especially on the taisol.
the taisol is 80mm by 60mm so you only loose 25% of the fan coverage where as a fan adapter strangle the air flow down to a 60mm circle which is only 2/3rds the coverage, plus the pressure of trying to get all that air down the adapter is counter productive as you get a lot of blow back, with most heatsinks you are better plonking the 80mm fan straight on or even bending the fins out a little, the taisol is great because it is 80mm long so the fan doesn't over hang as much as some heatsinks.


I was thinking about this, and I am kinda thinking you is absolutly right on not need converter - its 3/4 coverage, of the total of the 60X80 tisol heatsink, not 2/3 unless you mean that 360 is 2/3 of 640 err guess not anyway but...

all you need is two "T" pices of metal: 20 on lett up, 60 on right up and 60 going down. You could cut it from a hardware store "T" that is 60/60/60 or so. Just invert them and screw into the existing 60 mm holes and then put your 80 into the top 20/60 cross of the T. You need screws that dont go as deep into the 60 mm heatsing as the regular ones (your T things will be much less thick than fan that come with HSF) and a long machine screw / nut for the 80mm fan mounting.

Or you could get a "T" that is at least sq root of 12800mm long (80mm on diagnol lenght) in the top t part and have solit connection on 3 screws with one open

Or you could get two sq root of 12800mm single strips and and some washer = thickness of the metal and cross one over the other. That might be best..... use the washers on the "top cross piece" so that it is level when screwing down to the 60mm heat sink.

Then you put machine screws into 80 mm position holes with a nut. And you have 4 machine screws sticking up at 80 mm spots and just put the fan into that with nut or nut/washer. Or put nuts on the bottom, but that seems harder.
 

Da Whip

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2001
Location
Sunny Florida, you can keep the midwest!!
Here is a recent review of high performance HSF;

There are about 8 or so that are worth looking at, it all depends on your goals. Best Clip and easiest install goes to the Vantec FCE62540D/6030D. Best cooling is the Thermoengine or the Swifttech .
Then there are the copper HSF.
 

SamDaMan

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2001
Here is antoher review site


Here is a very recent review of 46 HSF comparison and the swiftech was the best: temp wise. This is the best comparison review currently avilable I think:


I consider this unit the best as it has the best noise/temp control of the bunch (tie for 3rd best in temp and was 2nd best in noise):




Trouble is you cant find it but here:

 

phiber

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2001
Location
Queens, NY
well if u have the money i would say to go with the Swiftech MC462-A it fits a 80mm fan so it can be queit and it has an easy installation in which u attach it to the four holes around the socket but the only bad thing is that u have to take your motherboard out and do it
 

SamDaMan

Registered
Joined
May 27, 2001
Now we is talking: you can buy just the heat sink here:


And put whatever 80mm fan on it you want to. Lol!

Will it fit all Socket A boards? I have a MSI K7T. I have to read a bit more to see that it will fit on my motherboard.... Looks like it does. Cool. They threw compter with their HSF mounted on it from a 1 story building and the processor didn't crack! Lol.

 

Phil

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Location
Bolton, UK
SamDaMan (May 28, 2001 05:42 p.m.):

I was thinking about this, and I am kinda thinking you is absolutly right on not need converter - its 3/4 coverage, of the total of the 60X80 tisol heatsink, not 2/3 unless you mean that 360 is 2/3 of 640 err guess not anyway but...

all you need is two "T" pices of metal: 20 on lett up, 60 on right up and 60 going down. You could cut it from a hardware store "T" that is 60/60/60 or so. Just invert them and screw into the existing 60 mm holes and then put your 80 into the top 20/60 cross of the T. You need screws that dont go as deep into the 60 mm heatsing as the regular ones (your T things will be much less thick than fan that come with HSF) and a long machine screw / nut for the 80mm fan mounting.

Or you could get a "T" that is at least sq root of 12800mm long (80mm on diagnol lenght) in the top t part and have solit connection on 3 screws with one open

Or you could get two sq root of 12800mm single strips and and some washer = thickness of the metal and cross one over the other. That might be best..... use the washers on the "top cross piece" so that it is level when screwing down to the 60mm heat sink.

Then you put machine screws into 80 mm position holes with a nut. And you have 4 machine screws sticking up at 80 mm spots and just put the fan into that with nut or nut/washer. Or put nuts on the bottom, but that seems harder.

Or you could just put the 80mm fan on and settle for 75% of it's performance as I much doubt what you proposed would give that much more if any extra airflow.
If you were to use a 47cfm Ys-Tech like I do then you would get about 36cfm or so (hard to calculate plus you have the extra airflow around the outside off the cooler which would mean less recycled air was being blown onto it) but this would be over the entire surface of the heatsink rather than the just 75% of it like a 60mm fan does.
 

SamDaMan

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Joined
May 27, 2001
Well I am going to get the Swiftech HeatSink, and add my Pabst fan (super quiet 1600 rpm). Forget all that drilliing and stuff. Like the man said the Swiftech heatsink is made for 80mm fans. And it seems to fit on my motherboard. I have 1.33 athlon with msi raid motherboard. I not overclocker. "Gee lets spend $200 to increase our processor life from 2 years to 3 years, even though we only gonna use it for one year - hey but at least it will run good an extra year in the garbage dump."

Those who want max cooling can put a delta (is that named casue it sound like an airline company), I gonna use the super quiet fan.

Sam "59 is fine" DaMan.

A pabst 8412 NGL (or one with 3 prong plug) on a swifttech MC-462 heat sink. $19 plus $62. 1600 rpm at 28 cfm.
 
OP
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Kramerica

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Joined
May 2, 2001
I am thinking about getting an OCZ Gladiator. It seems the best price/performance combo. Anyone have personal experience with it, that they would like to share? Thanks