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What's the command to FORCE CHKDSK on reboot (not from Windows) on Windows 8/10

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c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
If you want to scan one or more hard drive partitions on reboot *not from Windows*, what is the command to set that up?

Every single thread on the internet talks about manual individual scanning from Windows which means you have to wait for each partition/drive scan to finish before manually scanning another one.


This old trick does not work on newer OS if you want to scan multiple drives on reboot:

To schedule CHKDSK on next boot, open any folder on the partition that you wish to check >
My Computer > Right Click on drive partition > Properties > Tools TAB > Check now...

If a folder on this drive is open, you will be given an option to do a scan on next boot.

Repeat for any other partitions that need to be scanned upon reboot.

Reboot and before Windows boots into desktop, chkdsk will commence for all partitions.
 

Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Couldn't you do it from a command line in the advanced start up options?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Open Command Prompt with administrator privileges, what we call "an elevated command prompt."

The command parameters are: chkdsk /f /r

Hit: Enter. Type: "y" for yes. Type: Exit. Then restart the computer.

Upon restart, chkdsk will commence to check the disk before the machine finishes loading Windows. The /f and /f switches are for "find" and "repair" I think.

Many times the checking process seems to get stuck on the 10% or 11% mark but it's not stuck. Can take 3-4 hours to finish sometimes if there is a lot of repair needed.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Ha :). I know about that, but you incorrectly assume that this tells the machine to run that at reboot.
That only happens sometimes, it frequently executes there and then, under Windows. Nothing in that command sets things up for reboot. I just tested it again and it executed under Windows and started the disk scan even though files were open on the drive being scanned.

It's pretty incredible (one again) that no one anywhere in the world has ever had a need to run chkdsk on reboot.
Or more usefully, to scan more than one partition, more than one hard drive after rebooting and before entering Windows.
Search turns up nothing on the topic. Only *if* for some reason, the scan cannot be executed under Windows, then it goes for setting it up on reboot, but it frequently can and therefore doesn't offer the reboot scan option.
 

Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
What I suggested opens the command prompt before windows starts. Then you could run chkdsk in DOS
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
What is the exact procedure, command lines and switches and all, to best run run it on drives C, D and E, before Windows loads?
 

Robert17

Premium Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Location
Republic of Texas
Would it be possible (I haven't tried this) for the primary to boot to USB and have a chkdsk on that bootable stick for those times; where the reboot would only perform it if you have the USB present?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Ha :). I know about that, but you incorrectly assume that this tells the machine to run that at reboot.
That only happens sometimes, it frequently executes there and then, under Windows. Nothing in that command sets things up for reboot. I just tested it again and it executed under Windows and started the disk scan even though files were open on the drive being scanned.

It's pretty incredible (one again) that no one anywhere in the world has ever had a need to run chkdsk on reboot.
Or more usefully, to scan more than one partition, more than one hard drive after rebooting and before entering Windows.
Search turns up nothing on the topic. Only *if* for some reason, the scan cannot be executed under Windows, then it goes for setting it up on reboot, but it frequently can and therefore doesn't offer the reboot scan option.

I'm not following you here. Whenever I enter the command and the switches I gave earlier, as soon as I restart the machine it gives a message saying something like, "If no key is entered, the disk will be scanned in 10 seconds." If you want to run chkdsk on another partition or disk other than the one the system is on you just specify the letter in the command prompt window. I have never tried this with multiple disks/partitions in a batch. The only reason you have to restart in order to run chkdsik is that it can't be executed on a mounted disk.

Found this: http://www.thewindowsclub.com/disk-error-checking-windows-8
 

robhagopian

New Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
I believe you're looking for 'fsutil dirty set c:' see also:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc788091(v=ws.11).aspx

If you want to scan one or more hard drive partitions on reboot *not from Windows*, what is the command to set that up?

Every single thread on the internet talks about manual individual scanning from Windows which means you have to wait for each partition/drive scan to finish before manually scanning another one.


This old trick does not work on newer OS if you want to scan multiple drives on reboot:

To schedule CHKDSK on next boot, open any folder on the partition that you wish to check >
My Computer > Right Click on drive partition > Properties > Tools TAB > Check now...

If a folder on this drive is open, you will be given an option to do a scan on next boot.

Repeat for any other partitions that need to be scanned upon reboot.

Reboot and before Windows boots into desktop, chkdsk will commence for all partitions.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Looking forward to testing that when I come back home next week. Thanks man.
I would want to set multiple partitions though so I assume the command line is identical with extra drive letters added.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
c6, I will say this on your behalf. You never, never come to us with garden variety issues or questions.
 
OP
c627627

c627627

c(n*199780) Senior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Separately entering
fsutil dirty set C:
and then only after that
fsutil dirty set D:

Will scan both volumes upon reboot. :thup:
Single like command like this does not work: fsutil dirty set C: D:

I don't know if there is a single command for multiple volumes and it appears there is no single command to remove the dirty bit, once set.
It appears you either have to go through with it or actually there is a complicated hex editing way to do it, but if anyone ever comes across a single line command for multiple volumes or a single line command to remove the dirty bit from a single volume....please post.

Thank you poster robhagopian for the original command line, I've been looking for that for a long time.
Welcome to the forums.