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what is the right fan for my Motherboard? plz help

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schlaualex98

New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Well this might be stupid Question, but I really want help My mother board is (GA-F2A88XM-HD3) My processor is (Amd A8-6600k) Series it is apu so i do not have gpu card And I want to buy 1 of those both CPU fans (Hyper 212 LED Turbo) or (Hyper H411R) specially the hyper 212 led and I know my CPU doesn't need that powerful Fan but I want it for future upgrades and I do not care if I will have to leave the cover of case open but the most important is that I do not remove any of my ram and the fan fits in the mother board it self with no problem, Height is no Problem but width and length are, and my case is no problem too, the motherboard is 9.8 ×6.7 I don't know if I measured it correctly because of the wires , the last thing those fans are the available ones to buy ATM at my place, I said all Info's , someone help plz and sry for mistakes in language and Being smart , thx :(:(:(:(
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
That Hyper 212 is probably one of the best bang for buck coolers on the market.
It will keep your APU nice and cool, just remember to blow the dust out occasionally.
For even better performance, you can add additional fan for a push pull air flow configuration.
 

ehume

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
You want a heatsink for the future. Yet the 212 has only four heatpipes. It doesn't matter how good a fan you put on it: the heatsink will carry away no more heat than its heatpipes can carry. That's why all the best heatsinks use six or more heatpipes.

Coolers are divided between air (heatsinks) and water (radiator systems and AIO's). All use fans: fans are just a way to move air. The fan on any device (and the 212 has featured several) is optional - some heatsinks are passive. Heatsinks transfer heat from the CPU to the air in the atmosphere. AIO's and rads do the same -- away from the CPU, so their radiative surfaces can be larger. Rads and heatsinks are no better than the air they work on, the so-called ambient: the cooler the air fed to them, the better job of cooling they can do. Hence the emphasis on cases.

Cooling implies active airflow, and active airflow implies fans. So you see the rads and AIO's may cool better than a heatsink, but they pay for it in noise.

The quietest, best-performing heatsinks are Probably made by Noctua, but here is where cost comes in: they are not cheap. Where the 212 shines is price. Adequate performance for a low price. So be aware of that.

Cooler Master never sent a 212 for me to review. But I did discover that a four-heatpipe heatsink (here) that beat a five-heatpipe heatsink (here). The heatsink the came out on top was a direct-contact heatsink, like the 212 you have your eye on.

So go ahead and get your CM. Just know that you can get more cooling, if you need it.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
What is the make and model of the memory? The motherboard is a mATX form factor board. The only problem might be that if the memory modules have tall heat spreaders they might be in the way of the fan on the Hyper 212 evo. In that case, usually you can just position the fan a little higher on the cooler fin stack. You could also move it to the backside of the cooler and use it as an exhaust fan.
 
OP
S

schlaualex98

New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
What is the make and model of the memory? The motherboard is a mATX form factor board. The only problem might be that if the memory modules have tall heat spreaders they might be in the way of the fan on the Hyper 212 evo. In that case, usually you can just position the fan a little higher on the cooler fin stack. You could also move it to the backside of the cooler and use it as an exhaust fan.
I guess you are right but those heat things are not that big the real problem in ram I guess, however thank you for your help and time :) :D



You want a heatsink for the future. Yet the 212 has only four heatpipes. It doesn't matter how good a fan you put on it: the heatsink will carry away no more heat than its heatpipes can carry. That's why all the best heatsinks use six or more heatpipes.

Coolers are divided between air (heatsinks) and water (radiator systems and AIO's). All use fans: fans are just a way to move air. The fan on any device (and the 212 has featured several) is optional - some heatsinks are passive. Heatsinks transfer heat from the CPU to the air in the atmosphere. AIO's and rads do the same -- away from the CPU, so their radiative surfaces can be larger. Rads and heatsinks are no better than the air they work on, the so-called ambient: the cooler the air fed to them, the better job of cooling they can do. Hence the emphasis on cases.

Cooling implies active airflow, and active airflow implies fans. So you see the rads and AIO's may cool better than a heatsink, but they pay for it in noise.

The quietest, best-performing heatsinks are Probably made by Noctua, but here is where cost comes in: they are not cheap. Where the 212 shines is price. Adequate performance for a low price. So be aware of that.

Cooler Master never sent a 212 for me to review. But I did discover that a four-heatpipe heatsink (here) that beat a five-heatpipe heatsink (here). The heatsink the came out on top was a direct-contact heatsink, like the 212 you have your eye on.

