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Where Can I Obtain This Near-Mythical Phenom ll Processor?

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Julian A Smith

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Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Hello Folks and thank you for welcoming me to OC'ers. I'm a new member and I retain that unique new-member smell. About a week ago my trusty middle-of-the road HP Pavilion dv7 4171us sent the second of its 3 cores packing so now I am down to 1 core of its Phenom ll X3 N850 processor. Although I hope to one day obtain a laptop on the order of an MSI Titian or something along that line my Pavilion is a pretty good entertainment laptop so its worth replacing the processor. I've been doing my homework and the processor I have alighted on and chosen to install is the Phenom ll X940 BE Quad Core Mobile Processor (HMX940HIR42GM). I have only one problem with the X940 as my choice of an upgrade processor: WHERE ON EARTH CAN I FIND ONE? I've been to the usual suspects looking for one i.e., Amazon, eBay etc, (even, reluctantly, Alibaba) and it just cannot be obtained, even used, for love or money. Can someone please help me locate this processor, preferably two of them because they are becoming so rare, and if you do I will be more than happy to buy the coffee of your choice (no Starbucks!) if your state still accepts genuine U.S Confederate currency.
Seriously, thanks to any for helping me obtain this processor!
 
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Julian A Smith

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Apr 30, 2017
Dear SSJWIZARD, Thank you for responding so quickly to my post. You've provided some intriguing alternatives for my consideration. The reason I'm so set upon the particular processor I mentioned is because it's the only one that is unlocked and will also fit my application. Somewhere, out there, must be an X940 mobile in search of a new home; I've drawn up the adoption papers, added a room in my house for it, and I mean to give it a secure environment in which it can flourish and reach its potential. Please, if you do happen to come across one I'd greatly appreciate it if you would let me know. Again, thanks so much!
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
While unlocked has its uses in a custom desktop environment, it won't offer you much benefit in an OEM laptop. The motherboard isn't likely to let you OC (does it?). You would have to use AMD's Overdrive software utility for overclocking the BE chip. Starting with a faster CPU in the first place would save you from that less than optimum solution.
 

ssjwizard

Has slightly less legible writing than Thideras
Joined
Mar 12, 2002
While unlocked has its uses in a custom desktop environment, it won't offer you much benefit in an OEM laptop. The motherboard isn't likely to let you OC (does it?). You would have to use AMD's Overdrive software utility for overclocking the BE chip. Starting with a faster CPU in the first place would save you from that less than optimum solution.

Basically this! So this is the main issue I see. Your computer came stock with a 3core chip. The cooling solution is engineered around said 3 core CPU. Adding that 4th core is going to increase the TDP/heat output. Adding overclocking into the mix is going to compound that problem further. I suspect that your CPU cooler will have a challenging time just keeping up with the stock heat of the X4.

Even without an unlocked multiplier you can likely do some mild OC using BCLK adjustment.
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
Even without an unlocked multiplier you can likely do some mild OC using BCLK adjustment.

I'd be surprised if the mobo allowed that. AOD works, to a point, but as ssjwizard stated, cooling will be an issue. Laptops tend to be marginal out of the box on that score.
 

Bluefalcon13

Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2008
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
Just a heads up, and I don't know how HP does business, but for example:

My Dell precision M4500 came with a dual core i5 (first gen, 35W) and used the exact same cooling solution for the i7-920XM (at least 45W, think it was higher). OEMs may not make different cooling solutions for all cpu options. My precision run my i7-720qm (quad, 45W) without any issue even face punching the CPU. Best bet is to check the service manual for a laptop, and see if they even have different cooling solutions for each CPU option. Usually the service manual will list part numbers for everything.
 
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Julian A Smith

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Apr 30, 2017
Alaric, I, in fact, do have not one but 2 of AMD's over-clocking programs (2 different versions) stored away for future use. When I first acquired my computer I came across the programs but I didn't know why my attempts to OC were futile until I learned that a processor has to be capable of receiving modest programming instructions i.e., the input through an over-clocking program. It was only then that I went upon a quest to locate the proper processor for that purpose. As far as seeing any extra benefits with an OEM machine, I think that having the ability to make minor adjustments up and down in clock speeds could help even-out the quad cores' tendencies toward superior multi-tasking at the expense of slower single or dual-threaded applications. There may be a problem concerning the BIOS as to whether or not the installed version will accept a programmable processor but I'm more than willing to experiment. It's the American way!!
 
