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When does Vcore get dangerous?

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wannaoc

Member
Joined
May 6, 2003
Location
Buried in UPS packages
I'm at 1.725 now and was just wondering what is the top "safe" limit for most chips, mainly Bartons but any will do. This is for an every day computer that I want to last as long as I can keep it. Thanks.
 

altec

polka dot ninja
Joined
Dec 23, 2002
Location
Doylestown, PA
I think that it is pretty dependent on temperature. On air, I would not let the temp get above 55C, So as long as the vcore keeps the temp below that, i would consider it safe.
 

madsam

Member
Joined
May 3, 2002
Location
New York
altec said:
I think that it is pretty dependent on temperature. On air, I would not let the temp get above 55C, So as long as the vcore keeps the temp below that, i would consider it safe.

that's as true as it gets.

i hear folks saying......as stated above.....that 1.85 is the limit, but there is no actual evidence of this......it is going to depend on temps, in my opinion. i have tornados as intakes and 120mm y.s.tech 125cfm fans as exhaust, and i use an slk-800 with a 92mm tornado, and my rig runs below 40c and my vcore is always 2 vcore or more.....i have run this chip at close to 2.3vcore on air, and it was getting warm, but didn't die on me....

keep the temps down, and all should go well.
;)
 

rogerdugans

Linux challenged Senior, not that it stops me...
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Corner of No and Where
Not sure about Bartons (my stuff is way old ;)) but just a general voltage pointer:

The higher above specification you run, the more likely you are to have disastrous consequences. And the more you will shorten the chips/components life span.

Keeping the chip cool negates that to a point, but past certain limits you ARE risking catastrophe: the higher the voltage, greater the risk.
 

madsam

Member
Joined
May 3, 2002
Location
New York
rogerdugans said:
Not sure about Bartons (my stuff is way old ;)) but just a general voltage pointer:

The higher above specification you run, the more likely you are to have disastrous consequences. And the more you will shorten the chips/components life span.

Keeping the chip cool negates that to a point, but past certain limits you ARE risking catastrophe: the higher the voltage, greater the risk.

i can agree with that....;)
 

altec

polka dot ninja
Joined
Dec 23, 2002
Location
Doylestown, PA
I agree 100% with rogerdugans, and I think that if you keep your vcore under 2v and 50C you will be fine.
 

hitechjb1

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2003
If the CPU is part of a mission critical system, such as a nuclear power plant, I would not put 2V on it.

If it is for a game machine or for taking benchmark without crucial data, and there are a few spare CPU lying around (like some of us here), I would not mind getting it to 2V for a DLT3C and 2.15V for a DKT3C such as Barton, as long as the temperature and hence stability are under control. And losing that CPU is not end of the day for you.

Let's see some official numbers:

According to the AMD datasheet for model 8: datasheet link

In Chapter 8,

Quoted:
"The AMD Athlon XP processor model 8 should not be subjected to conditions exceeding the absolute ratings, as such conditions can adversely affect long-term reliability or result in functional damage."

The absolute rating for Vcore = Vcc_core_dc_max + 0.5 V

Vcc_core_dc_max = Vcc_core_nominal + 0.05 V
Vcc_core_ac_max = Vcc_core_nominal + 0.15 V

Vcc_core_nominal = 1.50 V for DLT3C
Vcc_core_nominal = 1.60 V for DUT3C
Vcc_core_nominal = 1.65 V for DKT3C

E.g. 1700 DLT3C
Vcc_core_dc_max = 1.5 + 0.05 = 1.55 V
The absolute rating for Vcore = 1.55 + 0.5 = 2.05 V

The numbers are the same for model 10 (Barton).
So for Barton,
Vcc_core_nominal = 1.65 V
Vcc_core_dc_max = 1.65 + 0.05 = 1.70 V
The absolute rating for Vcore = 1.70 + 0.5 = 2.2 V


The above is based on my interpretation. Pls read the datasheet, and make your judgement.
 
Last edited:

rogerdugans

Linux challenged Senior, not that it stops me...
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Corner of No and Where
wannaoc said:
Well heres my thoughts, I figure if I stay below 2 vcore and keep my temps below 50 load I should be ok. Yes, no?

I think that should get you a pretty good compromise between performance and risk.

But I'm going to look up some stuff on Bartons.......;)

Edit:
And hitechjb1 looked up specs before I did;)

While my personal experience is with XP Pally chips, I found that 2.1v (on 1.75 default vcore) is borderline but probably ok with decent cooling. That's .35 volts above spec.

If your world will end if that chip dies I would suggest not running at that high a voltage. Otherwise, just watch the temps ;)
 
Last edited:

madsam

Member
Joined
May 3, 2002
Location
New York
hitechjb1 said:
If the CPU is part of a mission critical system, such as a nuclear power plant, I would not put 2V on it.

If it is for a game machine or for taking benchmark without crucial data, and there are a few spare CPU lying around (like some of us here), I would not mind getting it to 2 V as long as the temperature and hence stability are under control. And losing that CPU is not end of the day for you.

Let's see some official numbers:

According to the AMD datasheet for model 8: datasheet link

In Chapter 8,

Quoted:
"The AMD Athlon XP processor model 8 should not be subjected to conditions exceeding the absolute ratings, as such conditions can adversely affect long-term reliability or result in functional damage."

The absolute rating for Vcore = Vcc_core_dc_max + 0.5 V

Vcc_core_dc_max = Vcc_core_nominal + 0.05 V
Vcc_core_ac_max = Vcc_core_nominal + 0.15 V

Vcc_core_nominal = 1.50 V for DLT3C
Vcc_core_nominal = 1.60 V for DUT3C
Vcc_core_nominal = 1.65 V for DKT3C

E.g. 1700 DLT3C
Vcc_core_dc_max = 1.5 + 0.05 = 1.55 V
The absolute rating for Vcore = 1.55 + 0.5 = 2.05 V

The numbers are the same for model 10 (Barton).

The above is based on my interpretation. Pls read the datasheet, and make your judgement.

good info, but i would like to add that i think that better cooling, as many of us use, may give more tolerances than allowed by AMD....as i "think" they are speaking in terms of use with a stock cooling solution...and not based on extreme cooling.

also, the expected life is like 20 years on cpu's, or so i've read in the forums anyways.......so, if i went out of AMD'S specs, but used better cooling, i might be at 20 yrs or maybe a bit less...but at 2 vcore to 2.2 vcore, i may be reducing the life of the cpu to much less..............this is where the controvercy starts, because some cpu's may die in a month, and some in 2 years...and some in 5 years. there is no real data on this.......or so, i haven't seen any yet.........but this idea in overclocking is to get what you personally want out of a cpu, and if that means extreme daily overclock, but you are not concerned about that cpu in the next 6 months...it's going to be fine..........for those who want to have a 10 year overclcok, ...sure, i'd go by AMD's guidelines, and overclock from there................

these are just my opinions, as i have overclocked my cpu for around 4 months or so, and i have had no problem as of yet, and i ran pally's over 2 vcore 24/7, folding and other burn in's, for a good year, and they are fine as can be to date...for me to lose a chip, it's not going to bother me a whole lot since i get a newer one every 6 months since i started to overclock.......if the cpu is used for anything that requires the cpu to never fail, i would keep it stock, and get better cooling anyways...

thanks for the link to the datasheet, as i will read it when i have some time.......;)