So go ahead and get your CM. Just know that you can get more cooling, if you need it.
You are right I will see if I can collect more money to buy much bigger with more heat pipes , hope I can buy liquid cooling system CPU but my case dose not support and I am scare if it is going to leak or something on the motherboard one day I am really confusing about all of that



That Hyper 212 is probably one of the best bang for buck coolers on the market.
It will keep your APU nice and cool, just remember to blow the dust out occasionally.
For even better performance, you can add additional fan for a push pull air flow configuration.
OK Thank you Mate :)



What is the make and model of the memory? The motherboard is a mATX form factor board. The only problem might be that if the memory modules have tall heat spreaders they might be in the way of the fan on the Hyper 212 evo. In that case, usually you can just position the fan a little higher on the cooler fin stack. You could also move it to the backside of the cooler and use it as an exhaust fan.
Also I figured out that my motherboard size is (244×174) mm is that help in any way and mAtx like you said.

 
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ehume

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
You are right I will see if I can collect more money to buy much bigger with more heat pipes , hope I can buy liquid cooling system CPU but my case dose not support and I am scare if it is going to leak or something on the motherboard one day I am really confusing about all of that
Most AIO's today do not leak, but I share your concern. Someone brought the Reeven Ouranos to my attention recently. It is still for sale. I reviewed it in 2015, and it did well. For $44.99, it is a good value. If you ever have reason to replace or add to its fan, I recommend the Thermalright TY-140 when it is on sale for $11-15. The best 140mm fan is the NF-A15, but it costs a lot and I don't think it would fit that heatsink. Best simply to get an Ouranos; you probably won't need an more fans.
 

freeagent

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2004
Location
Winnipeg!
NF-A15 can push 82.5cfm, and a TY-143 can push 130cfm with a supposedly nicer sound signature. I don't know if it will fit on the Reevan, but I would guess not.. unless you aren't afraid to use a ziptie :D If you aren't hunting for every degree that you can possibly save, just keep it simple and don't sweat the details.
 

ehume

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
NF-A15 can push 82.5cfm, and a TY-143 can push 130cfm with a supposedly nicer sound signature. I don't know if it will fit on the Reevan, but I would guess not.. unless you aren't afraid to use a ziptie :D If you aren't hunting for every degree that you can possibly save, just keep it simple and don't sweat the details.

Both the NF-A15 and the TY-140 sport 120mm spacings (105mm screw-hole to screw-hole). They have very similar blades, so the main diiferences in airflow will be RPM. the TY-140 lacks the "ears" of the NF-A15, so it is 140x140mm vs 150x140mm. I have both fans. Both will fit on a 140mm heatsink, but the NF-A15 might interfere with a close card.

In any case, get your heatsink and use it before you spend any money on more fans.
 

GreenSmoke

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2013
I will echo the Hyper 212 is one of your best bets.

I used to have a custom water cooled rig but when I went back to air, I never regretted it. Water is neat to look at and can do a good job cooling but if you aren't going to shoot for the largest possible overclock or coolest looking computer guts, the Hyper 212 is a winner.

I am still not sure about the RAM but if you dont know the make and model, a picture of a ram stick would probably be enough to say with a lot of certainty. Some cheep generic RAM can be tall, some expensive RAM can have a tall heat spreader but most RAM will fit just fine. I would say 90% or more will work just fine with the 212.
 
OP
S

schlaualex98

New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Most AIO's today do not leak, but I share your concern. Someone brought the Reeven Ouranos to my attention recently. It is still for sale. I reviewed it in 2015, and it did well. For $44.99, it is a good value. If you ever have reason to replace or add to its fan, I recommend the Thermalright TY-140 when it is on sale for $11-15. The best 140mm fan is the NF-A15, but it costs a lot and I don't think it would fit that heatsink. Best simply to get an Ouranos; you probably won't need an more fans.
OK thank u bro 4 helping ^^



I will echo the Hyper 212 is one of your best bets.

I used to have a custom water cooled rig but when I went back to air, I never regretted it. Water is neat to look at and can do a good job cooling but if you aren't going to shoot for the largest possible overclock or coolest looking computer guts, the Hyper 212 is a winner.

I am still not sure about the RAM but if you dont know the make and model, a picture of a ram stick would probably be enough to say with a lot of certainty. Some cheep generic RAM can be tall, some expensive RAM can have a tall heat spreader but most RAM will fit just fine. I would say 90% or more will work just fine with the 212.
The ram had same size of normal rams , not too tall or smth I

 
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