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Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
Alaric, I, in fact, do have not one but 2 of AMD's over-clocking programs (2 different versions) stored away for future use. When I first acquired my computer I came across the programs but I didn't know why my attempts to OC were futile until I learned that a processor has to be capable of receiving modest programming instructions i.e., the input through an over-clocking program. It was only then that I went upon a quest to locate the proper processor for that purpose. As far as seeing any extra benefits with an OEM machine, I think that having the ability to make minor adjustments up and down in clock speeds could help even-out the quad cores' tendencies toward superior multi-tasking at the expense of slower single or dual-threaded applications. There may be a problem concerning the BIOS as to whether or not the installed version will accept a programmable processor but I'm more than willing to experiment. It's the American way!!



OK, I'm looking, but I'm not finding any flaws here. LOL :salute:
 
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Julian A Smith

Registered
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Alaric, when I searched CPU World on their socket-compatibility page (Socket S1 ((S1g4))) I found the following: "S1g4 is the forth and last revision of socket S1. The S1g4 was employed exclusively by mobile AMD microprocessors from 2010 mainstream platform, code named Danube. All processors from the Danube platform were based on 'Champlain' core, which was a variation of desktop Regor and Propus cores with added low-power features. The S1g4 revision works with single-, dual-, triple- and quad core processors, operating at frequencies up to 3.2 Ghz, having Thermal Design Power up to 45 Watt and packaged in 638-pin lidless micro-PGA package. The socket supports dual-channel DDR3 with data rates up to 1333 Mhz, and one HyperTransport 3.0 link with 1.8 Ghz or lower frequency. All CPU's in the table below will physically fit into the socket, but not all of them may be supported by all motherboards. If you're upgrading a processor in [an] existing system, MAKE SURE THAT THE CPU IS COMPATIBLE WITH YOUR MOTHERBOARD. Please see 'Upgrading socket S1 (S1g4) motherboards' section below for more information". The following is from the "Upgrading Motherboards" section: "The good thing about Danube platform is that all 'Champlain' processors were launched in [a] relatively short period of time...and all of them have the same core-stepping which means most motherboards will support [the] full line of S1g4 microprocessors. Although all 'Champlain' CPU's are very likely to be supported by [the] majority of motherboards, you still need to consider other factors such as Thermal Design Power, that may limit your upgrade choices. Also, your upgrade options could be different depending on the type of applications that your running on your laptop.

. If you're planning to run multi-threaded applications or many CPU-intensive processes at once then consider
upgrading to any processor from the Phenom ll Quad-Core family. Be aware that these CPU's are slower in
single- and dual-threaded applications than Turion ll and dual- and triple-core Phenom ll's, therefore, go
with [a] Quad-Core CPU only if you really need to.

. If you need maximum performance in existing games, or single- and dual-threaded applications, then the
best upgrade option is any one of [the] Phenom ll Dual-Core microprocessors.


Other Upgrade Considerations:

. Be careful when upgrading to CPU's with higher TDP. If you have [a] weak fan/heatsink then you may end
up with a system that automatically shuts down during heavy workloads. Usually, upgrading from 25W to
[a] 35W CPU, or 35W to [a] 45W CPU should not present a problem. If you want to be on the safe side,
then chose [an] upgrade processor with the same, or lower TDP."

Keep in mind that the stats and numbers cited above all pertain to mobile (laptop) applications. So, Alaric, it would seem that I'm on reasonably good ground in my upgrade pursuit and my hope is that I can locate the holy grail of AMD mobile S1 socket processors, i.e., the Phenom ll Quad-Core X940 BE!
 
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Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
Sounds like a plan. Keep us updated! I, for one, would like to see a successful conclusion to your project! Every success (and failure) adds to the knowledge base here. :thup:
 
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Julian A Smith

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Apr 30, 2017
Well, thank you for that. If I can locate the processor then I think I'll have some very interesting and informative results to share with everyone.